Greenbriar Cocktail

Greenbriar Cocktail.

1 Dash Peach Bitters. (Fee’s Peach Bitters)
1/3 French vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
2/3 Sherry. (Bodega Dios Baco Fino Sherry)
1 Sprig Fresh Mint.

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Garnish with Mint tip.)

Pretty weird, and the peach bitters and mint make it seem awfully girly, but not unpleasant. Somehow, I could imagine the Greenbriar going well with Middle Eastern food. Especially Feta Cheese and maybe Baba Ghanoush. Not sure exactly why.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Dunlop Cocktail

Edit: Retranslated in honor of International Talk Like a Pirate Day.

Dunlop Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1/3 Sherry. (3/4 oz Don Nuno Dry Oloroso Sherry)
2/3 Rum. (1 1/2 oz Diplomatico Rum)

Stir well an’ strain into cocktail glass. (Squeeze lemon peel o’er glass)

Pretty wide open drink here on th’ ingredient fore. At least ‘t specifies which type o’ bitters!

I started by pickin’ th’ sherry, an’ then headed down t’ th’ garage t’ investigate th’ smells o’ th’ various rums I be havin’ stored down thar. I be thinkin’ dark an’ dry in combination wi’ th’ Sherry, an’ th’ Diplomatico stuck ou’ as an interestin’ combination.

Ended up quite tasty, but really needed th’ added aromatic zip o’ th’ peel t’ brin’ th’ drink t’ life.

This post be one in a series documentin’ me ongoin’ effort t’ make all o’ th’ cocktails in th’ Savoy Cocktail Book, startin’ at th’ first, Abbey, an’ endin’ at th’ last, Zed.

Dunhill’s Special Cocktail

Dunhill’s Special Cocktail
(6 People)

In a shaker filled with cracked Ice place a spoonful of Curacao (Dash Brizard Orange Curacao), 2 glasses of Gin (1 oz Beefeater Gin), 2 glasses of Sherry (1 oz Fino Sherry), 2 glasses of French Vermouth (1 oz Dolin Vermouth). Stir thoroughly with a spoon, shake, strain, and serve. Add an olive (uh, oops!) and 2 dashes of Absinthe (Verte de Fougerolles) to each glass.

As usual downsizing this to a single (slightly large) portion.

Aside from the puzzling directive to, “stir…shake, strain and serve,” this cocktail’s ingredients intrigued me. And indeed, served to illustrate another side to Absinthe’s flavors.

In this case, the combination highlighted the savory aspects of the ingredients, almost to the point where it tasted like an Aquavit cocktail instead of a Gin cocktail. I’d definitely swear there was some caraway in there somehow.

A very nice dry cocktail, that I could imagine going well with food of some sort.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Duke of Marlborough Cocktail

Duke of Marlborough Cocktail

1/2 Sherry. (Fino)
1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 1/2 oz Punt e Mes)
3 Dashes Orange Bitters. (Dash or two of Fee’s, Dash or two of Regan’s)

Stir well and twist orange peel on top.

Cheating slightly here by using Punt e Mes instead of regular Sweet Vermouth and as always making the vermouth cocktails on cracked ice instead of up.

I guess the question is, which of the 10 (at the time) Dukes of Marlborough this was named after. It appears likely that they were a Spencer, Churchill, or Spencer-Churchill. The seventh, John Winston Spencer-Churchill, 1822–1883, was the paternal Grandfather of Sir Winston Churchill.

With Punt e Mes, this is quite tasty. Almost Americano-like. Still, I wouldn’t blame you if you chose to add an ounce or so of Gin. I have no doubt that Sir Winston would. Though, now that I think about it, he might just glance at the bottles of Sherry and Vermouth, shrug, and pour himself a big glass of plain gin.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Cupid Cocktail

Cupid Cocktail

Cupid Cocktail

1 Glass Sherry. (2 oz Lustau Don Nuno Dry Oloroso)
1 Fresh Egg.
Teaspoonful Powdered Sugar. (1 tsp. caster sugar)
A little Cayenne Pepper.

Shake well and strain into medium size glass.

Sherry Flip, essentially. The cayenne pepper give it an interesting little kick.

