Club Cocktail

Club Cocktail

Club Cocktail

2/3 Dry Gin (1 1/2 oz Boodles Gin)
1/3 Italian Vermouth (3/4 oz Carpano Antica)
1 Dash Yellow Chartreuse

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Here’s one I expected to like a lot. While I found it fine, it didn’t jump out of the glass at me. I think the Boodles may have been a bad choice. Something like Tanqueray or Junipero would have fought it out more actively with the sweet vermouth and Chartreuse.

Remade with Junipero and Cinzano Rosso, I found I did enjoy it to a much greater extent. Sort of a light version of the Bijou/Jewel.

Really should double strain these stirred cocktails, as pieces of cracked ice sometimes get out around the side of the julep strainer. Not very attractive.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Claridge Cocktail

Claridge Cocktail

Claridge Cocktail

1/3 Dry Gin (1 oz Boodles Gin)
1/3 French Vermouth (1 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/6 Apricot Brandy (1/2 oz Rothman and Winter Orchard Apricot)
1/6 Cointreau (1/2 oz Cointreau)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I just got this new Apricot liqueur from Rothman and Winter. I was really hoping with it’s delicious fresh taste of apricots, and wonderful scent of apricot eau de vie, the Claridge would be a home run.

In some ways, it is a very good feature of the Apricot Liqueur. You can really taste it. On the other hand, the cocktail itself is a bit subtle and single noted.

I felt like a little something was missing. I was a little worried, though, if you added a lemon twist, you would lose the delicate smell of the apricots. And if you added peach bitters, you might lose the delicate balance between the cointreau and apricot liqueur.

Maybe a different gin or a dash of one of the lighter orange bitters?

I believe Harry Craddock was also involved at the bar at the Claridge Hotel in London, so perhaps named after the bar in that hotel?

A cocktail with the same ingredients and proportions is called the “The Frankenjack” in Judge Jr’s “Here’s How” and in the Savoy Cocktail Book. Judge Jr. sez “The Frankenjack” was, “Invented by the two proprietors of very, very well-known Speakeasy in New York City.” Further investigation is necessary!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Cinzano Cocktail

Cinzano Cocktail

Cinzano Cocktail

2 Dashes Angostura Bitters
2 Dashes Orange Bitters (Regan’s Orange Bitters)
1 Glass Cinzano Vermouth (2 oz Cinzano Rosso)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass (Build over cracked ice in a medium glass. Stir to chill.), and sqeeze orange peel on top.

As usual, rocks, thank you very much, for my vermouth cocktails.

Got myself a fresh bottle of Cinzano Rosso and quite enjoyed this.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Church Parade Cocktail

Church Parade Cocktail

2/3 Plymouth Gin (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)
1 Dash Orange Curacao (1/3 tsp. Brizard Orange Curacao)
4 Dashes Orange Juice (1 1/3 tsp. Orange Juice)
1/3 French Vermouth (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass

After the last few “cocktails” I was kind of excited that I would get to make one with an actual portion of booze.

Then I decided to google and find out more about Church Parades.

Dum, de dum, English and Scottish tradition, parades of church goers walking from here to there. Generally Church to Cemetery or some such. How Quaint. Certainly could use a drink before one of those sorts of things. Oh look! The most (in)famous Church Parades of all are the Orange Marches in Northern Ireland…Oh, wait one second: Orangemen, Orange Juice, Orange Curacao, English Gin…Goddamn it!

I can tell you it looked like this before I poured it down the sink:

Church Parade Cocktail

Frankly, it could use some bitters, if for no other reason than poetic license.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Chrysanthemum Cocktail

Chrysanthemum Cocktail

Chrysanthemum Cocktail

3 Dashes Absinthe (1 tsp. Lucid Absinthe)
1/3 Benedictine (1 oz Benedictine)
2/3 French Vermouth (2 oz Noilly Prat Dry)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze orange peel on top.

Well-known and very popular in the American Bar of the S.S. “Europa.”

The Chrysanthemum cocktail really surprised me. I expected it to be far too sweet and/or vermouth-ey.

It really isn’t.

The sweetness is about on level with that of a not too sweet gewurtztraminer or glass of apple juice.

Deliciously complex, yet every ingredient is there to be savored.

It’s true I am a sucker for pretty much any cocktail with Bendictine; but this is one of my new favorites. Definitely something I will make again.

