Sazerac Cocktail (Old Potrero Ryes)

Sazerac Cocktail 27 out of 28.

I have challenged myself to post 28 Sazeracs in 28 days for the month of February.

I’ll try some different spirits, try some out at bars, and have some friends make them for me. Hopefully, if I can get my act together we’ll have some video.

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Sazerac Cocktail.
1 Lump of Sugar. (5ml Rich Simple Syrup)
1 Dash Angostura or Peychana Bitters. (a couple dashes Peychaud’s Bitters)
1 Glass Rye or Canadian Club Whisky. (2 oz Old Potrero Rye)

Stir well and strain into another glass that has been cooled and rinsed with Absinthe (Sirene Absinthe Verte). Squeeze lemon peel over glass and drop in (or discard).

I live in San Francisco and Anchor Distilling makes three Rye Whiskies. How could I not track them down and make Sazeracs with them?

‘If, as they say, God spanked the town
For being over frisky,
Why did He burn the churches down
And save Hotaling’s whiskey?’

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Actually, I already had the Hotaling’s  in the bar, so it wasn’t quite so awful on my pocket book as it might have been.

What can we glean about these different Whiskies from their labels?

Old Potrero 18th Century Century Style Spirit: Barrel Strength, 62.3% Alc/vol.  A pot-distilled spirit produced from 100% rye malt mash & aged 2 years 1 month in new uncharred oak barrels.

Old Potrero Single Malt Straight Rye Whiskey: 45% Alc/vol.  Pot distilled and aged in new charred oak barrels.

Old Potrero Single Malt Hotaling’s Whiskey:  50% Alc/vol.  Pot distilled and aged eleven years in American Oak barrels.

In case you didn’t know, the Anchor Brewery and distilling facility is located in the Potrero Hill neighborhood of San Francisco.  That’s where the name, “Old Potrero” comes from.

All three whiskies are “Single Malt” whiskies.  This means they are produced from a single type of grain, in this case Rye Malt Mash, and all the spirits in the bottle are manufactured at the same facility.

You will note that even though all three Anchor Whiskies are made from 100% Rye Malt Mash, only one of them is called, “Straight Rye Whiskey”.

The basic requirements for American Straight Rye Whiskey are:

1) they be made from at least 51% Rye Mash.

2) That they are not distilled to more than 160 Proof.

3) That they be aged in new charred American oak barrels.

4) The Whiskey must not be put into the barrels at more than 125 Proof.

5) That they be aged for at least 2 years.

Anchor falls astray of the “Straight Rye Whiskey” label due mostly to their barrel choices.

The 18th Century Style Spirit cannot be called “Straight Rye Whiskey” because it is aged in “new uncharred” oak barrels.  I also kind of wonder how they can have a 2 year old barrel proof spirit at 124.6 Proof, if it went into the barrels at 125.  I think the angel’s share loss of alcohol might be more than that.  But then, cough, Buffalo Trace’s George T. Stagg “Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey” is bottled at 142 Proof, so there is absolutely no way it could have been barreled at 125 proof!

The Hotaling’s Whiskey cannot be called “Straight Rye Whiskey” because it is aged in a mixture of used, charred, and uncharred barrels.

Anchor Sazerac #1: Old Potrero 18th Century Style Spirit (10-RW-ARM-3-1)

Damn, if there isn’t a familial resemblance here to the Genevieve Sazerac!  To be honest this was my favorite of the bunch.  There is tons of malt and grain character and a lot, lot of flavor.  If this is the sort of Rye Whiskey people were drinking the 18th and 19th Century, I guess I was born out of time.

Anchor Sazerac #2: Old Potrero Straight Rye Whiskey (10-SRW-ARM-G)

Lots more oak barrel flavor here, cherries and caramel, this tastes like you would expect a real straight rye Sazerac to taste.  OK, maybe a little burlier.  A similar Sazerac to the Hudson Rye Whiskey Sazerac.