Not overly complex or anything; but enjoyable all the same.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Coronation Cocktail (No. 1)

Coronation Cocktail (No. 1)

Coronation Cocktail (No. 1)

1/2 Sherry. (1 1/2 oz Domecq La Ina Fino Sherry)
1/2 French Vermouth. (1 1/2 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)
1 Dash Maraschino. (Luxardo)
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (1 dash Regan’s, 1 dash Fee’s)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Again, prefer to build these sorts of things over rocks, so there you go.

This was really nice. I think I am coming around to dry sherry.

Earlier in the evening, I had been experimenting with Aviation proportions and different violet liqueurs. Palate was pretty jaded from it all. This was a pleasant, simple, relief from all that perfumed nonsense.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Forbidden Island Field Trip

One of the drinks included in “Food & Wine Cocktails 2008″ is Martin Cate’s version of the classic Trader Vic drink the Fog Cutter

Forbidden Island

Taking the opportunity of a friend’s band (The awesome Project Pimento!) playing at Forbidden Island, I stopped by to try the drink in question.

Fog Cutter

Le Fog Cutter. Tasty! I’d not tried one before. It was fruitier than I expected, with a good amount of the drink’s character coming from the Orgeat. I don’t have the book handy, but it has always struck me as an unlikely combination of ingredients, especially for a Tiki Drink. Most recipes include: Brandy, Gin, Rum, Sherry, Orgeat Syrup, and Orange Juice. Sometimes lemon. Somehow it all works!

Martin & I*

I am such a bartender stalker! Anyway, Martin went on to explain how interesting it is to track the sweetness and different character of the Fog Cutter through the seasons. They’re on late season Navel oranges right now, giving the drink a sweeter character. He said pretty soon they’d be switching to Valencias, which would be quite tart in the early part of the season and then mellow as the summer went on.

FGCUTTR*

Martin even brought in his old FGCUTTR license plate for photographic documentation.

*Humuhumu took these pictures.

Byculla Cocktail

Byculla Cocktail

1 Liqueur Glass Ginger (3/4 oz Canton Ginger Liqueur)
1 Liqueur Glass Curacao (3/4 oz Brizard Orange Curacao)
1 Liqueur Glass Port (3/4 oz Warre’s Warrior Port)
1 Liqueur Glass Sherry (3/4 oz Lustau Don Nuno Dry Oloroso)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Too sweet to be anything other than a dessert cocktail. I like the flavor combination, though. Definitely filed away for future use.

Byculla appears to have been a popular neighborhood with the British of Mumbai (Bombay) from a period of around 1800 to the 1890. Race Track, Clubs, that sort of thing.

So decadent, that there was even a famous Byculla Soufflé:

The Byculla Soufflé – a very Edwardian dish, the pride of the Byculla Club in Bombay; a sweet mousse in which layers of cream are flavoured with different liqueurs – Chartreuese, Benedictine and Maraschino – and set with gelatine. Since the Byculla Club ceased to exist in 1920, to the best of my knowledge so did the Byculla Soufflé; but maybe some reader can correct me.

Yowza, a layered liqueur flavored soufflé sounds kind of fun!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Brazil Cocktail

Brazil Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters
1 Dash Absinthe (1/4 barspoon Verte de Fougerolles Absinthe)
1/2 French Vermouth (2 oz Noilly Prat)
1/2 Sherry (2 oz Lustau Solera Reserva Dry Oloroso Sherry “Don Nuño”)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

The Absinthe and Lemon add a nice flavor to the Sherry and Vermouth. The flavors were actually more interesting as it warmed in the glass than when I first poured it. Still, not something I would likely choose to sample again.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Balm Cocktail

Balm Cocktail
(6 People)

1/2 Glass Orange Juice. (1/2 oz fresh squeezed)
1/2 Glass Cointreau (1/2 oz)
3 Glasses sherry. (3 oz Lustau Don Nuno Dry Oloroso)
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (Regan’s)
2 Dashes Pimento Dram liqueur. (Homemade)

Fill up the shaker with cracked ice shake and serve with an olive.

The olive garnish doesn’t make any sense to me. Also not sure if this is the appropriate Sherry. But, I’m still coming to terms with Dry Sherries.

In any case, this isn’t a bad cocktail, if you like orange, spice, and sherry. Just isn’t quite as short and sharp as a the usual liquor based cocktails. A pleasant appetizer cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.