Clayton’s Cocktail

Clayton's Cocktail

Clayton’s Special Cocktail

1/2 Bacardi Rum (2 oz Flor de Cana Extra Dry Rum)
1/4 Kola Tonic (1/2 oz Rose’s Kola Tonic)
1/4 Sirop-de-Citron (1/2 oz Monin Lemon Syrup)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Note: I did slightly increase the ratio of booze to syrup in the recipe.

My big regret is I bought Lemon Syrup instead of making it myself.

The Monin is OK. At least it doesn’t have corn syrup. However, I didn’t realize until I looked at the bottle when I got home, that it does have preservatives, natural flavors, and FD&C Yellow #5.

I know this cocktail would have been at least 200% better with home made lemon syrup. Well, the next time sirop-de-Citron comes up, it’s going to be home made.

The Kola tonic seems to be a fairly subtle flavor to me. I kind of get it as an aftertaste. Nothing really strong. It seems like a dash or two of Fee’s Aromatic Bitters or Lemon Bitters would really punch this cocktail up.

Anyway, quite tasty. Could be a little more tart for my tastes, I suppose.

As an aside, I was sort of wondering who the Clayton in Clayton’s Special Cocktail was.

After a bit of googling, I discovered the following:

According to the wikipedia, Clayton’s was “originally blended and bottled by the Clayton Brothers for the Pure Water Company, Battersea, London, in the 1880s”…and is the brand name of a non-alcoholic, non-carbonated beverage coloured and packaged to resemble bottled whisky. It was the subject of a major marketing campaign in Australia and New Zealand in the 1970’s & 1980s, promoting it as “the drink you have when you’re not having a drink” at a time when alcohol was being targeted as a major factor in the road toll.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Chinese Cocktail

Chinese Cocktail

Chinese Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters
3 Dashes Maraschino (1/2 bar spoon Luxardo Maraschino)
3 Dashes Curacao (1/2 bar spoon Senior Curacao of Curacao)
1/3 Grenadine (1, well 3/4, oz Home Made Grenadine)
2/3 Jamaica Rum (2 oz Appleton Estate V/X Rum)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

No idea why this is called the “Chinese Cocktail”. From the ingredients, it seems like the recipe must be old. Say, pre-1900. I know there was a “Japanese” cocktail in one of the versions of Jerry Thomas’ cocktail book.

The flavors combination is actually very good; but, the cocktail is rather too sweet, even with home made grenadine. I think changing it to 3/4 rum, 1/4 grenadine, and being a bit more generous with the bitters, would be closer to my taste.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Underhill Punsch–Tales Version

Underhill Punsch

Underhill Punsch–Tales Version

2 750ml Bottles of El Dorado 5 Year Demarara Rum
1 750ml Bottle Batavia Arrack van Oosten.
8 lemons, sliced thin and seeded.
750ml Water.
8 teaspoons Yunnan Fancy China Black Tea.
2 crushed cardamom pods.
4 cups Washed Raw Sugar.

This makes a bit more than 3 litres.

Put sliced lemon in a resealable non-reactive container(s). Pour Rum and Batavia Arrack over lemons. Cover and steep for 6 hours.

Heat water and steep tea and cardamom in it for the usual 6 minutes. Pour through cheesecloth to remove tea leaves and cardamom pods.

Dissolve sugar in hot tea and cool to room temperature. Refrigerate.

After 6 hours, pour rum off of sliced citrus, without squeezing fruit.

Combine tea syrup and flavored rum. Filter and bottle in a clean sealable container(s). Age at least overnight and enjoy where Swedish Punch is called for.

A more traditional version of Swedish Punsch than the previous Underhill Punsch II.

(By the way, that El Dorado 5 is a really tasty rum for the price!)

We’ll be serving this during the Tales of the Cocktail panel I’ve somehow snuck on with the following esteemed gentlemen: Jamie Bourdreau(!), Paul Clarke(!), and John Deragon(!). Huh, that is odd, B, C, D, and E? Were they just going alphabetically? I’m not entirely sure what exact cocktails the other gentleman are making, but I’ve heard rumors of a new version of Jamie’s Amer Picon replica, some whispering from John about Bacon Fat Washed Bourbon, and Paul seems to be infusing enough Tequila por Mi Amante to make nearly the whole remaining population of New Orleans a drink.

