Buck’s Fizz

As usual, I got home and did the prep for this evening’s dinner. This time, arborio rice with fresh porcini mushroom and smoked salmon.

Soak dry mushrooms. Brunoise of carrots and onions. Washed and sliced leeks. Sliced fresh porcini. Drain Mushrooms, reserving soaking liquid. Mince dried mushrooms. Crumble smoked salmon. Chop fresh herbs.

After getting that in the can, I filmed the week’s cocktail, the Buck’s Fizz.

Bucks Fizz
Use long tumbler.
1/4 Glass Orange Juice.
Fill with Champagne.

My plan was to:

Rinse glass with Miracle Mile Orange Bitters, pour bitters into mixing glass.

Make Buck’s Fizz in bitters rinsed glass.

Then make a real drink with orange bitters, like a Martini… Oh crap, I have no Dry Vermouth.

Well, make the unjustly ignored Jabberwock Cocktail instead, since I have Gin, Sherry, and Cocchi Americano.

Jabberwock Cocktail*
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (Miracle Mile Orange Bitters)
1/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Junipero Gin)
1/3 Dry Sherry. (3/4 oz Manzanilla Sherry)
1/3 Caperitif. (3/4 oz Cocchi Americano or Lillet Blanc)
Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon (er, orange) peel on top.
* This will made you gyre and gamble in the wabe until brillig all right, all right.

So, Buck’s Fizz. Isn’t that just a Mimosa? Well, sometimes you’ll see Buck’s Fizz variations which include Cherry Heering, Orange Liqueur, Gin, or Grenadine and most Mimosas are equal parts orange juice and champagne, but, yep, at it’s most basic, The Buck’s Fizz is a fairly dry version of the Mimosa. Or the Mimosa is a Orange Juice heavy Buck’s Fizz.

Is there anything wrong with spiking your champagne with a little Vitamin C?

Always a mess. Clean up, upload photos and video.

Make the dressing for the tomato salad. Slice Tomatoes. Wash greens.

Put reserved mushroom soaking liquid over low heat and add additional chicken or vegetable stock. Heat 2 saute pans. In one large enough to hold your rice dish, add oil and 1 cup arborio rice. Heat until toasted and fragrant. Add carrot and onion brunoise, toss and cook until tender. Add chicken stock and cook until rice is nearly tender, adding more stock as necessary. While this is going on, saute your porcini mushrooms, when they have given up most of their liquid, add the leeks. Remove from heat and reserve. When rice is nearly tender, add the minced dried mushrooms, sauteed mixture, and herbs. Stir in some grated cheese, if you like, and the crumbled salmon. Top with a little more grated cheese and serve while warm. Toss salad and serve with warm crusty bread.

Music in the video is from the new Amon Tobin CD, “ISAM”.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Sherry Sangaree

Sherry Sangaree
Use small bar glass.
1 Wineglass of Sherry. (2 oz Solear Manzanilla Sherry)
1 Teaspoonful of Fine Sugar. (1 Teaspon Caster Sugar)
Fill tumbler 1/3 with ice, and grate nutmeg on top.

Sorry, was kind of grumpy looking in the video. I made it once, and didn’t realize the batteries on my camera had given out. Then realized the spare batteries weren’t charged, either. Ran around the house looking for actual AA Batteries, only to find those were all dead, too. Fortunately, by that time, the rechargeables had gotten enough charge to record the brief video.

Anyway, after writing the last post, I thought to myself, “Hey, Self, you should look this up in David Wondrich’s Imbibe!: From Absinthe Cocktail to Whiskey Smash, a Salute in Stories and Drinks to “Professor” Jerry Thomas, Pioneer of the American Bar. and see if he has anything to say about Sangarees.”

And, even though the Sangaree was an Old Fashioned drink by the time Jerry Thomas wrote his book, they are covered.

This is my favorite part of Mr. Wondrich’s writeup, “As longtime East Coast bartender Jere Sullivan recalled in 1930, ‘In the Author’s experience it was found principally the order of the elderly business man, after the counters were closed in the late afternoon.’ But not every drink has to play the classic American go-getter, all youth and drive and swagger. The Sangaree maintains a certain Old-World courtliness that has its appeal.”

Well, that and his comment, “Sangaree…was drunk in Britain by gentlemen and sea-captains and in America by infants, invalids, and Indians.”

Chuckle.

Here’s Jerry Thomas’ version:

Sherry Sangaree.
(Use medium bar-glass.)
Take 1 claret glass of Sherry wine.
½ tea-spoonful of fine white sugar.
2 or 3 small lumps of ice.

