Peach Blow Fizz

Peach Blow Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon or 1 Lime (Juice 1/2 Lemon AND juice 1/2 Lime)
4 Mashed Strawberries. (6 Mashed Raspberries)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (Generous Tablespoon Rich Simple Syrup)
1 Tablespoonful Sweet Cream. (1 Tablespoon Heavy Whipping Cream)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Plymouth Gin)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

Another of the Fizzes sourced from Hugo Ensslin’s 1916 “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”, the original recipe is slightly different from the Savoy Cocktail Book:

Peach Blow Fizz: Juice ½ Lime; Juice ½ Lemon; 4 Strawberries, mashed up; 1 teasponful Powdered Sugar; 1 drink Gin; 1 Pony Cream. Made and served as directed for plain Gin Fizz.

Again you see Ensslin calling for more than one type of citrus. His recipe also calls for a bit more cream, generally a “Pony” is considered an ounce.

The Peach Blow Fizz is one of those puzzling cocktails. First off, there’s the whole “Blow” thing, that, as far as I know nobody really understands. Second there’s the “Peach” thing. Why is this a “Peach Blow Fizz” without any peaches?

I have no idea.

What I can tell you is, the Peach Blow Fizz is a delicious species of Fizz.

The cream sometimes freaks people, well men, out. One Savoy Cocktail Book night, a friend was in and interested in Savoy Cocktails with Strawberries. He’d tried the Bloodhound and I’d garnished his King Cole with Strawberries (Fernet and Strawberries, a great combination, by the way) and was looking for a Third drink before calling it a night. I mentioned the Peach Blow Fizz, and he said, “Oooh, that has cream, doesn’t it?” So that was a no go.

Anyway, I think I ended up making a non-strawberry drink, Jabberwock or something, but I was a little sad he didn’t man up and just drink the pink fruity concoction. It’s not like it has a lot of Cream, or anything. It’s no Grasshopper or Brandy Alexander.

Oh, yeah, Raspberries. I forgot to buy strawberries, so substituted frozen raspberries this time. A change I do heartily recommend.

Tasty, pink, fruity, and boozy, it’s actually a pretty serious drink, for all its girliness.

Heh, one of these days, I’m going to have to try it out when I get an order for a Gin and citrus Bartender’s choice, not too sweet. I bet they’ll love it.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Whizz-Doodle Cocktail

First, just a reminder that Sunday, Jan 30, 2010, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders (and me) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Whizz-Doodle Cocktail
1/4 Scotch Whisky.
1/4 Sweet Cream.
1/4 Crème de Cacao.
1/4 Dry Gin
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Uh, yeah, right. I’m not making that.

Especially since I’ve already made it once, under another name: Barbary Coast Cocktail

Casting about for a Re-make/Re-model for this cocktail, I recalled the strategy I used for the Parisian Blonde, using a sort of divide and conquer method I learned from Erik Adkins at Heaven’s Dog.

I was chatting the other day in the Mixo Bar, grousing about having to make this horror. Between the insults to my Mom’s honor and comments about my own extreme age, I managed to sneak in a question, asking my compatriots which Scotch would go best with chocolate. Paul Clarke suggested Speyside, with its flavors of honey and heather. Unfortunately, (or fortunately,) the only Speyside Single Malt in the house at the moment is The MacAllan Cask Strength.

Hm, honey and Scotch is always a winning combo. But, do I have to use Creme de Cacao at all to get the chocolate flavor in this cocktail? Maybe another strategy for the Chocolate. And speaking of other strategies, does the Dry Gin have any function at all here, beyond a lengthener? Why not just use Vodka, and a single grain vodka at that, for the other spirit in this drink?

Whizz-Doodle Re-Make/Re-Model

1 oz Macallan Cask Strength Scotch;
1 oz Vodka Which Shall Not Be Named;
1 Barspoon JC Snyder Wild Buckwheat Honey*;
dash Bittermens Mole Bitters;
1/2 oz Cream;
Bittersweet Chocolate.

Dissolve Honey in Scotch and Vodka, add a Dash (or two) Mole Bitters, and stir with ice to chill. Strain into a cocktail glass. Whip cream to soft foam and float on top. Garnish with grated bitter chocolate.

Holy Crap! That is pretty decent, a dessert cocktail for Scotch and chocolate loving friends. It is certainly an improvement over the Barbary Coast.

*As a certified honey enthusiast and student of Botany, I will note that this is NOT the type of honey most often sold in the rest of the US as “Buckwheat Honey”. Most Buckwheat Honey comes from the same Buckwheat used to make Buckwheat Flour (aka Fagopyrum esculentum). The honey which Bees make from this type of Buckwheat is extremely dark and pungent. Some say unpleasantly so. However, in California there are several native plants also called Buckwheats: California Buckwheat. The honey Bees make from these plants is fairly lightly flavored and quite pleasant. If you don’t have access to California Buckwhat honey, choose another light, not too fruity honey. Clover would probably be a good choice.

Re-Made/Re-Modeled.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Snowball Cocktail

006

Snowball Cocktail
1/6 Crème de Violette. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Benoit Serres liqueur de violette)
1/6 White Crème de Menthe. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Brizard White Creme de Menthe)
1/6 Anisette. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Anis del Mono dulce)
1/6 Sweet Cream. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Cream)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Tanqueray Gin*)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

This is woman’s work.

I have, in the past, put myself on record as saying this is possibly one of the worst cocktails in the entire Savoy cocktail Book.

Oddly, I have made this monstrosity on more than one occasion during our Savoy Cocktail Book Nights at Alembic Bar. In fact, one time it was even an out of town bartender who asked for it. I was like, “Really?! You know what is in that, right?” Yet he persisted in his desire to experience the Snowball. Curious. Whenever we make it there, it just seems so much worse than anything else we make in the course of the evening.

