Sloeberry Cocktail

035

Sloeberry Cocktail
1 Dash Angostura Bitters. (1 dash Angostura)
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (1 dash The Bitter Truth Orange Bitters)
1 glass Sloe Gin. (1 oz Plymouth gin, 1 oz Plymouth Sloe Gin)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Again!? Someone cut the Sloe Gin with Plymouth Gin! My god, what is going on here!?

I thought this was some sort of documentary effort?

Sadly, even cutting the Sloe Gin with regular Plymouth Gin didn’t help much here in the Sloeberry. Far too medicinal for my taste. Though, adding a dash of orange and a dash of ango to the previous Sloe Gin Cocktail, hm…

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sloe Gin Cocktail

025

Sloe Gin Cocktail
1/4 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica Italian Vermouth)
1/2 Sloe Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin, 3/4 oz Plymouth Sloe Gin)
Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.

What the!? Now how did that happen? Someone cut the Plymouth Sloe Gin in this cocktail with half regular Plymouth Gin. Clearly, that is all wrong, and someone should be punished. Perhaps by drinking this cocktail made with all Sloe Gin.

As written above, this is quite nice, a sort of berry-ish light Negroni.  I suppose I should think of a new name.

Sloe Gin-Gin Cocktail?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Savoy Tango Cocktail

029

Savoy Tango Cocktail
1/2 Sloe Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Sloe Gin)
1/2 Applejack or Calvados. (1 oz Calvados Groult Reserve)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Note: This cocktail is a very great favourite at the Savoy Hotel, London, where it was invented.

That’s kind of a mind-blower, eh?

This simple combination of Sloe Gin and Apple Brandy is noted as, “a very great favourite at the Savoy Hotel”?

Well, first, if you don’t have a decent Sloe Gin, like the Plymouth, don’t even bother.

For my money, the complexity of a lightly aged Calvados, like this Roger Groult, adds a bit more character to the cocktail than an American Apple Brandy.

Still, a “great favorite”? Bartenders whipping out dozens of these puppies a night?

Well, OK, it is a very good name. And if you like Sloe Gin, which I understand the English do, this is an interesting flavor combination. I guess those two factors alone might go a long way towards explaining its alleged popularity.

Kind of tough, though, to taste this and wrap your mind around it being a “great favourite”.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Ping-Pong Special Cocktail

Ping-Pong Special Cocktail

Ping-Pong Special Cocktail.
(6 people)
Carefully shake (I stirred) together 3 glasses of Sloe Gin (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Sloe Gin) and 3 glasses of Italian vermouth (1 1/2 oz Martini and Rossi Sweet Vermouth), with half a dessertspoonful of Angostura Bitters (dash angosutura Bitters) and a dessertspoonful of sugar syrup or Curacao (dash Bols Dry Orange Curacao). Serve with a (Luxardo) cherry and a piece of lemon rind.

In his book, “Cocktails: How to Mix Them,” Robert Vermeire tells us, “This is a Manhattan Cocktail with Sloe Gin instead of Rye Whiskey. (Recipe by Boothby of San Francisco.)”

A bit sweet, but this one I can get into much more than the previous “Ping-Pong”. Vermouth and Sloe Gin is a much preferable combination to me, than Creme de Violette and Sloe Gin.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Ping-Pong Cocktail

Ping-Pong Cocktail

Ping-Pong Cocktail.

The Juice of 1/4 Lemon.
1/2 Sloe Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Sloe Gin)
1/2 Crème Yvette. (1 oz Benoit Serres liqueur de violette)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Harry McElhone tell us this cocktail recipe was created by “James G. Bennet, Broken Heart Café, 16 South Broadway, St. Louis, Mo., 1903.” Tasting this cocktail, I am not sure if I would be so quick to claim it.

Basically, the Ping-Pong looks and tastes like a perfumey glass of concord grape juice. And not in a good way. As if your blue haired grandmother spilled her toilet water in your glass.

Not really something I would recommend.

Though, I suppose there is some remote chance that this would be somewhat more palatable if made with proper Creme Yvette, instead of violet liqueur.

Personally, I think the chances are slim. But if someone wants to send me some Creme Yvette, I’ll be glad to try this one again.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Moll Cocktail

Moll Cocktail

Moll Cocktail

(6 People)
2 Glasses Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin)
2 Glasses Sloe Gin. (3/4 oz Lindesfarne Sloe Gin)
2 Glasses French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
Add a few drops of Orange Bitters (1 drop Angostura Orange Bitters) and sugar (dash Depaz Cane Syrup) to taste.

Shake (stir?) and serve in cocktail glasses.

Vermouth, strangely, seemed to be the dominant element in the Moll cocktail.

A perfectly fine, if a bit dull, cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

McClelland Cocktail

McClelland Cocktail

McClelland Cocktail

1 Dash Absinthe. (1/3 tsp. Kübler Absinthe)
1/3 Curacao. (3/4 oz Bols Dry Orange Curaçao. Thanks Philip!)
2/3 Sloe Gin. (1 1/2 oz Lindisfarne Sloe Gin)

Shake (or stir?) well and strain into cocktail glass.

You would think this would be pretty darn close to undrinkable. It is pretty inky. However, the bitterness and sweet tart nature of the Sloe Gin puts it not far from a Late Bottle Vintage Port. An enjoyable combination of flavors, but definitely an after dinner drink.

LindisFarne

The last time I was in England I stopped at Gerry’s Wines & Spirits and asked about Plymouth Sloe Gin. Unfortunately, they were out of stock at the time. They suggested perhaps trying the Lindisfarne and whispered, “it’s better anyway.” I dunno if it is better, but it is more intensely Sloe flavored.

Interestingly, Lindisfarne is a tidal island only accessible by boat or by road just some of the time.

A TIDAL ISLAND: Holy Island is linked to the mainland by a long causeway. Twice each day the tide sweeps in from the North Sea and covers the road. Tide times and heights can be accurately predicted from the phases of the Moon. Severe weather can produce offsets, particularly with strong winds from the North and Northeast. The causeway crossing times are forecasted ‘safe’ crossing times. Nevertheless, travellers should remain vigilant if crossing near the extremeties.

Apparently, Lindisfarne also played an important role in the Christian Church’s early days in England somewhere around 635 AD.

The Golden Age of Lindisfarne: The period of the first monastery is referred to as the “Golden Age” of Lindisfarne. Aidan and his monks came from the Irish monastery of Iona and with the support of King Oswald (based at nearby Bamburgh) worked as missionaries among the pagan English of Northumbria. In their monastery they set up the first known school in this area and introduced the arts of reading and writing, the Latin language and the Bible and other Christian books (all in Latin). They trained boys as practical missionaries who later went out over much of England to spread the Gospel.

Not sure which McClelland this cocktail might refer to. Joe McClelland seems like an English possibility. McClelland Barclay seems like a good American possibility.

Or perhaps George B. McClelland, aka Diamond Dick?

“DIAMOND DICK” IS DEAD.; George B. McClelland, Known to Boys as Hero of Many a Dime Novel.

NY Times
December 16, 1911, Saturday

Page 18, 380 words

OGDENSBURG, N.Y., Dec. 15. — Word was received here to-day of the death last night in Kansas of George B. McClelland, better known as “Diamond Dick,” famous in dime novel lore, from injuries received in being run down by a train while driving over a railroad crossing.

I guess my money’s on the last…

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.