Fox Trot Cocktail

Fox Trot Cocktail

The Juice of 1/2 Lemon or 1 Lime. (Juice 1/2 lemon)
2 Dashes Orange Curacao. (1/2 teaspoon Luxardo Triplum)
Bacardi Rum. (1 1/2 oz Flor de Cana Extra Dry)
(1/2 oz Inner Circle Green Rum)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

The “character rum” which I had previously been deploying in cocktails calling for Bacardi rum was a flop here. I added too much of it for such a lightly sweetened and flavored cocktail. Just use the Flor de Cana, or keep it down to a dash.

Another proto-Margarita?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Four Flush Cocktail

Four Flush Cocktail

1 Dash Grenadine or Syrup. (homemade)
1/4 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/4 Swedish Punch. (1/2 oz Carlshamm’s Flaggpunsch)
1/2 Bacardi Rum. (1 oz Flor de Cana Rum)
(1/4 oz Inner Circle Green Rum)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Drop in a cherry garnish.)

Again unable to resist the urge to add a touch of “character rum” to a cocktail calling for Bacardi.

Quite sweet, but not unpleasant. I’m always surprised by how dominant the Swedish Punsch is in the cocktails which contain it.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Fluffy Ruffles Cocktail

Fluffy Ruffles Cocktail

1/2 Bacardi Rum. (1 oz Flor de Cana Extra Dry, 1/4 oz Inner Circle Green)
1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Martini and Rossi Rosso)
The Peel of 1 Lime or Piece of Lemon. (Peel from a lime)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (For extra fun, I added the peel to the drink for the picture. It looked neat, but made it difficult to drink.)

OK, I couldn’t resist slipping a little “character rum” in to zip up the flavor of the Flor de Cana in this cocktail. If Havana Club is any indication of the flavor vintage Bacardi Rum had, it probably had a little more funk than the very clean Flor de Cana.

The Fluffy Ruffles is a pleasant, lime tinged, rum Manhattan. I dare you to order it out at a bar!

A quick google tells me “Fluffy Ruffles” was a musical comedy by Hattie Williams which made its theatrical debut at New York’s Criterion Theatre in the fall of 1908. Many of the songs in this production were co-written by Jerome Kern. Also, I find sheet music from earlier dates than that, so it appears it was first a ragtime song, or perhaps just that it was a popular name for songs, well, being that it refers to the fluffy ruffles of women’s petticoats.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Fair and Warmer Cocktail

Fair and Warmer Cocktail

1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Martini and Rossi Rosso Vermouth)
2/3 Bacardi Rum. (1 1/2 oz Havana Club 7)
2 Dashes Curacao. (1/2 teaspoon Luxardo Triplum)

Shake (stir) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I was going to use the regular Flor de Cana dry, but it seemed like all I would taste would be the vermouth. Glad to have an excuse to use the Havana Club, instead.

I’ve been using the M&R sweet vermouth for a couple months now, and I gotta say, it’s kind of won me over. The Cinzano just tastes really cloying now, with vanilla notes that distract me from the flavor of the drink.

The Luxardo Triplum isn’t a Curacao, strictly speaking, whatever that means, but it does pack the strongest bitter orange punch of the various orange liqueurs I currently have in the house.

Seemed like a drink that called out for a cherry, but these Silver Palate Maraschino Cherries (no artificial color) just suck. Might as well eat sugar coated red cardboard. I’m going to have to track down some more of those tasty Toschi Amarena Cherries. They rocked.

New supposed crystal glassware from ebay. A little top heavy and I find the stems a bit short, but I’m pleased to find them the perfect size for the neat drinks in the Savoy.

What’s not to love about a “Cuban Manhattan”?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Eye Opener Cocktail

Eye-Opener Cocktail

The Yolk of 1 Fresh Egg.
1 Teaspoonful Powdered Sugar. (scant teaspoon Caster Sugar)
2 Dashes Absinthe. (1/2 tsp Verte de Fougerolles)
2 Dashes Curacao. (1/2 tsp Brizard Orange Curacao)
2 Dashes Crème de Noyau. (1/2 tsp Amaretto di Saschira)
1 Liqueur Glass Rum. (1 1/2 oz Inner Circle Green Rum)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Sadly, my schemes to acquire Noyau de Poissy or Noyau de Vernon have so far come to naught, so I have substituted Luxardo’s Amaretto.

Unlikely though it seems, this is a very nice cocktail, and will certainly open your eyes, should they previously have been closed.

Both this and the preceding “Everything But” would make tremendous brunch cocktails. If we find enough of these, maybe we can finally put those old saws, the mimosa and screwdriver, back to bed where they belong.

By the way, If you’re like me, you’ll make this cocktail, taste it, and think of that open bottle of champagne in your fridge. Go for it. It’s even tastier that way.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Dunlop Cocktail

Edit: Retranslated in honor of International Talk Like a Pirate Day.

