Keep Sober Cocktail

Keep Sober Cocktail

1/8 Grenadine. (Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1/8 Sirop-de-Citron (Sirop-de-Citron, homemade)
3/4 Tonic. (Clayton’s Kola Tonic)

Serve in long glass and fill with siphon soda.

This one isn’t bad either, ending up tasting rather like a Cherry-Coke, though it wouldn’t be awful to include a little citrus.

Another interesting experiment I tried was mixing in Trader Tiki’s Don’s Mix, instead of the Grenadine. You know, you have to support your friends. Anyway, I found that to be a quite interesting variation, a little spice and a little citric tang, gave this a bit more of a tropical theme and made it a pretty decent non-alcoholic cocktail.

Now if I could only convince Blair from Trader Tiki or Jennifer from Small Hand Foods to make a Kola Tonic, so I don’t have to order it from Barbados next time!

I mean, if you have to Keep Sober, it doesn’t mean you have to suffer.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Clayton’s Temperence Cocktail


Clayton’s Temperance Cocktail
1/4 Sirop-de-citron. (Sirop-de-Citron, homemade)
3/4 Kola Tonic. (Clayton’s Kola Tonic)
Shake well and serve in cocktail glass. (Or build in a glass and top with chilled soda water.)

Not that interesting, just kind of tastes like too sweet lemony cola. Some lime juice (and a splash of High West Rendezvous Rye) rendered it somewhat more palatable. Still, the Pussyfoot was definitely the better cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Clayton’s Pussyfoot Cocktail

Well, the first section after the 700 and some odd “Cocktails” is, drumroll…

Non-Alcoholic Cocktails

Actually, I wish there were some more exciting cocktails here, but most seem to have been cribbed from a “Clayton’s Kola Tonic” brochure.

“Claytons. The drink you have when you’re not having a drink.”

Clayton’s Pussyfoot Cocktail
1/4 Sirop-de-citron. (Sirop-de-Citron, homemade)
1/4 Orange Juice. (Blood Orange Juice)
1/2 Kola Tonic. (Clayton’s Kola Tonic)
Shake well and serve in cocktail glass. (Or build in a short glass and top with chilled soda water.)

These sorts of cocktails, with my really intense and sweet Sirop-de-Citron, I just find to be too concentrated in flavor to be served as “up” cocktails. I much prefer them built with soda water instead, even over ice.

The Clayton’s Pussyfoot is actually darn tasty. I might, or might not, recommend slipping a splash of Rye Whiskey in there, just to juice it up, but certainly, not very much, especially with that name.

Hey, check out the new Schott-Zwiesel glassware. It’s from the Schumann Basic Bar collection. I really like these little glasses. Perfect size for a 19th Century highball or a glass of vermouth while making dinner. They really remind me of some of the vintage highball glassware I’ve seen. Also, they were on sale, so cool!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

White Baby Cocktail

White Baby cocktail
1/2 Gin. (1 oz Ransom Old Tom Gin)
1/4 Cointreau. (1/2 oz Cointreau)
1/4 Sirop-de-Citron (1/2 oz Homemade Sirop-de-Citron)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

There’s a quote in the Savoy Cocktail Book that goes with this cocktail, but I think it best for all of us, if I will leave it to your enterprising fingers to search out.

I used the Ransom to provide a couple more layers of character along with the citrus elements.

With the Ransom and homemeade Sirop-de-Citron this doesn’t have bad flavor at all, but really could have used a bit of lemon juice to spruce it up.

It’s just too sweet as it is, a liquid lemon life saver.

Might be good warm, if you have a cold or sore throat, otherwise, add a dash of fresh lemon juice.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Summer Time Cocktail

Summer Time Cocktail
3/4 Gin. (1 1/2 oz Sarticious Gin)
1/4 Sirop-de-citron. (1/2 oz Homemade Sirop-de-Citron)
Shake well and strain into medium size glass; fill up with soda water.

You may recall my schtick on the South-Side Cocktail: soda if you’ve got some time and straight up if you don’t.  Well, in this case I was trying to get a Savoy Cocktail made and photographed before heading out to meet some friends.  No time for soda!

Kind of regretted that decision.  Where I can see how this would have been OK as a long drink, as a short drink it was too sweet and concentrated.  A lemon life saver of a drink.  A half ounce of lemon juice would have brightened this a lot, and gone a long way towards making it palatable.

I used the Sarticious Gin, solely because I knew in the near future I would be trying the new gin from the same distiller, Blade, and I wanted to have it fresh in my mind.

Trying the Blade, there is a serious family resemblance.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sirop-de-Citron

One ingredient I’ve kind of put off making is Sirop-de-Citron.

Not because it is particularly or challenging to manufacture, but mostly because I have a bottle of Monin Lemon Syrup I’ve barely put a dent in.

However, I’ve never really been thrilled with the drinks I’ve made with the Monin Syrup.

Clayton's Kola Tonic.

With the recent arrival of Clayton’s Kola Tonic, an ingredient commonly combined with Sirop-de-Citron, it seemed like a good opportunity to revisit. Plus, it’s Lemon season.

Source recipes:

La Cuisine de Jardin

Pause Cuisine

Sirop-de-Citron

Ingredients:

5 Lemons
1kg Natural Sugar
Water

Method: Slice lemons, (note deadly ceramic Mandolin in foreground and cut resistant glove in background,) toss with sugar and place in a clean container.