Anchor Sazerac #3: Old Potrero Hotaling’s Whiskey (MCMVI-MMVI)

This was the 2006 bottling of the Hotaling’s Whiskey, released in commemoration of the 100th Anniversary of the Great San Francisco Quake and fire.  It was also the first batch of whiskey distilled at Anchor, and aged for 11 years before its release.  Anchor releases another barrel of this whiskey every year.  I am unclear if it is truly limited, or if they are supplementing by aging other later distilled Rye.  I remain ambivalent about the 2006 Hotaling’s.  I keep hoping it will grow on me, but it doesn’t.  It’s good, but for some reason almost reminds me more of Cognac than whiskey.  It is quite light in character, yet at the same time exhibits little malt flavor or body.  Not my favorite Sazerac.  For what it is worth, I have tried other year’s releases of the Hotaling’s and enjoyed them quite a bit more.  2008, I’m remembering, was a particularly tasty year.  Must have been a sweet barrel.

So yeah, if I were to pick a winner, a Sazerac that stood out here, it would have to be the 18th Century Style Spirit.  If you’ve been staring at that bottle, wondering why you bought it when it is definitely not a sipping Whiskey, give it a try in a Sazerac.  Think of it as stretching your money!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Fat Tuesday, 2010

Fat Tuesday at Chez Flannestad.

Soaking Beans

Beans and aromatics.

Cajun Triumvirate

Cajun Triumvirate.

Sangre de Toro

Rancho Gordo Sangre de Toro Beans.

Roux

Flour into hot oil.

Roux

About half way there.

Saute Veggies

Veggies into the cooked roux.

Cornbread

A nice skillet corn bread.

Fixins

Bar prepared.  How many drinks can you think of with these ingredients?

Choose Your Own Rye

Choose your own spirit for the Sazerac!

Gumbo

Chicken and Sausage Gumbo with Okra.

Beans & Greens

Beans with Collard Greens.

Anita MADE a fantastic King Cake.

I am slightly disturbed by this photo.  OK, I may not have been thorough in removing all the bouquet garni from the beans.

Guests included the lawyer, the ice cream maker, IT Manager/Musician, the artist/DJ, and the blogger/photographer/tech couple.  I dunno, sign of the times that just about everyone has a “slash” in their life’s work, but doesn’t quite have the same ring as, “Butcher, Baker, and Candlestick Maker.”

Our new acquaintance, the ice cream maker, and I have been working on Sazerac Ice Cream.  We’re up to Iteration 4 now, and while still a work in progress, this one was the best so far.  It is tough to get enough of the Whiskey flavor and still have the ice cream freeze.  We served the Sazerac Ice Cream with Anita’s King Cake.  Mrs. Flannestad got the Baby!  Guess that means she’s making the cake next time!

Sazerac Cocktail (Small Hand Foods Gum Syrup)

Sazerac Cocktail 24 out of 28.

I have challenged myself to post 28 Sazeracs in 28 days for the month of February.

I’ll try some different spirits, try some out at bars, and have some friends make them for me. Hopefully, if I can get my act together we’ll have some video.

Sazerac Cocktail.
1 Lump of Sugar. (Small Hand Foods Gum Syrup vs. 1-1 Organic Cane Sugar Syrup)
1 Dash Angostura or Peychana Bitters.
1 Glass Rye or Canadian Club Whisky. (Sazerac Straight Rye Whiskey)

Stir well and strain into another glass that has been cooled and rinsed with 1 dash Absinthe (Duplais Blanche) and squeeze lemon peel on top.

One of my goals was to blind taste a Sazerac made with Gum Syrup vs. one made with regular Simple Syrup.  I woulda also like to have had a rich simple syrup and a muddled sugar cube in the mix, but what are you gonna do?

So what better to do, than to stop by when my coworker Jennifer Colliau, the proprietress of Small Hand Foods, was working at Heaven’s Dog for a little Gomme Geekery. It is true, I have featured Jennifer before, but that was so long ago, does it really count?

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Gum Syrup, aka gomme, is made by including Gum Arabic along with the sugar in the solution used to sweeten drinks. Gum Arabic is produced on certain types of Acacia trees, mostly in Africa. It is essentially air dried tree sap and contains a lot of weird complex organic compounds like Polysaccharides and Glycoproteins. It is used in industrial food manufacture as a stabilizer and source of viscosity.

