Pall Mall Cocktail

Pall Mall Cocktail

Pall Mall Cocktail.
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (Angostura Orange Bitters)
1 Teaspoonful White Crème de Menthe. (Brizard White Creme de Menthe)
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Martini & Rossi Sweet Vermouth)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Original Dry Vermouth)
1/3 Plymouth Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Maybe I’m on crack, but I really enjoyed this cocktail. It was refreshing without being overwhelmingly sweet or over the top minty.

I suppose it is a sort of Martinez variation.

Not sure if the name is supposed to evoke Pall Mall cigarettes or what. But I have been known to be attracted to tobacco-ish or tobacco complementing flavors in alcoholic beverages.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

One Exciting Night Cocktail

One Exciting Night Cocktail

One Exciting Night Cocktail.

1 Dash Orange Juice. (1 Dash Blood Orange Juice)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Original Dry Vermouth)
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Punt e Mes)
1/3 Plymouth Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into Port Wine glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top. Frost edge of glass with castor sugar.

As always, your life will be much easier if you frost the edge of the glass before straining the cocktail into it.

However, faced with mandatory glass frosting in a not very tart cocktail, I opted for the more bitter flavors of Punt e Mes in this Bronx-like Cocktail. This at least provided some interesting contrasts between the bitter and sweet elements of the construction. Fairly enjoyable, but I would leave out the caster sugar, if making it for myself, even if it cut down on the excitement for the evening.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Olivette Cocktail

Olivette Cocktail

Olivette Cocktail

2 Dashes Syrup. (Scant barspoon Rich Simple Syrup)
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (Angostura Orange Bitters)
3 Dashes Absinthe. (Verte de Fougerolles)
2/3 Glass Plymouth Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass with olive and squeeze lemon peel on top.

More or less just an Improved or Fancy Plymouth Gin Cocktail, this is some pretty serious business. Lesser men need not apply.

If you have an appreciation for slightly adulterated straight spirits, on the other hand, this is not bad at all. Do give it a nice long stir, however, make it small, and drink it while it is very cold.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Charlie Lindbergh Cocktail

Charlie Lindbergh

Charlie Lindbergh Cocktail

2 Dashes Orange Juice. (2/3 tsp Orange Juice)
2 Dashes Pricota. (2/3 tsp Rothman & Winter Orchard Apricot liqueur)
1/2 Kina Lillet. (1 oz Cocchi Americano)
1/2 Plymouth Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake (stir?) well and serve in cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

I can only assume this is named after Charles Lindbergh, the aviator who flew the first successful non-stop flight between New York and Paris in May of 1927.

The cocktail itself seemed a bit, uh, “girly”. Nice enough, and all, but more of the sort of drink you’d buy for that cute girl you are trying to impress, than the sort of thing you’d have as a brace up after crossing the Atlantic.

If you want to play along and don’t have Cocchi Americano, I’d again suggest 1 oz dry vermouth, dash angosutura, dash maraschino liqueur, and an orange twist squeezed into the tin. It’s pretty close and might even be better in this particular case.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Leave It To Me Cocktail (No. 1)

Leave It To Me No 1

Leave It To Me Cocktail (No. 1)

1 Dash Lemon Juice. (1/3 tsp. Lemon Juice)
1/4 Apricot Brandy. (1/2 oz Rothman & Winter Orchard Apricot)
1/4 French Vermouth (1/2 oz Dolin French Vermouth)
1 Dash Grenadine. (1/3 tsp. Fee’s American Beauty)
1/2 Plymouth Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Well, the cocktail is a lovely light rose in hue.

And the flavor is somewhat reminiscent of childhood flavors. Unfortunately, I’d say the flavors it reminds me of are some sort of slightly medicinal eccentric English candy.

I dunno, maybe if you’re Heston Blumenthal, and nostalgia food is your thing, this might be just the ticket. Doesn’t, however, do much for me.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Hoffman House Cocktail

Hoffman House Cocktail

2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (1 dash Fee’s Orange Bitters, 1 dash Regan’s Orange)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
2/3 Plymouth Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

I can’t really think of anything interesting to say about the Hoffman House, other than, maybe, if you don’t like this you may need to adjust your perception of what constitutes a proper cocktail.

Sorry if that seems harsh, but this is pretty close to the platonic ideal, at least for me, of the Martini type cocktail.