Dunlop Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1/3 Sherry. (3/4 oz Don Nuno Dry Oloroso Sherry)
2/3 Rum. (1 1/2 oz Diplomatico Rum)

Stir well an’ strain into cocktail glass. (Squeeze lemon peel o’er glass)

Pretty wide open drink here on th’ ingredient fore. At least ‘t specifies which type o’ bitters!

I started by pickin’ th’ sherry, an’ then headed down t’ th’ garage t’ investigate th’ smells o’ th’ various rums I be havin’ stored down thar. I be thinkin’ dark an’ dry in combination wi’ th’ Sherry, an’ th’ Diplomatico stuck ou’ as an interestin’ combination.

Ended up quite tasty, but really needed th’ added aromatic zip o’ th’ peel t’ brin’ th’ drink t’ life.

This post be one in a series documentin’ me ongoin’ effort t’ make all o’ th’ cocktails in th’ Savoy Cocktail Book, startin’ at th’ first, Abbey, an’ endin’ at th’ last, Zed.

Davis Cocktail

Davis Cocktail

Davis Cocktail
1/4 Jamaica Rum. (generous 1/2 oz Inner Circle Green)
1/2 French Vermouth. (generous 1 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
2 Dashes Grenadine. (1 tsp. homemade)
Juice of 1/2 Lemon or 1 Lime. (1 lime)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

This is a confusing one, not least because the ingredient fractions fail to add up to the usual “one”.

My version of Duffy gives it as:

Davis
1/2 Jamaica Rum.
1/2 French Vermouth.
2 Dashes Raspberry Syrup.
Juice of 1 Lime.
Shake well with ice and strain into glass.

And the Cocktaildb, Jones’ Complete Barguide one assumes, gives it as:

Davis Cocktail
3/4 oz fresh lime juice (2 cl, 3/16 gills)
1 1/2 oz Jamaica rum (4.5 cl, 3/8 gills)
1/2 oz raspberry syrup (or grenadine) (1.5 cl, 1/8 gills)
3/4 oz dry vermouth (2 cl, 3/16 gills)

I tried the cocktaildb version on Saturday night using Appleton V/X and my wife said it tasted like candy. Pretty disgusting. Way too much grenadine.

Went back to the original, and decided the sensible thing would be an overproof and rather flavorful rum. Not bad at all. With the Inner Circle overproof rum and a reasonable amount of sweetener, it really is all about the rum and the lime. A refreshing tonic.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Daiquiri Cocktail

I’ve actually talked already about the Daiquiri in the post “Daiquiris, a Cautionary Tale,” but for that post, (back when I wasn’t too lazy to make movies,) I didn’t actually make a regular Daiquiri. So here we go!

Daiquiri

Daiquiri Cocktail

The Juice of 1/4 Lemon or 1/2 Lime. (1/2 Lime)
1 Teaspoonful Powdered Sugar. (1 teaspoon caster sugar)
1 Glass Bacardi Rum. (2 oz Flor de Cana Extra-Dry)

(Drop the lime shell into the cocktail shaker.) Shake well and (double) strain into cocktail glass.

“The Moment had arrived for a Daiquiri. It was a delicate compound ; it elevated my contentment to an even higher pitch. Unquestionably the cocktail on my table was a dangerous agent, for it held in its shallow glass bowl slightly encrusted with undissolved sugar the power of a contemptuous indifference to fate; it set the mind free of responsibility; obliterating both memory and to- morrow, it gave the heart an adventitious feeling of superiority and momentarily vanquished all the celebrated, the eternal fears. Yes, that was the danger of skilfully prepared intoxicating drinks . The word ‘Intoxicating’ adequately expressed their power. Their menace to orderly, monotonous resignation. A word, I thought further, debased by moralists from its primary ecstatic content…but then, with a fresh Daiquiri and a sprig of orange blossom in my button-hole, it meant less than nothing”

A short extract from Joseph Hergesheimer’s “San Cristobal de la Habana” which contains much wisdom concerning Drinks, Cigars and the Art of Fine Living.

This was always one of my favorite quotes from the Savoy. Fortunately, I was able to track down the Full Text of Hergesheimer’s “San Cristobal de la Habana” on the Internet archive. The Savoy editors chose to edit the passage in some pretty interesting, and fairly predictable, ways. I’ve added the deleted text back in, in bold.

“The moment, now, had arrived for a Daiquiri: seated near the cool drip of the fountain, where a slight stir of air seemed to ruffle the fringed mantone of a bronze dancing Andalusian girl, I lingered over the frigid mixture of Ron Bacardi, sugar, and a fresh vivid green lime.

“It was a delicate compound, not so good as I was to discover later at the Telegrafo, but still a revelation, and I was devoutly thankful to be sitting, at that hour in the Inglaterra, with such a drink. It elevated my contentment to an even higher pitch ; and, with a detached amusement, I recalled the fact that farther north prohibition was formally in effect. Unquestionably the cocktail on my table was a dangerous agent, for it held, in its shallow glass bowl slightly encrusted with undissolved sugar, the power of a contemptuous indifference to fate; it set the mind free of responsibility; obliterating both memory and tomorrow, it gave the heart an adventitious feeling of superiority and momentarily vanquished all the celebrated, the eternal, fears.