I’ve always floated the idea that Gum Syrup was originally used to imitate the viscosity of highly concentrated sugar syrups.  That at some point including X amount of Gum Arabic was cheaper than using X amount of Sugar. Sort of makes sense, especially when you consider that before granulated, refined sugar was available, how much work you had to go through to get sugar.  It had to be cut from a loaf or augered out of a barrel.  Then ground or dissolved and clarified.  A lot of work to get a clear-ish simple syrup.

Or Gum Syrup was solely used to increase the viscosity of sugar solutions and the drinks they were used to sweeten.

Gum Arabic is a pain in the ass to dissolve, and currently is far, far more expensive than sugar, so it seems like a lot of work to go through, just for a fairly subtle aesthetic change to the cocktails it is used in.

One interesting characteristic of Gum Arabic is that it blooms in high proof alcohol solutions, and turns the solution cloudy.  It can be a bit unattractive if you are making an old fashioned with Gum Syrup and Barrel Proof Whiskey. Sorta looks like Coffee or Tea with Milk.

An even cooler thing about it if you continue adding water to the solution, once it is below a certain point, the “bloom” disappears again.

Jennifer also mentioned that she had read that Gum Syrup was sometimes used to check the proof of spirits, though I am not exactly sure at what dilution level the bloom disappears.

That’s a Dash of Absinthe, 1/4 ounce of Gum, 1 oz of Thomas Handy Barrel Proof Rye, Chilled Water, and a couple dashes of Peychaud’s. Kind of a lazy person’s Sazerac, really, and quite tasty.  Ha! Now that I think about it, the above is the closest I’ve come to what Antoine Peychaud may have been serving at his Pharmacy: Bitters, Water, Sugar, and Spirits.  The original “Cocktail”.

Jennifer and I have talked often about what drinks we think are best when using Gum Syrup. To me, the delicate viscosity is often lost when using it in a shaken drink, so I prefer to use it in drinks like Old-Fashioneds and Sazeracs.

Other people really like it in shaken citrus drinks. Jennifer mentioned that Ryan at Beretta really loves to use it in traditional Daiquiris. We use her Pineapple Gum in our very popular Gin Fizz Tropical and Pisco Apricot Tropical drinks at Heaven’s Dog.

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She made the two drinks, had me turn around, and scrambled them up.

Could I tell the difference?

Well, I could tell they were different, and I made an educated guess which was which. Fortunately, I was right! Whew. The viscosity was a difficult thing to quantify.  As I tasted the Sazeracs, it seemed like the bigger difference was in the taste impact. The flavors in the Sazerac sweetened with Gum Syrup seemed to be married more happily together than those in the one sweetened simply with simple syrup.

If you’re curious about Small Hand Foods’ Syrups, they can be purchased in the San Francisco area at Plump Jack Wine Stores, K&L Wines, and Cask.  Outside of the Bay Area, I have it on good authority that Cocktail Kingdom will soon be carrying them.

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This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sazerac Cocktail (range)

Sazerac Cocktail 22 out of 28.

I have challenged myself to post 28 Sazeracs in 28 days for the month of February.

I’ll try some different spirits, try some out at bars, and have some friends make them for me. Hopefully, if I can get my act together we’ll have some video.

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Sazerac Cocktail.
1 Lump of Sugar.
1 Dash Angostura or Peychana Bitters.
1 Glass Rye or Canadian Club Whisky. (Sazerac 18 Rye Whiskey)

Stir well and strain into another glass that has been cooled, add l dash Absinthe and squeeze lemon peel on top.

It used to make me really nervous when I would have to serve other bartenders. Feeling like, you know, they were judging me, or I would fail horribly and let them down.

Then one Savoy Night at Alembic, Brooke Arthur hijacked the bar for her birthday party. Wall to wall bartenders. Strangely, no one made fun of me.

At that point, I kind of realized that bartenders are good to serve because they know what you are going through. They are usually sympathetic and supportive.