Shake up well, strain into a small bar-glass, serve with a little grated nutmeg.

The one thing, I think that Thomas and the Savoy miss out on, is that the drink should be milder than just being shaken with ice. I mean look at the Miss Leslie version referenced in the Savoy Sangaree recipe, “2/3 Water, 1/3 Sherry”! That is a very mild drink. So, in both the Savoy Sangaree I made and this Sherry Sangaree, I’ve added about an ounce of Sparkling water to the 2 oz of fortified wine I’ve stirred briefly on a cube.

Maybe I’m heading towards “Elderly Business Man” status, myself, but I have to admit I quite enjoyed all the Sangarees I’ve made so far, including this one with Sherry.

The music is from a CD called “Moa Anbessa” by Dutch group The Ex and Ethiopian saxophonist Getatchew Mekuria.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Xeres Cocktail

Xeres Cocktail
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (1 dash Angostura Orange Bitters)
1 Dash Peach Bitters. (1 dash Fee’s Peach Bitters)
1 Glass Sherry. (2 oz Blandy’s 5 Year Alvada Madeira)
Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.

I just couldn’t find a Sherry I wanted to drink during the day before the night I had to make this.

On the other hand, I had this Madeira sitting around…

Swap one Old Wine for another?

Why not? I’ve never really bonded with most Sherry, anyway.

Wow, tasty!

Feel a little bad about messing with such a tasty Madeira, but all the same, a more than pleasing cocktail.

And, I got to share the rest of the bottle with Mrs. Flannestad after dinner!

A win for both of us.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Up-To-Date Cocktail

Up-To-Date Cocktail
2 Dashes Grand Marnier. (5ml or 1 tsp. Grand Marnier)
2 Dashes Angostura Bitters. (2 dashes Angostura Bitters)
1/2 Sherry. (1 oz Solear Manzanilla Sherry)
1/2 Canadian Club Whisky. (1 oz 40 Creek 3 Grain Canadian Whisky)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Hey, this cocktail from Hugo Ensslin’s 1917 cocktail book “Recipes for Mixed Drinks” is pretty darn tasty.

I was afraid it would be a little plain, or that the sherry would get overwhelmed, but it is quite nice, with both the whisky and sherry showing nicely.

With computers, it is always important to keep up-to-date, so it goes with cocktails.

Gotta keep up with what the kids are up to. Heck, sherry is even a trendy ingredient again, you could make this fairly mild whisky cocktail and still seem up to date.

Plus, one of the very few cocktails, outside of the Cadillac Margarita, which gives you a justified reason to use Grand Marnier. If you can’t find decent Canadian Whisky, use Rye. You’ll thank me later.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Straight Law Cocktail

Straight Law Cocktail
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Hayman’s Old Tom Gin)
2/3 Dry Sherry. (1 1/2 oz Dry Sack Sherry)
Shake well (I stirred, briefly) and strain into cocktail glass. (Orange Peel.)

Trying to think of something interesting to do with this sort of reverse sherry Martini, I thought it might be fun to use the botanically intense Hayman’s in the cocktail.

It turned out interesting, but it really isn’t anything to write home about. An enjoyable, light appetizer and that’s about it. Sherry with a “stick”, if you will.

Such a good name, though. Really do wish it belonged to a better cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Ship Cocktail

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Ship Cocktail
(6 People)
4 Glasses Sherry. (2 oz Williams Humbert Dry Sack)
1 Glass Whisky. (1/2 oz Pig’s Nose Scotch*)
1 Glass Rum. (1/2 oz Smith & Cross Jamaican Rum)
1 Glass Prune Syrup. (1/2 oz Prune Syrup)
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (1 dash Bitter Truth Orange Bitters)
A little Sugar if desired. (None desired)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Since the cocktail, doesn’t specify what sorts of Whisky or Rum to use, I decided to go a bit avant garde and use Scotch Whisky and Jamaican Rum. Anyway, it is a Ship Cocktail. You gotta use Pirate Rum in a Ship Cocktail!

Interestingly, this turns out to be tasty, if you enjoy the flavors of the component spirits. The Sherry and Prune Syrup seem to act like flavor enhancers, extending and complementing the others. Nice, actually, probably one of my favorite recent Savoy Cocktails. Not that I expect that this endorsement will have a host of other cocktail bloggers running for the kitchen to make themselves prune syrup. Yer missing out, I tell you! It’s a very tasty sweetener, and those prunes stewed in port are tasty! Regularity, it is important, as you get older.