Considered on its own, however, and in this rather diminutive size, I am not entirely sure it is without its own charms. Perhaps it was my choice of brands? Tanqueray having a bit more spine than the usual Beefeater, Benoit Serres being a fine Violette, Brizard being a tasty Menthe, and Anis del Mono, one of the finest spanish Anis.

In any case, this wasn’t quite the creamy mouthwash disaster I remember. Still, as the Savoy Cocktail Book sez, this really is “Women’s Work”.

*The jungle wrapped, half bottle of Tanqueray Gin used in this cocktail was sent to me by a firm promoting the brand, and, as you may have read on other blogs, the putative birthday of Charles Tanqueray, alleged inventor of the gin. I actually like to have Tanqueray in the house, as it is a fine example of Juniper heavy London Dry Gin. However, as it is rather more expensive than the always useful Beefeater, I often pass it up and save my “special gin” money for things like Junipero. Drinking it in this cocktail, I am reminded that it is really a very good gin.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Pink Rose Cocktail

Pink Rose Cocktail

Pink Rose Cocktail.

The White of 1 Egg.
1 Teaspoonful Grenadine. (homemade)
1 Teaspoonful Lemon Juice.
1 Teaspoonful Sweet Cream.
2/3 Glass Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 11)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Hmm… Not much egg white foam here. I think my eggs might be getting a bit old.

In any case, not sure exactly what to call this. It’s almost a peach blow fizz without the soda.

To be honest, it’s kind of good, albeit heavy on the gin. I’ll take it over most of the previous Lemon-free pink ladies any day.

All the same, it would be better as a fizz.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Panama Cocktail

Panama Cocktail

Panama Cocktail.

1/3 Crème de Cacao. (3/4 oz Mozart Black Chocolate Liqueur)
1/3 Sweet Cream. (3/4 oz Cream)
1/3 Brandy. (3/4 oz Osocalis Brandy)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.  (How about: Lightly whip cream with a dash of sugar syrup until slightly thickened.  Stir brandy and Creme de Cacao together to chill and strain into a cocktail glass.  Layer thickened cream carefully onto drink.  Garnish with freshly grated nutmeg.)

OK, I’m cheating.  I can’t take the credit for this great idea.

One of the drinks we are serving at Heaven’s Dog is from Charles H. Baker, Jr. and called the “Tiger’s Milk II”.  This drink follows the pattern for most cream and spirits drinks and is of typically Baker-esque proportions.

Old brandy 1 1/2 jiggers, Bacardi Gold Seal the same; 1/2 cup each of thick cream and milk, then sweeten to taste.  Shake vigorously for at least 1/2 minute with big lumps of ice and serve in a goblet.  Dust with nutmeg, or ground mace, or cinnamon.

Uh, yeah, since Baker preferred 2 oz jiggers, that’s, um, 6 ounces of spirits and a cup of half and half. Wheee! That’s a party in a glass, all right.

Erik Adkins shrunk the spirits by about a third, then separated the cream agitation from the chilling of the cocktail. When I asked he how he’d thought of separating the cream out of the drink into a separate element, he said he’d seen a similar drink at Clover Club in Brooklyn, NY. In any case, the Tiger’s Milk II has proven to be a brisk seller at the restaurant, even if it is a bit of a pain to make.

So I am stealing from him and the Clover Club here for my version of the Panama.

Give it a try some time, and you’ll see this Alexander-like drink in a new light.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Alexander’s Sister Cocktail

Alexander’s Sister Cocktail

1/3 Dry Gin (1 oz Beefeater’s Gin)
1/3 Creme de Menthe (1 oz Brizard Creme de Menthe)
1/3 Sweet Cream (1 oz Cream)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Ladies are advised to avoid this cocktail as often as possible.

Or anyone else for that matter. My aversion to dairy and overly sweet cocktails makes this slightly stiffer cousin of the Grasshopper one of my least favorite of cocktails from the “Savoy Cocktail Book.”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Alexander Cocktail (No. 2)

Alexander Cocktail (No. 2)

1/3 Crème de Cacao. (generous 3/4 oz Crème de Cacao)
1/3 Brandy. (generous 3/4 oz Korbel VSOP Brandy)
1/3 Fresh Cream. (generous 3/4 oz Sweet Cream)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Even though I neglected it, a sprinkle of freshly grated nutmeg or cocoa is a nice addition to this cocktail.)

I guess I don’t particularly think of this as a 1930s style cocktail, as by the time I grew up in the 1970s, it was a staple of bars all over the Midwest.

I do, however, have a vague memory of it being an ice cream blender drink when I was growing up, rather than a cocktail.

Like the Alexander (No. 1) it does need to be shaken well, and to me is rather more appealing.

Oddly, on Feist’s new record “The Reminder” there is a song about a boy she calls her “Brandy Alexander.” “Always gets me into trouble,” but, “It goes down easy.” A fine characterization of a Brandy Alexander, if there ever was one.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Alexander Cocktail (No. 1)

Alexander Cocktail

l/2 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Dry Gin)
1/4 Crème de Cacao. (3/4 oz)
1/4 Sweet Cream. (3/4 oz Cream)

Shake (very!) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Garnish with a sprinkle of cocoa.)

You probably won’t find this version of the Alexander made too often anymore, though at one time it was probably the most popular. The Brandy Alexander seems to be the default these days.

In any case, the gin version of the Alexander is alright, I suppose, if you like this sort of girly type drink. Like all cream based cocktails, you do need to really shake the Alexander Cocktail hard and long, to give it the lightness and air it needs.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.