Hope to see you there!

Making Your Own Cocktail Ingredients

Forbidden Island Field Trip

One of the drinks included in “Food & Wine Cocktails 2008″ is Martin Cate’s version of the classic Trader Vic drink the Fog Cutter

Forbidden Island

Taking the opportunity of a friend’s band (The awesome Project Pimento!) playing at Forbidden Island, I stopped by to try the drink in question.

Fog Cutter

Le Fog Cutter. Tasty! I’d not tried one before. It was fruitier than I expected, with a good amount of the drink’s character coming from the Orgeat. I don’t have the book handy, but it has always struck me as an unlikely combination of ingredients, especially for a Tiki Drink. Most recipes include: Brandy, Gin, Rum, Sherry, Orgeat Syrup, and Orange Juice. Sometimes lemon. Somehow it all works!

Martin & I*

I am such a bartender stalker! Anyway, Martin went on to explain how interesting it is to track the sweetness and different character of the Fog Cutter through the seasons. They’re on late season Navel oranges right now, giving the drink a sweeter character. He said pretty soon they’d be switching to Valencias, which would be quite tart in the early part of the season and then mellow as the summer went on.

FGCUTTR*

Martin even brought in his old FGCUTTR license plate for photographic documentation.

*Humuhumu took these pictures.

Canadian Cocktail

Canadian Cocktail

Canadian Cocktail

The Juice of 1/4 Lemon
1/4 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar (no thanks, sweet enough already)
1 Liqueur Glass Curacao (about 1 1/4 oz Senior Curacao of Curacao)
3 Dashes Jamaica Rum (1/4 oz Inner Circle Green)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

The big question here was what rum to use.

I knew it had to be something with enough oomph that it would be noticed in a very small amount. I’ve also read that Canadians and Newfundlanders allegedly enjoy that “Screech” sort of thing. I singed my nose hairs on a few of the usual suspects. Pusser’s, Lemon Hart 151, and the Inner Circle Green. Kind of wish I had some Wray and Nephew white in the house. But, anyway, ended up with the Inner Circle Green. It seemed to have the most interesting funk of the bunch.

Cocktail is alright. Making as I did, it’s really pretty close in sweetness to many of the cocktails served in the mainstream American bars. If I were to make it again, it would be more to my taste as: 1/2 oz Curacao, 3/4 oz Cuban style rum, 1/4 oz overproof rum, juice 1/4 lemon.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Goombay Smash

When I was thinking about a Mixology Monday drink a while ago, it reminded me of my parents, and specifically my Dad. My parents took their honeymoon in the Bahamas. It was there that my Father discovered both the wonder and pain of strong drink. I don’t know the details; but, for him, whatever cocktail he had there confirmed what he had been taught. That what was too tasty and too fun, was also bad. While, later in life he would occasionally have a glass of wine with dinner, to my knowledge, he didn’t drink hard liquor again in his life.

A quick read through Jeff Berry’s Intoxica and Grog Log, revealed only a glancing reference to the “Queen’s Park Swizzle” as a drink which might have been served in the Carribean in the 50s. Worried that I might have to make a Bahama Mama, I asked a couple people what cocktails might have been likely served during that era in the Bahamas. Martin Cate of Forbidden Island suggested the “Goombay Smash” and Ted Haigh agreed the Goombay Smash or a Planter’s Punch might be a good choice. Both Mr. Cate and the Doctor dismissed the Queen’s Park Swizzle as far too strongly tasting of liquor, to appeal to young midwestern tourists.

The Goombay Smash is a specialty of Miss Emily’s Blue Bee Bar in the Bahamas. While the exact formulation of the Goombay Smash remains a secret of that establishment, Mr. Cate suggested the following from the UK sauceguide publication.

Goombay Smash

Goombay Smash

1.5 oz Pusser’s Navy Rum
.75 oz coconut rum (Cruzan)
3 oz pineapple juice
.25 oz fresh lime juice
.25 oz Cointreau
.25 oz simple syrup
(dash drinkboy house bitters)

Shake and pour over (crushed) rocks.