*Note, the teeny, tiny bottle of Pig’s Nose Scotch was sent to me by a marketing firm promoting the brand.  Tasty stuff!  I bet it is even tastier when poured from a 750ml bottle!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sherry Twist Cocktail (No. 2)

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Sherry Twist Cocktail (No. 2)

(6 People)

Take the juice of 1 Orange (1/2 oz Orange Juice), 2 glasses of Whisky (1 oz Sazerac Straight Rye Whiskey), 2 1/2 glasses of Sherry (1 1/2 oz Williams Humbert Dry Sack) and 1/2 glass of Cointreau (1/4 oz Cointreau). Add two cloves (bare drop clove oil), squeeze in the juice of 1/4 lemon (1/4 oz Lemon Juice), and add half a turn of the pepper-mill (pinch cayenne pepper). Fill the shaker with cracked ice. Shake and serve.

And you thought Sherry Twist (No. 1) was weird! I found a recipe for this one in Patrick Gavin Duffy’s “Official Mixer’s Manual” which called for “a little cayenne”, instead of the black pepper in the Savoy drink. As Duffy is usually a more accurate transcriber of other’s recipes, I went with his recommendation. Also, my cloves are kind of old and tired, so I went with a touch of clove oil instead.

A similar cocktail to Sherry Twist (No. 1), this is also a sort of spiced Sherry punch for 1. It is also fairly similar in character, on the light side with a mild acidity and not much sweetness. The Cayenne gives it a little prickliness. Not sure which I preferred, perhaps No. 1, as it is a bit less complex. Still, No. 2 isn’t bad either, and both are fairly unique.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sherry Twist Cocktail (No. 1)

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Sherry Twist Cocktail (No. 1)
(6 People)
1 Glass Brandy. (1/2 oz Germain-Robin Fine Alembic Brandy)
1 Glass French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)
3 Glasses Sherry. (1 1/2 oz Williams Humbert Dry Sack)
2/3 Glass Cointreau. (1/3 oz Cointreau)
1/3 Glass Lemon Juice. (1/6 oz Lemon Juice)
1 Small Piece Cinnamon. (1 Small Piece Cinnamon)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Shave cinnamon over glass with microplane and serve.)

Just shaking with a “small piece of cinnamon” didn’t seem like it would get much character into the cocktail, so I added a little more as a garnish. As you can see, after all my complaining about pale dry sherries, I have gone ahead and gotten something a little closer to what I imagine might actually be used, Williams Humbert Dry Sack. Oddly, “Dry Sack” isn’t really “Dry” at all. It’s a medium sweet blend of several types of sherries. Not too sweet, not too dry. Also, not terribly expensive.

This was a drink I really had to make before I could even imagine what it would taste like.  The Sherry Twist (No. 1) is odd, but not bad. Really more of a single serving, a la minute, Sherry and Brandy Punch than a cocktail.  It is kind of intriguing, semi-dry, and spicy.  Not sure if I would make it again, but I would certainly not turn it down if it was offered.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sherry and Egg Cocktail

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Sherry and Egg Cocktail.
Place an Egg in Large Port Wine Glass, being careful not to break the yolk. Fill glass with Sherry (Solear Manzanilla Sherry).

Yep, that’s an egg in sherry. Wait, is that like a sherried, er, shired, egg? Breakfast of Champions?

This cocktail actually goes all the way back to Jerry Thomas’ Bartender’s Guide.

All the same, hm, of these sorts of whole raw egg cocktails, I have to say this was probably the least enjoyable so far. I hate to say it, but it sort of made the Prairie Hen seem appealing.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sherry Cocktail

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Sherry Cocktail
4 dash Orange Bitters. (4 Dashes Bitter Truth Orange Bitters)
4 Dashes French Vermouth. (10ml Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)
1 Glass Sherry. (2 oz Solear Manzanilla Sherry)
Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.

The few cocktails with these small amounts of French Vermouth puzzle me. With modern dry vermouth, I just don’t understand the function of even my relatively generous reading of 4 dashes. Did French Vermouth used to have more flavor?

Likewise, that’s a lot of orange bitters. Offhand, I can’t think of many drinks that call for 4 dashes. It kind of distracted from the other ingredients of the drink.

Last, but not least, I only had the Solear Manzanilla in the house when making this cocktail. For me, these pale dry sherries are not particularly interesting in most cocktails. I enjoy them on their own with cheeses and appetizers, but for cocktails they fade like ghosts.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.