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Anyway, Brooke is an awesome bartender, who has been super supportive of my little adventures in bartending.  You can usually find her at the Mission District restaurant range. After Absinthe Bar and Brasserie opened, there was a bit of a delay before other restaurants began to realize the value of spending some effort on a cocktail program. Range was among the second wave of restaurants to learn from Absinthe’s example and put some “ooomph” into their cocktail program. Also, the food is very tasty.

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Stopping by range for a Sazerac, Brooke chose to make it with the Sazerac 18 Rye Whiskey (2006, I believe). Like Brian at Jardiniere, she went through the whole old fashioned sugar muddling procedure. It’s interesting, I guess what I find with the muddled sugar Sazeracs, is that really very little of the sugar dissolves, making them very lightly sweetened versions of the drink. This actually works quite well when you want to feature a high end Whiskey, like the Sazerac 18.

Anyway, here’s a good Black and White Photo of Brooke. Wish I’d taken it, but sadly, I did not.  When I asked what classic or original cocktail she is currently obsessing over, she said The Brooklyn, which is usually made as follows:

Brooklyn Cocktail

1 Dash Amer Picon (1/2 barspoon Torani Amer)
1 Dash Maraschino (1/2 barspoon Luxardo Maraschino)
2/3 Canadian Club Whisky (1 1/2 oz Rye Whiskey)
1/3 French Vermouth (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I have to admit, I find the Brooklyn a bit odd. I can’t think of many other Dry, Aromatic Cocktails made with Brown Spirits. It seems profoundly out of sync with the usual tendency towards sweet, rich, aromatic brown drinks, but in a good way.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sazerac Cocktail (Van Winkle Family Reserve Rye)

Sazerac Cocktail 20 out of 28.

I have challenged myself to post 28 Sazeracs in 28 days for the month of February.

I’ll try some different spirits, try some out at bars, and have some friends make them for me. Hopefully, if I can get my act together we’ll have some video.

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Sazerac Cocktail.
1 Lump of Sugar. (10ml Rich Simple Syrup)
1 Dash Angostura or Peychana Bitters. (a couple dashes Peychaud’s Bitters)
1 Glass Rye or Canadian Club Whisky. (2 oz Van Winkle Family Reserve Rye, H1889)

Stir well and strain into another glass that has been cooled and rinsed with Absinthe (Sirene Absinthe Verte) and squeeze lemon peel on top.

Found this rye whiskey at Star Liquor in Madison, Wisconsin a few years ago.  About 15 years ago, when Mrs. Flannestad and I lived in Madison, Star Liquor was our neighborhood store.  I lived near it for a good 8 years and probably was in at least once a week from 1985 through 1993.  They were always helpful, especially during my periods of enthusiasm for this or that wine or beer.

Funnily, the last time we were in, we were vacationing in Wisconsin.  We hadn’t probably been in to the store for a good 10 years.  When they saw us, they recognized us immediately and asked us how things were going, as if we’d never left.  We had to kind of explain slowly that we’d moved to California about 10 years before, believe it or not.  We went on to buy a bunch of beer and spirits.

Since then, the Van Winkle Family Reserve Rye has been sitting in the basement waiting for an occasion special enough to open it.

This is a big, sweet burly Rye, with a long, dry finish.  My guess is, if you were given it in a blind tasting with a mixed bunch of Bourbons and Ryes, you would put it in the group with the Bourbons.  Thus it doesn’t make a super fantastic Sazerac, at least in my mind.  In fact, mixing it with anything other than a touch of water is a bit of a waste of this great American Whiskey.  While I like mixing with them, there are very few Ryes I really consider sipping whiskeys, but this is definitely one of them.  If you see a bottle, do not hesitate to purchase.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sazerac Cocktail (High West Rendezvous Rye)

Sazerac Cocktail 19 out of 28.

I have challenged myself to post 28 Sazeracs in 28 days for the month of February.

I’ll try some different spirits, try some out at bars, and have some friends make them for me. Hopefully, if I can get my act together we’ll have some video.

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Sazerac Cocktail.
1 Lump of Sugar. (10ml Rich Simple Syrup)
1 Dash Angostura or Peychana Bitters. (a couple dashes Peychaud’s Bitters)
1 Glass Rye or Canadian Club Whisky. (2 oz High West Rendezvous Rye)

Stir well and strain into another glass that has been cooled and rinsed with Absinthe (Greenway Distiller’s Absinthe Superior) and squeeze lemon peel on top.