By, the way, the S.S. Europa had its own interesting history:

S.S. Europa

Launched on March 19, 1930, she served peace time passengers for Germany, participated in war time activities for the Third Reich, was confiscated by the US in 1945, took part in troop movement for the US soldiers, then back to passengers for France after WWII as the S.S. Liberté. Finally the scrap yards of Italy in 1962.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Chorus Lady Cocktail

Chorus Lady Cocktail

Chorus Lady Cocktail

The Juice of 1/4 Orange
1/3 Dry Gin (1 oz BlueCoat Gin)
1/3 Italian Vermouth (1 oz Cinzano Rosso)
1/3 French Vermouth (1 oz Noilly Prat Dry)

Shake well and strain into medium-size glass. Add slice of orange and a cherry. (Uh, oops, I forgot to add a “flag” and instead used an orange twist for the garnish. Ooops!)

A few people have told me that BlueCoat mixes well with citrus, so I thought I would try it in this Bronx-like cocktail.

I think my taste might have been a little off the night I tried this; but, my initial reaction was that the Cinzano Rosso completely overwhelmed the cocktail, and that I might as well have been using vodka for all that the BlueCoat added.

After the cocktail warmed a bit, it seemed like there was some sort of bitter menthol/eucalyptus aftertaste. I dunno if that was the Eastern Mediterranean organic Juniper berries or the leftovers of a slight overdose of Thai Basil in the Pho I had for dinner. Something seemed weird. Anyway, to me, BlueCoat didn’t seem to work in the Chorus Lady.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Cherry Mixture Cocktail

Cherry Mixture Cocktail
Cherry Mixture Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters (Very Healthy Dash)
1 Dash Maraschino (Luxardo Maraschino Cocktail)
1/2 French Vermouth (2 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/2 Italian Vermouth (2 oz Carpano Antica)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass (Build over cracked ice in a double old fashioned glass, stir briefly to chill). Serve with cherry (3 Amarena Toschi Cherries).

A bit of a radical departure from the method.

I just find I enjoy these vermouth type “cocktails” more over ice than up, so there you go.

Quite enjoyed this formulation. A bit on the sweet side. A slightly less bitter Americano ? Maybe most appropriate as a digestiv?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Charles Cocktail

Charles Cocktail

Charles Cocktail

1/2 Italian Vermouth (1 1/2 oz Carpano Antica Vermouth)
1/2 Brandy (1 1/2 oz Pierre Ferrand Ambre Cognac)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters

Shake (stir – eje) well and strain into cocktail glass.

This is the only known authentic Jacobite Cocktail.

Interesting! This seems to indicate that this cocktail was named for Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Silvester Maria Stuart (or Bonny Prince Charles.) I would expect whisky; but, maybe he was a brandy fancier.

I was a little trepidatious about formulating this one, being afraid the Antica would overpower the Cognac, so was going to use the Cinzano Rosso. At the last minute I decided to go with the Antica. Glad I did.

The Carpano Vermouth and Cognac do really interesting things together. It has some nice bitter elements; but, there are some cool almost flowery flavors that are brought out in both the brandy and the vermouth. Nice.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Cat’s Eye Cocktail

Cat's Eye Cocktail

Cats-Eye Cocktail (6 people)

1/2 Glass Fresh Lemonade (1/4 oz Lemon Juice, 1/2 teaspoon sugar)
1/2 Glass Water (1/4 oz water)
2 Glasses Gin (1 oz Boodles Gin)
1 Dessertspoonful Kirsch (Dash Trimbach Kirsch)
1/2 Glass Cointreau (1/4 oz Cointreau)
Not quite 2 Glasses French Vermouth (Not quite 1 oz Noilly Prat Dry)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glasses. Serve with an olive.

Skipped the olive.

A tasty cocktail. A bit like an Aviation crossed with a Martini. Certainly something worthwhile to try, if you enjoy those sorts of sweet tart flavors.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Caruso Cocktail

Caruso Cocktail

Caruso Cocktail

1/3 Dry Gin (1 oz Boodles gin)
1/3 French Vermouth (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/3 Green Creme de Menthe (1/2 oz Brizard Creme de Menthe)

Shake (stir – eje) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I did slightly adjust the proportions here.

Still, I expected to really dislike this drink.

Oddly, I didn’t, and ended up finishing it.

Living in San Francisco, Enrico Caruso and the 1906 earthquake are intertwined.

I found this interesting piece of history:

Enrico Caruso and the 1906 Earthquake

Enrico Caruso (1873 – 1921) is considered by many music lovers to be the greatest operatic tenor of all time. He was on tour in San Francisco during the Great Earthquake, and appeared in Carmen at the Mission Opera House a few hours before the disaster.

And he never returned after the earthquake!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.