Stone Fence Cocktail

Stone Fence
1 Lump of Ice.
2 Dashes Angostura Bitters.
1 Glass Scotch Whisky. (2 oz Suntory Hibiki 12)
Use long tumbler and fill with soda water (Oliver’s Herefordshire Dry Perry).

Soda? Who makes a Stone Fence with Soda? Well, I’ll be damned if I am going to make a Stone Fence with Soda! Unfortunately, I had no traditional Cider in the house, either, so texted Daniel at Alembic to see if he had any. Turned out he only had this rather fancy still Pear Cider, but why not?

The day I was making this cocktail, Alembic was hosting an event with Suntory’s Whiskies. Well, when in Rome…

Great article over at Cask Strength regarding Suntory’s Whiskies:

Japanese Odyssey-Part One

Suntory’s whiskies are made in a very similar manner to Scotch, in fact, all the malt used in the whisky is imported from Scotland!

However the different casks used, Japanese Oak, and different weather conditions for aging give Suntory’s whiskies a very different character from Scotch Whisky.

Of the several Suntory Whiskies we had available, Daniel picked the Hibiki 12 for the cocktail. It is their youngest blended Whisky.

I really enjoyed this version of the Stone Fence, a drink I could drink. Very dry, mostly flavor coming from the cider, but with the Japanese Whisky poking through. Some who tried it thought it could use a little sweetener, but I’ve never seen a Stone Fence recipe call for sweetener, just Cider and Booze. I did miss the bubbles a tad.

I will have to re-try it with some of my favorite French Ciders, like those from Eric Bordelet or Etienne Dupont. Or for an extra funky beverage, Basque or Asturian Sidra…

And yes, this is a very old recipe. It was probably already a very old recipe when Jerry Thomas included it in his “Bartender’s Guide”.

Though the Thomas recipe is as follows:

Stone Fence.
(Use large bar-glass.)
Take 1 wine-glass of Bourbon or rye whiskey.
2 or 3 small lumps of ice.
Fill up the glass with sweet cider.

Grumble, I suppose “sweet cider” really means apple juice. But what fun is that?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Cameron’s Kick Cocktail

Cameron's Kick Cocktail

Cameron’s Kick Cocktail

1/3 Scotch Whisky (1 oz Compass Box Asyla Scotch Whisky)
1/3 Irish Whiskey (1 oz Red Breast Irish Whiskey)
1/6 Lemon Juice (1/2 oz fresh)
1/6 Orgeat Syrup (1/2 oz Monin Orgeat)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Squeeze orange peel on top.)

I can’t really think of a funnier or wittier way to put this than Paul Clarke did in his Cocktail Chronicle blog a year or so ago, so I’ll just include a quote:

Cameron’s Kick

Remember the old saw about how, if you took a million monkeys and gave them each a typewriter, they’d eventually come up with the works of Shakespeare? Well edit “typewriter” to read “cocktail shaker,” and stick the monkeys in a well-stocked bar, and the banana-addled mixologists would come up with a Cameron’s Kick in about the same amount of time it’d take that set of simian scribes to work their way around to Titus Andronicus.

Like “Blood in the Sand” it’s another of those cocktails that didn’t really seem anywhere near likely enough that it would be tasty to work it’s way up the list.

Yet here it is, and I quite enjoyed it.

Sweet and tart. Puzzling and a bit exotic. Some elements of spice, and some elements of Scotch Whiskey.

It really doesn’t seem like it should work. But, it does.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Alice, Mine Cocktail

Alice, Mine Cocktail

1/2 Italian Vermouth. (Generous 1 oz Italian Vermouth)
1/2 Russians Kummel. (Generous 1 oz Norwegian Aquavit, Dash Simple Syrup)
2 Dashes Scotch Whisky. (teaspoon Scotch Whisky)

Shake (Stir, please!) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Not having Kummel, a caraway liqueur, I cheated here and substituted Aquavit, a caraway flavored spirit.

It is all a bit confusing, in that there are about 3 cocktails with this same name and different ingredients. Sometimes the recipe is the exact same thing as the preceding Alfonso Special and sometimes it is just a Scotch Manhattan.

This version of the Alice, Mine Cocktail is actually surprisingly tasty.

There aren’t many Scotch cocktails, and it’s a shame this one isn’t known more.

The comma in the name of the cocktail puzzles me, otherwise I would say it might be named after the famous “Alice Mine” near Butte Montana and the part it played in the Silver rush of the 1870s.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Affinity Cocktail

Affinity Cocktail

1/3 French Vermouth. (1 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Cinzano Rosso Vermouth)
1/3 Scotch Whisky. (1 oz Compass Box Asyla)
2 Dashes Angostura Bitters.

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

Now, I haven’t really ever been much of a Scotch fan.

I know, I know, great world class whisky and all that. It’s some sort of personal failure on my part, I’m sure.

The Asyla, though, I quite enjoy.

Compass Box makes what is called “Vatted Scotch Whisky”. That is, Compass Box buys Scotch from other distillers, blends a bunch of them together with a particular flavor profile in mind, ages them, and then bottles them.

The Asyla is a pretty interesting Whisky. It is fairly mild, as Scotches go, with some nice briny notes. But, none of the extreme peat or smoke of the Islay type malts.

The Affinity Cocktail is basically a “Perfect” Scotch Manhattan. That is, Scotch Whisky with equal parts of Sweet and Dry Vermouth.

I was very tempted to reduce the Vermouths slightly; but, went out on a limb and let it stand as is.

Certainly glad I did!

As made, one of my favorite cocktails, so far, from the Savoy Cocktail Book.

The Vermouth and Bitters temper and accent the briny and savory notes of the whisky.

Yum!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.