Reading curmudgeonly posts recently from Chuck Cowdery (Potemkin Craft Distilleries), I discovered there is a bit of controversy regarding High West Rendezvous Rye.  Some take issue with the fact that High West sort of implies that they make their Ryes, when in fact they simply buy already distilled Ryes and blend them.  OK, they use the word “craft” on their website, as in, “small batch mountain crafted spirits”.  You have to dig a bit deeper to discover, “While High West’s own Rocky Mountain Whiskies age, we are fortunate to offer some beautiful and very unique whiskies we found that no one else was willing to sell.”  Cowdery questions whether they are ever planning on releasing their own Whiskies, as really they could have released a 4 year old rye by now.

Does it matter all that much?

A number of independent bottlers of Scotch solely buy and blend spirits, why should American whiskey manufacturers not be allowed to do the same, as long as the whiskies are tasty and they don’t mis-represent themselves?

And the Rendezvous Rye is quite tasty.  An interesting blend they claim is made up of two whiskies: a 6 year old made from 95% rye and a 16 year old made from 80% rye.  It reminds me most of the Michter’s US*1 Straight Rye, clean and relatively lightly flavored.

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As always, sharing Sazeracs is more fun than drinking them by yourself!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sazerac Cocktail (Michter’s Straight Rye)

Sazerac Cocktail 17 out of 28.

I have challenged myself to post 28 Sazeracs in 28 days for the month of February.

I’ll try some different spirits, try some out at bars, and have some friends make them for me. Hopefully, if I can get my act together we’ll have some video.

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Sazerac Cocktail.
1 Lump of Sugar. (10ml Rich Simple Syrup)
1 Dash Angostura or Peychana Bitters. (a couple dashes Peychaud’s Bitters)
1 Glass Rye or Canadian Club Whisky. (2 oz Michter’s Straight Rye)

Stir well and strain into another glass that has been cooled and rinsed with Absinthe (Sirene Absinthe Verte) and squeeze lemon peel on top.

Michter’s is an historic American Whiskey Brand. Something like it was originally produced in Pennsylvania, though the history is quite tangled.  Suffice it to say that most of the current whiskey sold as “Michter’s” has very little to do with whatever whiskey was made in 1753.  However, fortunately, Michter’s US*1 Single Barrel Rye is a very nice rye.  It treads a nice path between the lack of impact of some of the lower priced ryes and those big boys who strain your pocket book.

Makes a fine Sazerac, as well.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sazerac Cocktail (Beretta)

Sazerac Cocktail 15 out of 28.

I have challenged myself to post 28 Sazeracs in 28 days for the month of February.

I’ll try some different spirits, try some out at bars, and have some friends make them for me. Hopefully, if I can get my act together we’ll have some video.

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Mrs. Flannestad and a friend wanted to meet for dinner at Front Porch. Casting about for nearby sources of Sazeracs, Beretta occurred to me. Wow, could it really be nearly 2 years since I visited with Mr. Thad Vogler in this restaurant?

Dropping by, I was pleased to discover Mr. Ryan Fitzgerald behind the bar.

I should really have a picture of him here, but I failed to get a decent image of him while photographing at Beretta.  Ambient light photography can be a bitch.  Just google “I hate cocktails” and I’m sure you’ll find something.

But while Ryan and I were emailing back and forth, trying to schedule another photo shoot, my wife noticed that his email address meant something, “I didn’t know that Ryan was in a band.” I had no idea either until she explained that his email address related to the band “Broker Dealer” on the well respected Ghostly label.

Reminds me of one of the things I really like about working in restaurants.  Almost every one has some interesting hobby or other interest.  Talking to bartenders and waiters, you often discover amazing things they are doing other than working in bars or restaurants.  Whether it’s wood working, film making, political activism, raising a family, or running a small business, it seems many are over achievers with a keen interest in living life to the fullest.  They aren’t people who can easily be defined using a single category.  I often feel like the most boring guy at the party, as all I do is work a computer job, bartend, and write this blog.  Well, those and training a dog are keeping me pretty busy at the moment, so what can you do?