“Slip out of these wet clothes…”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Gypsy Cocktail


Gypsy Cocktail

1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 1/2 oz Vya Sweet Vermouth)
1/2 Plymouth Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Navy Strength Gin)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Lemon Peel.)

I haven’t found Plymouth Gin to stand up particularly well against Dry Vermouth in Fifty-Fifty type cocktails, let alone sweet vermouth, so I thought the Gypsy might be a fine opportunity to call in the big guns.

The Plymouth Gypsy was really quite good, I have to say. Really kicked up the smell of the gin, vermouth, and lemon twist. But I wouldn’t recommend making any serious commitments for the rest of the evening, if you’re going to start out on this level…

There are a bunch of Cocktails that go by the name “Gypsy”. The most famous is probably the Vodka Gypsy: 1 3/4 oz Vodka, 3/4 oz Benedictine, and a dash of Aromatic Bitters. The next most famous is probably Dominick Venegas’ Gypsy: 1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin, 3/4 oz St. Germain, 1/4 oz Green Chartreuse, and 1/2 oz Lime Juice. I haven’t tried the Vodka Gypsy, but Mr. Venegas’ St. Germain drink is quite tasty.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Gimlet Cocktail

Gimlet Cocktail

1/2 Burrough’s Plymouth Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/2 Rose’s Lime Juice Cordial. (3/4 oz Rose’s Lime, 3/4 oz Fresh Lime Juice)

Stir, and serve in same glass.

Can be iced if desired.

Yeah, sorry, couldn’t quite hang with 100% Rose’s here.

I have to admit I don’t think I’ve had a gimlet for years. Now that I think about it, maybe ever. Was a favorite drink, however of one of my aunts.

All in all a pleasant cocktail. That Rose’s sure has a weird flavor, though. Tastes like Coconut or something to me. Might have to start making my own, per LibationGoddess’ procedure here.

Or if you’re lucky enough to be in San Francisco, stop by the Slanted Door and ask for a Gimlet. Jennifer Colliau has a house made lime cordial behind the bar there and it is quite spectacular.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Fine and Dandy Cocktail


Fine and Dandy Cocktail

1/4 Lemon Juice. (1/2 oz fresh lemon juice)
1/4 Cointreau. (1/2 oz Cointreau)
1/2 Plymouth Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Well, it is a “Fine and Dandy” cocktail. It doesn’t quite match the special magic of either the Pegu Club or the Sidecar. Still, all in all, quite enjoyable.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Allen (Special) Cocktail

Allen (Special) Cocktail

Dash Lemon Juice. (Juice 1/6 Lemon)
1/3 Maraschino. (3/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
2/3 Plymouth Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass (and garnish with a cherry).

First, let’s not confuse the bright red Maraschino Cherries you get in Shirley Temples with Maraschino Liqueur. You should not make this cocktail by dumping the syrup from your cherries in the shaker.

You’re going to have to hunt down some real Maraschino Liqueur before attempting this or an Aviation.

Maraschino Liqueur is made from cherries; but, somewhat indirectly.

The nice folks at Luxardo, (Maraska and Stock also make Maraschino liqueurs,) make a whole fruit Maraska Cherry Eau-de-Vie, age it briefly in Ash wood barrels, sweeten it, and then bottle it.

This is somewhat unusual, as most liqueurs are made by simply soaking fruit in alcohol and then filtering and bottling.

What you get from this process is an interesting and distinctive funky flavor. The use of the whole fruit including pits, definitely contributes some nutty almond-like notes.

Second, if you’re familiar with classic cocktails, you’ll note a striking similarity between this cocktail and the Aviation Cocktail. In fact, the only real difference between many formulations of the Allen and Aviation is the reversed proportions. The Aviation is 2/3 Gin and 1/3 Lemon Juice with a dash of Maraschino (and a dash of Violet Liqueur.) The Allen is 2/3 Gin and 1/3 Maraschino with a dash of lemon juice. This might seem a bit twiddly to us today, but, this sort of thing seems to have made a big difference to the drinkers of the early 20th Century.

In fact, I’d go on to say, that about 90% of the time when you order an Aviation in a modern bar, you’ll get something closer to an Allen than an Aviation.

In any case, the Allen cocktail is an enjoyable cocktail, and a fine feature for the Maraschino Liqueur.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.