Pineapple Julep

Pineapple Julep
(6 People)
Take a large glass jug and fill it 1/4 full of crushed ice. Pour in the juice of two oranges, a glass of Raspberry Vinegar, a glass of Maraschino, a glass and a half of Gin, and a bottle of Sparkling Moselle or Saumur. Pull a pineapple to pieces with a silver fork and place the pieces in the jug. Stir the mixture, add a little fruit for appearances’s sake, and serve.

The Pineapple Julep has always been a drink that has intrigued me. Why is it a Julep? What on earth is that Raspberry Vinegar doing in there? I didn’t think people started adding vinegar to drinks until the 21st Century! Not to mention, what’s that business with pulling a pineapple to pieces with a “silver fork”?

Since it is my suspicion that many of the older drinks came from some edition of Jerry Thomas’ “Bon Vivant’s Companion”, I thought I would check for the recipe there and see how it compares:

92. Pineapple Julep

Peel, slice, and cut up a ripe pineapple into a glass bowl, add the juice of two oranges, a gill of raspberry syrup, a gill of Maraschino, a gill of old gin, a bottle of sparkling Moselle, and about a pound of pure ice in shaves; mix, ornament with berries in season, and serve in flat glasses.

Uh, whoops, that’s quite a bit different, even if it contains most of the same elements. The biggest difference, being the Savoy’s change from “Raspberry Syrup” to “Raspberry Vinegar”. Bizarre. Typo? Intentional change?

Regarding the Sparkling Moselle in the Julep, I did some searching on the Internets and discovered that the Moselle is a region along the Mosel River in France and Germany. Sparkling wines are, or were, produced in both France (Crémant de Luxembourg) and Germany (Mosel Sekt).

Not sure which to look for a sent a quick note to Heaven’s Dog’s Wine Director, Gus Vahlkamp.

Erik: Gus, If a punch recipe from 1862 called for “Sparkling Moselle”, what
modern wine would you recommend?

Gus: Hi Erik, nice to hear from you. Yes, sekt is your best bet, although most of it comes from the Rheingau these days and not so much from Mosel. Solter is probably the easiest producer to find in SF, but I would check either at Ferry Plaza Wine Merchants or K&L for others. Also I’d imagine that 19th century sekt was probably a little sweeter than the majority of most modern products. I hope that helps. Cheers, Gus.

Well, I never mind a trip to K&L Wines, where I found a single Sekt from the Rheingau, Latitude 50 N Sekt Trocken Weiss, described as follows:

This Methode Champenoise sparkler is made from a combination of pinot blanc, muller-thurgau and silvaner. It is dry, bright and made for food, especially oysters, and this would be just the ideal sparkler to usher in a brand new 2012.

Sparkling German Wine in hand, the only thing which remained to reproduce the original Pineapple Julep Recipe was Raspberry Syrup.

I really liked the Raspberry Syrup I made for the Albemarle Fizz, so I searched the site for the recipe and whipped up another batch:

Raspberry Syrup
1/2 cup Water
1 Cup Washed Raw Sugar
1 Cup Frozen Raspberries
1 Tablespoon Balsamic Vinegar

Combine water and sugar in a saucepan over low heat. When sugar is dissolved, add raspberries and Balsamic Vinegar. Strain through chinois or cheesecloth, mashing to get as much of the liquid as possible. Cool and refrigerate. Makes about 12 ounces.

Regarding the amounts in the Jerry Thomas recipe, a “Gill” is about 4 ounces. Not sure whether Mrs. Flannestad would be up to split the Julep, I decided to make a half batch.

Lastly, depending on the wine you use and the level of sweetness in your ingredients, you may find the Julep comes out too sweet for modern tastes. I know I did, and found it significantly improved with the addition of the juice of 1/2 Lemon.

Pineapple Julep
1/2 Pineapple, peeled and chopped
2 oz Bols Aged Genever
2 oz Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur
2 oz Raspberry Syrup
Juice 1 Orange
Juice 1/2 Lemon
1/2 Bottle Sparkling Wine

METHOD: Combine Pineapple, Gin, Liqueur, Raspberry Syrup, and Juice in a bowl. Fill half way with crushed ice and top with Sparkling Wine. Stir gently, garnish with berries in season, and ladle into appropriate glassware.

My coworkers and I have occasionally joked, with the horrible ingredients that are often mixed up and sold as “nutcracker” or “crunk juice”, we should get together and bottle a high quality equivalent.

Tasting the Pineapple Julep, I believe I have a starting place for that endeavor! Alize and X Rated Fusion look out, this is some exotically tasty and easy sipping beverage! Pineapple Juleps for all my friends!

Bonus Beer of the Week! Some of my favorite Belgian Beers are actually the less strong ones. Designed to be drunk during the day by the Monks, these are tasty examples of the Belgian style, without so much alcohol.

The Witkap Pater Singel, now called “Stimulo” is one of my favorites.