Let stand for 2-3 days.

Add mixture to a sauce pan and bring to a simmer.

Strain through cheesecloth.

If you desire, save now candied peel, dehydrate and store in a sealed container.

Strain into clean 750ml bottle, fill with water.  Refrigerate, (though with this much sugar to liquid, I really doubt much is going to happen here,) and serve with soda water or where Sirop-de-Citron is called for.

Comparing the Monin and home-made, it is really apparent the Monin syrup has been pumped up with Ascorbic Acid.  It is pretty extreme in it’s lemon flavor.  The home made is more natural tasting, though with a bit of a bitter after taste from the inclusion of the pith in maceration.  For those very picky about bitterness, I did find some fancy pants, pastry chef type recipes which zest the lemon peel, juice the lemons, and use this to create the syrup.  Personally, I don’t mind the bitter after taste, and hope it lends some zip to drinks like the Big Boy, Clayton’s, Filmograph, Marvel, Pink Baby, and Re-Vigorator.

Re-Vigorator Cocktail

Re-Vigorator Cocktail

Re-Vigorator Cocktail.
1/2 Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/4 Kola Tonic. (Scant 1/2 oz Rose’s Cola Tonic)
1/4 Sirop-de-citron. (1/4 oz Lemon Juice, 1/4 oz Monin Lemon Syrup)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Cheating slightly, as I just can’t face these Kola Tonic and Sirop-de-Citron cocktails without a little bit of citrus juice.

This isn’t, strictly speaking, awful. On the other hand, it isn’t that great, either. Definitely on the Saccharine side, like a vaguely medicinal lemon flavored hard candy.

Good name, though!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Pink Baby Cocktail

Pink Baby Cocktail

Pink Baby Cocktail.

1/2 Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/4 Grenadine. (1/2 oz homemade Grenadine)
1/4 Sirop-de-citron. (1/4 oz Monin Lemon Syrup, 1/4 oz Lemon Juice)
The White of 1 Egg.

Shake well and strain into medium size glass.

Sorry, I find I just can’t hang with these “Sirop-de-Citron” cocktails with no fresh citrus. Maybe if I made my own Sirop de Citron, it would have enough bitter lemon character from the peel that it would be tasty. But just using Monin Lemon Syrup, these cocktails just aren’t that good.

Anyway, the best looking recipe I’ve found for Sirop de Citron is here:

Sirop de Citron Maison

Essentially, you slice a bunch of lemons and then preserve them by completely covering them with sugar.  The recipe on the above page calls for: 3 lemons sliced thin covered with 400 grams sugar and macerated at room temp for 3 or 4 days.  Bring to a boil and strain out the solids.

I can see how that would be quite different from the lemon syrup we typically get from Monin or Torani.

Anyway, back to the Pink Baby.  As written above, she’s not bad at all.  In fact, quite delicious, perhaps the most promising of the various upcoming “pink” cocktails.  We shall see!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Marvel Cocktail

Marvel Cocktail

The Marvel Cocktail

3/4 Jamaica Rum. (1 1/2 oz Coruba Rum)
1/8 Sirop-de-citron. (1/4 oz Monin Lemon Syrup)
1/8 Grenadine. (1/4 oz Homemade Grenadine)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Previously I have made these sorts of Grenadine and Rum drinks with Appleton V/X.

I have to admit, trying the Marvel with the Coruba Rum, the flavor combination makes a lot more sense.

It’s just a lot more funky and flavorful rum for this application than the Appleton is.

I’m gonna have to go back and try the Chinese Cocktail again.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Filmograph Cocktail

Filmograph Cocktail

1/2 Brandy. (1 oz Cerbois VSOP Armagnac)
1/4 Kola Tonic. (1/2 oz Rose’s Kola Tonic)
1/4 Sirop-de-citron. (1/2 oz Monin Lemon Syrup)

Shake, (well, stir, I suppose,) and strain into cocktail glass.

I know I promised to make my own Sirop-de-Citron the next time one of the cocktails called for it. And it is even lemon season. Sadly I have failed. And sadly failed this drink. At least with the Monin Lemon Syrup, this is the equivalent of some sort of very sweet hard candy with the Kola Tonic giving it a lovely medicinal edge. Cough Drop in liquid form. It’s hard for me to see this as anything other than a waste of a delicious Brandy.

Earlier in the day, a friend had called. Asking if I happened to have any Armagnac. It isn’t odd for him to ask me for a couple ounces of drink ingredients, as I know he is currently making drinks as part of his personal obsessive-compulsive project to make all the recipes from the “Joy of Cooking”. But, I did think it a bit odd to ask about Armagnac. I mean, there really aren’t that many cocktails that specify Armagnac. Why would they include one with the dozen or so cocktails in the Joy of Cooking? Turns out it is a Sidecar variation which they are inexplicably calling an “Armored Car,” (every google I do for “Armored Car” and “cocktail” turns up tequila and amaretto.)

My friend came over, and I made him an Armagnac Sidecar (2-1-1) with the Cerbois, Cointreau, and fresh lemon juice. Damn, if it wasn’t the best Sidecar I’ve ever made. I’ve actually always thought it a bit of a waste to use a too nice Brandy in Sidecars, as it often gets plowed over by the Cointreau and Lemon. The Armagnac really puts up a fight!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.