“Yes, that was the danger of skilfully prepared, intoxicating drinks. . . . The word intoxicating adequately expressed their power, their menace to orderly monotonous resignation. A word, I thought further, debased by moralists from its primary ecstatic content. Intoxication with Ron Bacardi, with May, with passion, was a state threatening to privilege, abhorrent to authority. And, since the dull were so fatally in the majority, they had succeeded in attaching a heavy penalty to whatever lay outside their lymphatic understanding. They had, as well, made the term gay an accusation before their Lord, confounding it with loose, so that now a gay girl certainly the only girl worth a ribbon or the last devotion was one bearing upon her graceful figure, for she was apt to be reprehensibly graceful, the censure of a society open to any charge other than that of gaiety in either of its meanings. A ridiculous, a tragic, conclusion, I told myself indifferently: but then, with a fresh Daiquiri and a sprig of orange blossoms in my buttonhole, it meant less than nothing.”

More interesting that, and an interesting book on the whole.

It’s kind of funny, I’ve made versions of the Hemingway Special, (with Maraschino and Grapefruit Juice,) a lot; but I don’t think I’ve ever sat down and made myself a regular Daiquiri. I guess it seemed too simple to be extraordinary.

The trick of dropping the the half lime shell into the shaker to get that extra bitter lime oomph, I learned from an instructive youtube video (Daiquiri) from Mr. Angus Winchester.

Like the Cuban Cocktail (No. 1), the relatively small amount of lime and sugar, leaves the Daiquiri a pretty dry and sophisticated cocktail. The flavor of the Rum and scent of the lime are front and center with just enough sweetness to take the edge off.

Simply delightful.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Culross Cocktail

Culross Cocktail

The Culross Cocktail

The Juice of 1/4 Lemon.
1/3 Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Cocchi Americano)
1/3 Bacardi Rum. (3/4 oz Flor de Cana Extra-Dry)
1/3 Apricot Brandy. (3/4 oz Blume Marillen Apricot Eau-de-Vie)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Since the Americano is a bit sweet and there isn’t much lemon in this, I thought I might take a friend’s suggestion to heart and give this one a try with an Apricot Eau-de-Vie instead of Apricot liqueur.

Wow! Really tasty, and very interesting flavors. The cinnamon and spice of the Americano are quite nice in combination with the dark apricot flavor of the Blume Marillen. One of those cocktails that leaves me smelling the glass, intrigued.

I also tried it with apricot liqueur and modern Lillet. A lot less interesting. I suppose I should have gone on with the variations and tried Lillet/Eau-de-Vie and Americano/liqueur; but, the first one was so good, I really didn’t see the need.

If Apricot Eau-de-Vie and Americano is wrong, I don’t want to be right.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Cuban Cocktail (No. 1)

Cuban Cocktail (No. 1)

Cuban Cocktail (No. 1)

The Juice of 1/4 Lemon.
1 Teaspoonful Powdered Sugar. (1 scant teaspoon Caster Sugar)
1 Glass Bacardi Rum. (2 oz Matusalem Platino)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I’ve not really ever figured out exactly the best rum to substitute for pre-prohibition

I have been using Flor de Cana Extra Dry. A friend suggested Matusalem Platino as the closest rum to HC Anejo Blanco available in America.

Flavorwise, the Platino is a very, very light rum. It smells OK and tastes fine on its own; but, once you get it in a cocktail, it is pretty much gone. To me, for all I could detect of rum in this cocktail, I might as well have used vodka.

Anyway, not entirely thrilled with the Matusalem Platino, I sent a few notes around to a few experts asking what they thought about an appropriate substitution would be.

Mr. Jeff Berry responded thusly.

You are absolutely correct to sub Flor De Cana for contemporary Bacardi, especially in 1930s-era recipes! Today’s Bacardi white rum is total garbage — and Bacardi has been deliberately turning it into garbage over the years. Since the early 1960s they’ve been chasing the vodka market — “Bacardi, the mixable one” was their old ad line from back then — by taking all the rum flavor out of their white rum to make it as neutral and tasteless as vodka. This is especially heinous because their original white rum was glorious — I tasted some 1920s Bacardi white two years ago and it was a revelation: rich, floral, distinctive, “rummy.” Finally I understood why anyone ever bothered drinking traditional Daiquiris, which taste like nothing when made with today’s white rums…Havana Club’s white rum is good, if you can get it, but for my money Flor De Cana’s white comes closest to the body and bouquet of pre-WWII white rums.

Largely flavorless rum, or not, the Cuban Cocktail is enjoyable. With 2 oz of rum and less than an half ounce of lemon, it is quite dry. The scant teaspoon of caster sugar is the perfect amount, just sweetening the cocktail enough to temper the sourness of the lemon.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.