Fine and tasty it is. My only embellishment was to add a generous dash of homemade drinkboy house bitters, whose ginger-spice kick I thought would nicely complement the tropical flavors. For an extra touch of exotica, I garnished it with a couple sprigs of lemon balm and a cup and saucer vine flower.

While I don’t know if the Goombay is truly that “exotic”, it certainly is quaffable. Just the sort of thing that goes down easy during the afternoon on a hot Carribean island. And the Pusser’s certainly packs enough of a punch to make you regret having one too many.

Dad

Dad, this one’s for you.

B.V.D. Cocktail

B.V.D. Cocktail

1/3 Bacardi Rum (3/4 oz Flor de Cana Extra Dry)
1/3 Dry Gin (3/4 oz Boodles Gin)
1/3 French Vermouth (3/4 oz Noilly Prat)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Interesting dry Martini variation. The rum disappears into the vermouth and gin. Had a hard time even detecting it in the cocktail.

Lemon Twist or olive wouldn’t be inappropriate, depending on your predilection. Heck, maybe even some bitters.

Does “B.V.D.” stand for “Bradley, Voorhees & Day”, as in, underwear?

Or is it Bacardi, Vermouth, and Dry Gin?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Bush Ranger Cocktail

Bush-Ranger Cocktail

2 Dashes Angostura Bitters
1/2 Caperitif (1 1/2 oz Lillet Blanc)
1/2 Bacardi Rum (1 1/2 oz Santa Teresa Gran Reserva)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. (Garnish with orange zest.)

Usually, Lillet and Orange are flavors I enjoy, however, with the rum here, my embellishment doesn’t quite work. Also, as usual, I have no idea how close a substitution Lillet blanc is for the defunct South African aperitif wine, Caperitif.

I like the more expensive Santa Teresa 1796 rum; but, remain kind of unimpressed by the Gran Reserva. It’s just not got a lot of character. Also, I think my Lillet is getting old and needs to be replaced. When the cocktail warmed up, I definitely detected a little “refrigerator” taste. I will probably re-try this cocktail at a later date with a different rum and some new aperitif wine.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Underhill Punsch II

In the quest to make a Swedish Punch Clone, I had combined two Jerry Thomas recipes and made a variation using Sri Lankan Arrack. While interesting, I later discovered it wasn’t very Similar to Swedish Punch.

I re-used the same procedure recently using Batavia Arrack.

This was what I did:

Underhill Punsch II

1 cup Appleton V/X Rum
1/2 cup Batavia Arrack
1 cup hot extra strong tea (2 tsp Peet’s Lung Ching Dragonwell tea brewed in 1 cup water)
1 cup sugar
1 lemon sliced thinly, seeds removed
1 lime sliced thinly, seeds removed

Put sliced lemon and lime in a resealable non-reactive container large enough to hold 4 cups of liquid. Pour Rum and Batavia Arrack over citrus. Cover and steep for 6 hours.

Dissolve sugar in hot tea and cool to room temperature. Refrigerate.

After 6 hours, pour rum off of sliced citrus, without squeezing fruit.

Combine tea syrup and flavored rum. Filter and bottle in a clean sealable container. Age at least overnight and enjoy where Swedish Punch is called for.

The interaction between the Chinese green tea and the lime gives this an interesting flavor. One person who tried it compared it to the bitter greens they’d just had in their salad. Just on its own, at room temperature, this is a little much, as the intense bitter lime aftertaste tends to linger on the palate. Over ice, though, it is quite a pleasant beverage. I’m going to be interested to see how this variation mixes.

Bolo Cocktail

Bolo Cocktail

The Juice of 1/4 Lemon or 1/2 Lime (1/2 Lime)
The Juice of 1/4 Orange (Valencia)
1/2 Wineglass Bacardi Rum (1 generous oz of Flor de Cana Extra Dry)
1 Teaspoonful Sugar (1 scant teaspoon caster sugar)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Lime Wheel.)

Quite delicious! Kind of a “lite” Daiquiri. Certainly quite refreshing and tart.

One nifty trick I learned from Angus Winchester’s Daiquiri Video is to drop the juiced lime shell into the cocktail shaker. Also seemed appropriate for the Bolo. Give it a try, if you think that extra lime oil scent would add something to a cocktail you’re making.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.