Witkap·Pater Stimulo (Alc. 6% vol.) is a refreshing gold-colored beer of high fermentation and with fermentation on the bottle – thus a living beer with evolving taste. Pored with care you get a rich, white and stable foam collar with a creamy structure and sticking to the glass. You can smell the aromatic hop flowers of Erembodegem near Aalst (Belgium), a local natural product. You can also smell a strong ferment typically for the Witkap-Pater. Their are no other taste-makers used. During degustation you get a taste sensation starting with a soft mouth filling taste, passing in the a refreshing taste and ending with a tasty hop-bitter after taste.

Yum!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Ruby Fizz

First, just a reminder that Sunday, August 28, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails, (they also have a great beer selection,) on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders, (and me,) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Ruby Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Meyer Lemon)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (1/2 tsp Rich Simple Syrup)
The White of 1 Egg. (1 Egg White)
2 Dashes Raspberry or Grenadine syrup. (1 TBSP Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1 Glass Sloe Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Sloe Gin)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.
Starting to sound a bit like a Broken record! This is another Fizz from Hugo Ensslin’s 1916 “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”.

His recipe is pretty close to the Savoy recipe, except it does suggest Raspberry Syrup, not give you the choice between it and Grenadine: Juice ½ Lemon; 1 teasponful Powdered Sugar; White 1 Egg; 2 dashes Raspberry Syrup; 1 drink Sloe Gin. Shake and serve as directed for Gin Fizz.

I bounced the recipe a bit more towards the grenadine and a bit less towards the sugar.

One of the Fizzes we frequently get orders for on Savoy Nights, I never really feel any qualms at all about making it, as long as we have Plymouth Sloe Gin in the house. It is really a very tasty drink.

Though for some reason, I always think it has Port Wine in it until I look it up. I guess it is the “Ruby” in the name, as in Ruby Port.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Albemarle Fizz

First, just a reminder that Sunday, June 26, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails, (they also have a great beer selection,) on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders, (and me,) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Albemarle Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (1 tsp Caster Sugar)
1 Glass Gin. (2 oz Plymouth Gin)
Shake well strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water. Add teaspoonful Raspberry Syrup (1 tsp Homemade Raspberry Syrup*).

You’re out with a girl, you order a Gin Fizz. “For the Lady?” Perhaps an enpinkened Gin Fizz? The Cosmo of its day, no doubt.

Source: Hugo Ensslin, “Recipes for Mixed Drinks” 1916-1917, “Made same as plain Gin Fizz**, adding Raspberry Syrup.”

So I didn’t add Raspberry Syrup afterwards, as it appears the Savoy Cocktail Book is instructing you, I just shook it with the drink.

Albemarle, as in Albemarle North Carolina?

The Historic Albemarle Region

FOUR HUNDRED YEARS of History for North Carolina -indeed for the Nation- begins around the Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds.  From Sir Walter Raleigh’s Lost Colony to existing homes that stood decades before the Revolutionary War to modern-day river towns, this is a land of rich heritage.

Chartered to the Lords Proprietors before the colonies were formed with the Atlantic Ocean as its eastern boundary and encompassing much of the original colony in its domain, the original Albemarle Region now includes the Albemarle, the Pamlico-Neuse Region, and the Outer Banks region -and beyond.

The Lost Colony

In 1584, explorers Philip Amadas and Arthur Barlowe were the first English explorers to set eyes on the North Carolina. They had been sent to the area by Sir Walter Raleigh with the mission of scouting the broad sounds and estuaries in search of an ideal location for settlement. Amadas and Barlowe wrote glowing reports of the Albemarle Region, and when they returned to England a year later with two Natives, Manteo and Wanchese, all of Britain was abuzz with talk of the New World’s wonders.

Queen Elizabeth herself was impressed, and she granted Raleigh a patent to all the lands he could occupy. She named the new land “Virginia”, in honor of the Virgin Queen, and the next year, Raleigh sent a party of 100 soldiers, craftsmen and scholars to Roanoke Island.

Under the direction of Ralph Lane, the garrison was doomed from the beginning. They arrived too late in the season for planting, and supplies were dwindling rapidly. To make matters worse, Lane, a military captain, alienated the neighboring Roanoke Indians, and ultimately sealed his own fate by murdering their chief, Wingina over a stolen cup. By 1586, when Sir Francis Drake stopped at Roanoke after a plundering expedition, Lane and his men had had enough. They abandoned the settlement and returned to England.

Detained by a war with Spain, Lane would not return to Roanoke until 1590. When they arrived, they found the colony deserted with no sign of the settlers, only the work “Croatoan” carved mysteriously in a Pallisade Post.

Bonus Roanoke Trivia: The first child born in the Americas to English parents, Virginia Dare, was born in that colony three weeks after their arrival, on August 18, 1587.

In any case, this is another pleasant Fizz. My lemons are on the small side this time of the year and not particularly juicy, so the thing that is striking me about these fizzes so far, especially when making them in an 8 oz glass, is just how boozy they are. Not really tart, as they would likely be made today. Kind of nice, and frankly, drinkable.