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Sazerac Cocktail.
1 Lump of Sugar. (Small Hand Foods Gum Syrup)
1 Dash Angostura or Peychana Bitters.
1 Glass Rye or Canadian Club Whisky. (Wild Turkey Rye Whiskey)

Stir well and strain into another glass that has been cooled, add l dash Absinthe and squeeze lemon peel on top.

Another perfectly executed and delicious Sazerac. Mr. Fitzgerald’s use of Gum Syrup is interesting. A lot of bartenders say it adds a lot to a cocktail like a Sazerac, mostly in texture. I really want to do a blind tasting of a few different sweeteners before I finish this. Gum Syrup, 2x Simple, 1x Simple, and cube sugar. I am curious what the perceivable differences will be.

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This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sazerac Cocktail (Rickhouse)

Sazerac Cocktail 14 out of 28.

I have challenged myself to post 28 Sazeracs in 28 days for the month of February.

I’ll try some different spirits, try some out at bars, and have some friends make them for me. Hopefully, if I can get my act together we’ll have some video.

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Sazerac Cocktail.
1 Lump of Sugar.
1 Dash Angostura or Peychana Bitters.
1 Glass Rye or Canadian Club Whisky. (Wild Turkey Rye Whiskey)

Stir well and strain into another glass that has been cooled, add l dash Absinthe and squeeze lemon peel on top.

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Visiting Rickhouse for an event, I took the opportunity to ask for a Sazerac.

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Kelli was kind enough to stir one up with Wild Turkey Rye.

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Delicious!  Nothing weird or unusual going on here, just a perfectly executed Sazerac.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sazerac Cocktail (Jardiniere)

Sazerac Cocktail 13 out of 28.

I have challenged myself to post 28 Sazeracs in 28 days for the month of February.

I’ll try some different spirits, try some out at bars, and have some friends make them for me. Hopefully, if I can get my act together we’ll have some video.

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Sazerac Cocktail.
1 Lump of Sugar.
1 Dash Angostura or Peychana Bitters.
1 Glass Rye or Canadian Club Whisky. (Copper Fox Rye Whiskey)

Stir well and strain into another glass that has been cooled, add l dash Absinthe and squeeze lemon peel on top.

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Well, I did mention I would try to get some friends involved.

I first met Brian Mac Gregor just this year, oddly. We were both participating in the B.A.R. Live training and testing seminar at a hotel. After meeting, I sent him a “friend request” on facebook and he graciously accepted. While perusing his profile, I noticed that he was a fellow ex-Wisconsinite, and excitedly sent him a message.  Turned out he remembered traveling through my home town as a kid en route to the Cave of the Mounds.  Hilarious!

Brian’s Bio blur: tending bar for over five years, born and raised in milwaukee, father was a bartender for over 25 years, mother is a teacher.  Currently the bar manager at Jardiniere.  Lives with his girlfriend and our greyhound Pooka.

When I started thinking about the Sazerac Project, I really wanted to get some other bartenders to make them.  It’s interesting to see how the different styles of mixing create a similar, yet completely different drink.  I sent a note to Brian, asking if he had any interesting ryes.  He mentioned the Copper Fox Rye, so I dropped by for a Sazerac one night Mrs. Flannestad and I were in the neighborhood of the bar he manages, Jardiniere.

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Brian went old school, doing the whole muddling of the sugar cube and everything. The Sazerac ended up on the lean and boozy side, a good thing when you’re featuring a whiskey with as much character as the Copper Fox Rye. This is a really interesting whiskey, almost Scotch-like in its complexity and nuance. I really enjoyed it both on its own and in the Sazerac.

Brian also sent along this original cocktail he created for San Francisco Cocktail week a couple years ago.  Slivovitz and St. Germain in the same cocktail?  If trying that unlikely combination isn’t enough of a reason to stop by the bar at Jardiniere, I don’t know what is.

Tippler’s Delight

1.5 oz Navip Slivovitz
.75 oz St Germain
.75 oz Lemon
dashes of Vieux Pontarlier Absinhte
shake and strain

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This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.