Broadway Smile Cocktail

Broadway Smile Cocktail

1/3 Creme de Cassis (Brizard Cassis de Bourdeaux)
1/3 Swedish Punch (Facile Swedish Punch)
1/3 Cointreau

Use liqueur glass and pour carefully so that ingredients do not mix.

Of the layered liqueur cocktails I’ve tried so far, I have to say this is my favorite. Unfortunately, it involves an ingredient you’re going to need to make yourself, Swedish Punch.

The Facile Swedish Punsch arrived to me via the kindness of internet acquaintances.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Neige Ice Cider

As it happens, I enjoy a good dessert wine, (or “pudding wine” as our English friends call them,) from time to time.

I have an especial weakness for Sauterne and Tokaji Aszú. Well, not to mention Port, Trockenbeerenauslese,  Pedro Ximénez…

Anyway, given this unhealthy interest in sweet wines, and an especial fondness for apples, I was interested to learn of Canadian Ice Ciders a few years ago.

Like ice wines, ice ciders are made from the concentrated juice squeezed from frozen fruit.

Unfortunately, it didn’t really seem like many were imported into the US so I kind of gave up on the idea of trying it.

However, while perusing the dessert wines at a local liquor store recently, I was surprised to see a single bottle of La Face Cachée de la Pomme‘s Neige Ice Cider. I asked the store manager about it, and he said if I wanted to try it, I should buy it, because that was the only bottle he had.

We finally tried it last night after dinner and all I can say is, “Wow!”

I truly hope this isn’t the last time I get to try Ice Cider, as Neige is really fantastic stuff.

Super concentrated, delicious and complex, apple flavor.  Very sweet, but with enough acidity and complexity to keep it from being cloying.  The aroma seemed to just fill the glass with the essence of apple.  It went well with the carrot cake we had for dessert, but I could also see it pairing with a cheese plate, Foie Gras, or Pate.

Blanche Cocktail

Blanche Cocktail

1/3 Anisette (1/2 oz Anis del Mono Dulce or as Mrs. Underhill calls it, “Devil Juice”)
1/3 White Curacao (1/2 oz Brizard Orange Curacao)
1/3 Cointreau (1/2 oz Cointreau)
(dash Regan’s Orange Bitters)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Still trying to make my peace with these pesky after dinner cocktails. Imagining they are intended to be served with coffee, I made my self a cup of tea to go with it. It’s actually pretty tasty trading leisurely sips of the darjeeling tea and Blanche Cocktail. I felt very “Euro”. Orange and Anis weren’t flavors I expected to go together quite this well. Still, very sweet.

There are a few different styles of Absinthe. Verte, which is colored, post distillation, by macerating various herbs in the distillate (primarily Petit Wormwood and Lemon Balm) and Blanche which is uncolored. The Swiss were, and still are, quite famous for the high quality of their Blanche Absinthes.

Fairly certain this cocktail is probably named after the “Blanche” style of Absinthe. If I had used white curacao, the cocktail would be a pearly, opalescent pale white like a Blanche Absinthe. Unfortunately, I only have orange curacao, so the cocktail is a pearly, opalescent pale orange.

BTW, I added the orange bitters because I suspect Curacao used to have more of a bitter orange kick than the style Brizard currently makes it in. One day I’ll have to try the stuff that actually comes from Curacao.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Angel’s Wings Cocktail

Angel’s Wings Cocktail

1/3 A Raspberry syrup. (Monin)
1/3 Maraschino. (Luxardo)
1/3 Crème de Violette. (Benoit-Serres Liqueur de Violette)

Use liqueur glass and poor ingredients carefully so that they do not mix.

If the girl does not like it, do not drink it, but pour it quickly into the nearest flower vase.

Strangely, this was my favorite of the layered “Angel” Coctkails. I bet it would be even better with home made Raspberry Syrup!

For posterity, I should say something about the nearly extinct European tradition of Pousse-café.

Over the holidays the in-laws got out the slide projector. I know, I know. Perhaps you too are of the age where you still shudder at the mere mention of slides. Never ending trip pictures accompanied by dry narrative and the like.

These slides were quite interesting, as they were pictures from dinner parties in the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. Amazing to see the elaborate table settings. Everyone seemed to have a drink soldered into their right hand from the beginning of the evening until the end. When they got to the after dinner coffee, it was fascinating to see, on the table along with a bowl of cigarettes, that they also got out the liqueur. There was a bottle of Grand Marnier, something that was potentially identified as Creme de Menthe, and others.

According to some authorities, more generally, Pousse-café, doesn’t necessarily refer to layered drinks, instead simply referring to liqueur drunk after coffee. To quote eGullet.org’s MaxH, “It’s standard informal French for a liqueur served after coffee (like something that pushes the coffee down). I’ve seen Europeans surprised to hear that US bartenders understand the word in the special sense of a layered cocktail.”

So, if you’re feeling particularly retro and decadent at your next dinner party, and no one is driving, why not get the liqueur bottles out to accompany the coffee?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Angel’s Wing Cocktail

Angel’s Wing Cocktail

1/2 Crème de Cacao. (Bols)
1/2 Prunelle Brandy. (Home made Sugar Plum Liqueur)

Use liqueur glass and pour ingredients carefully so that they do not mix. Pour a little sweet, cream on top.

Even this one wasn’t so bad, really. I think it was just shoe horning that violette in with the darker flavors of plum and chocolate in the Angel’s Kiss that got me.

I mean, obviously, this drink is very sweet and meant as an after dinner thing, to be drunk with coffee.

I ran across an interesting passage in the 1948 edition of “Bartender’s Guide by Trader Vic.”

Another ass who makes bartenders blow their corks is the show-off who orders fancy drinks–usually when the bar is crowded and the rush is on–just to impress his companions. I almost lost one of my best men one night; it took three guys to hold him when one such nit-wit ordered an eight-color Pousse-Cafe. The bartender sweat bullets getting the damn thing cooked up; spoiled the first two because he couldn’t remember which liqueurs were the heaviest (you get an order for one of the fool things about once every five years), but he finally sent it to the table with pride. It was beautiful, glowing with color. And what did the guy do but display it to his friends and then down it with one gulp like a straight shot! In case there’s anyone who doesn’t know how to drink a Pousse-Cafe, it should be sipped, one color at a time.

So whatever you do, don’t order one of these layered shots when a bar is busy!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Angel’s Tip Cocktail

Angel’s Tip Cocktail

3/4 Liqueur Glass Crème de Cacao.
1/4 Fresh Cream.

Use liqueur glass and float cream.

Another layered after dinner cocktail.

The Angel’s Tip is not nearly as vile as the Angel’s Kiss. I would call this one at least “drinkable.”

I still recommend you have a glass of coffee or tea nearby to cut the sweetness.

Heck, if it wasn’t so much work to layer the stupid thing, (this one’s really not,) I’d say pour it right in your coffee!

Some books recommend chilling the liqueurs and/or liquors before making layered cocktails. Seems a bit persnickety to me, but it is probably not an horrible idea.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Angel’s Kiss Cocktail

Angel’s Kiss Cocktail

1/4 Crème de Cacao. (Bols)
1/4 Prunelle Brandy. (Home made Sugar Plum liqueur)
1/4 Crème de Violette. (Benoit-Serres Liqueur de Violette)
1/4 Sweet Cream.

Use liqueur Glass and pour carefully, so that ingredients do not mix.

I try to give Savoy Cocktail Book cocktails a fair shake, but this is just vile. I can’t imagine anyone enjoying it. Bleah!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.