*Raspberry Syrup
1/2 cup Water
1 Cup Washed Raw Sugar
1 Cup Frozen Raspberries
1 Tablespoon Balsamic Vinegar

Combine water and sugar in a saucepan over low heat. When sugar is dissolved, add raspberries and Balsamic Vinegar. Strain through chinois or cheesecloth, mashing to get as much of the liquid as possible. Cool and refrigerate. Makes about 12 ounces.

**Gin Fizz. Juice of ½ Lime; Juice ½ Lemon; 1 tablespoon of Powdered Sugar; 1 drink Dry Gin. Shake well in a mixing glass with cracked ice, strain into fizz glass, fill up with carbonated or any sparkling water desired.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Quaker’s Cocktail

Quaker's Cocktail

Quaker’s Cocktail

1/3 Brandy. (3/4 oz Osocalis Brandy)
1/3 Rum. (3/4 oz Barbancourt White Rum)
1/6 Lemon Juice. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/6 Raspberry Syrup. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Monin Rapberry syrup)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

This was OK, but I kind of felt like I should enjoy The Quaker Cocktail more than I did.  Maybe with a more flavorful raspberry syrup, this would have more character?

When I think of Quakers, the first thing that always comes to mind is “Simple Gifts” quoted musically and so lyrically by Aaron Copeland in his score for “Appalachian Spring”.

‘Tis the gift to be simple, ’tis the gift to be free,
‘Tis the gift to come down where we ought to be,
And when we find ourselves in the place just right,
‘Twill be in the valley of love and delight.
When true simplicity is gain’d,
To bow and to bend we shan’t be asham’d,
To turn, turn will be our delight,
Till by turning, turning we come out right.

Well, that and Richard Nixon.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Leave It To Me Cocktail (No. 2)

Leave It To Me No 2

Leave It To Me Cocktail (No. 2)

1 Teaspoonful Raspberry Syrup. (1 teaspoon Monin Raspberry Syrup)
1 Teaspoonful Lemon Juice.
1 Dash Maraschino. (1/3 tsp. Luxardo Maraschino)
3/4 Glass Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Now, we’re talking.

This is a lovely cocktail, which definitely could use some revivification.

Admittedly a bit girly, being slightly pink and a bit fruity. Still it’s not pink enough to cause alarm and with enough of a gin punch that I think any male secure in his manhood should have no problem with it.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Knickerbocker Special Cocktail

Knickerbocker Special Cocktail
Knickerbocker Special Cocktail

1 Teaspoonful Raspberry Syrup. (Monin Raspberry Syrup)
1 Teaspoonful Lemon Juice.
1 Teaspoonful Orange Juice.
1 Chunk of Pineapple.
2/3 Rum. (1 1/2 oz Inner Circle Green Rum)
2 Dashes of Curacao. (2/3 tsp. Luxardo Triplum)

(Muddle pineapple in juices and spirits. Ice, shake, and double strain into a cocktail glass.)

According to Mr. Wondrich’s book, “Imbibe!” The Knickerbocker was a popular cocktail in the mid to late 19th Century.

Jerry Thomas included a version of the drink in his 1862 book, which went like so:

Knickerbocker
(Use Small Bar-Glass.)
1/2 a lime or lemon, squeeze out the juice, and put rind and juice in the glass.
2 tea-spoonsfuls of Raspberry Syrup.
1 Wine-Glass Santa Cruz Rum.
1/2 Teaspoonful of Curacao.

Cool with shaved ice; shake up well, and ornament with berries in season.  If this is not sweet enough, put in a little more raspberry Syrup

Uh, oops. Well, if I had known that when I was making it, I would have given this drink the same controversial treatment I gave the King Cole!

Wondrich goes on to add about the Knickerbocker, “With its rum and its lime juice, its syrups and liqueurs, the Knickerbocker is the spiritual progenitor of the Tiki Drink. Think of it as an 1850s Mai Tai–similar drink, different island.”

Even in its, “somewhat bastardized form,” here in the Savoy Cocktail Book it is a very good drink for a hot day. A tad girly with the raspberry syrup, but with a pleasing and harmonious flavor that belies the seriousness of the rum lurking in the background.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Gangadine Cocktail

Gangadine Cocktail

1 Teaspoonful Framboise Syrup. (1 tsp Monin Raspberry Syrup)
1/3 Oxygenie Cusenier. (3/4 oz Kubler 53)
1/3 White Mint. (3/4 oz Brizard Creme de Menthe)
1/3 Gin. (3/4 oz Beefeater’s Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Wow, is this a pink, girly, and deadly drink. I’d give it points right there along with the Between the Sheets. I picked the Kubler, as previously I’d tried it in a cocktail with mint and thought it quite good. Also good here and didn’t muddy up the drink’s color like a Verte Absinthe would.

I’ve not turned up anything regarding the name, “Gangadine.” Might be a last name.

Oxygénée Cusenier was one of the late-pre ban French Absinthe. It was Oxygenated, supposedly to increase its purity and make it a more healthful beverage. I guess this was an attempt to combat the increasingly strident hue and cry against Absinthe as a beverage in the early 1900s.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.