Some Moth Cocktail

Some Moth Cocktail
1 Dash Absinthe
1/3 French Vermouth.
2/3 Plymouth Gin.
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. Add 1 pearl onion.

027

Some Moth (take 1)

1 oz Plymouth Gin
1/2 oz Genevieve
3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth
dash Greenway Distillers Absinthe
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. Add 1 pearl onion.

After making the trek to Roxie market before hand to get English Cocktail Onions, I can’t believe I forgot to include the onion the first time I made this cocktail!

Dammit!

Fortunately, it is no great hardship to make another Dry Martini with a dash of Absinthe.

Of course, I was again thinking of the Saveur article where David Wondrich mentions that Plymouth Gin used to taste more like a Genever, thus added a touch of Anchor’s Genevieve to spice things up.

032

Some Moth (take 2)

1 oz Junipero Gin
1/2 oz Genevieve
3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth
dash Greenway Distillers Absinthe
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. Add 1 pearl onion.

But when I was thinking about this cocktail, and the inclusion of Genvieve, I thought, “Why not use Junipero?” After all, being the hardcore kind of guy that I am, it is my favorite gin for Martinis.

Damn, if that isn’t a lot tastier! Maybe it is just that the flavors of Junipero and Genevieve are so complementary, but this really rocked.

As far as the cocktail onion goes, well, I’d prefer a lemon twist. It’s nice to have a little appetizer with your Martini, but the pickled onion is such a flavor explosion, it more or less decimates the rest of the cocktail when you eat it.

No idea on the cocktail name, “Some Moth,” even though I find it quite intriguing and appealing. About all I can find using Google for “some moth” is the phrase, “some moth damage,” on eBay.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sloeberry Cocktail

035

Sloeberry Cocktail
1 Dash Angostura Bitters. (1 dash Angostura)
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (1 dash The Bitter Truth Orange Bitters)
1 glass Sloe Gin. (1 oz Plymouth gin, 1 oz Plymouth Sloe Gin)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Again!? Someone cut the Sloe Gin with Plymouth Gin! My god, what is going on here!?

I thought this was some sort of documentary effort?

Sadly, even cutting the Sloe Gin with regular Plymouth Gin didn’t help much here in the Sloeberry. Far too medicinal for my taste. Though, adding a dash of orange and a dash of ango to the previous Sloe Gin Cocktail, hm…

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sloe Gin Cocktail

025

Sloe Gin Cocktail
1/4 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica Italian Vermouth)
1/2 Sloe Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin, 3/4 oz Plymouth Sloe Gin)
Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.

What the!? Now how did that happen? Someone cut the Plymouth Sloe Gin in this cocktail with half regular Plymouth Gin. Clearly, that is all wrong, and someone should be punished. Perhaps by drinking this cocktail made with all Sloe Gin.

As written above, this is quite nice, a sort of berry-ish light Negroni.  I suppose I should think of a new name.

Sloe Gin-Gin Cocktail?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Silver King Cocktail

026

Silver King Cocktail
The Juice of 1/4 Lemon.
1 Teaspoonful Sugar. (1 teaspoon caster sugar)
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (2 Dashes Bitter Truth Orange Bitters)
The White of 1 Egg. (White of 1 egg)
1 Glass Plymouth Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin, 1 oz Bols Genever)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Genever? What the!?

David Wondrich has a big article about Gin in the April, 2010 issue of Saveur Magazine. He makes the point several times that the character of Plymouth Gin has significantly changed since the 19th Century. In the article he has a quote from William Terrington’s 1869, “Cooling Cups and Dainty Drinks,” which describes historic versions of Plymouth Gin as a Gin which, “closely resembles Hollands” and another quote from 1867, which describes it as “flavour[ed] with the wash of whisky distilleries”.

With that in mind, I thought I would give what would end up a fairly plain gin sour a bit of interest by blending in some Genever with the Plymouth.

Never having made a Genver Sour, I wasn’t quite sure what to expect.

Pretty darn tasty, as a matter of fact! The Bols Genever gives the Silver King more malty complexity and a bit of earthy character.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Savoy Hotel Special Cocktail (No. 2)

023

Savoy Hotel Special Cocktail (No. 2)
2 Dashes Dubonnet. (.5ml Dubonnet Rouge)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
2/3 Plymouth Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze orange peel on top.

This is a perfectly fine Martini, and all, but I would probably only really rate it as an “OK” cocktail on technical merit. Mostly, because it is so close to being a Martini.

The use of only 2 dashes of Dubonnet Rouge is really one of those puzzling things. Even being generous, as I am here, it really doesn’t even do much to pink up the cocktail, let alone add flavor. To be honest, I’m not even sure I could tell this cocktail in a blind taste test from one made with just French Vermouth and Plymouth Gin.

Anyway, while it is only an “OK” cocktail, well made, there are far worse things than Plymouth Gin, French Vermouth, a dash of Dubonnet, and an orange twist.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Richmond Cocktail

Richmond Cocktail

Richmond Cocktail.
1/3 Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Lillet Blanc, Dash Angostura, Dash Clear Creek Kirsch, Dash Simple Syrup)
2/3 Plymouth Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

Unfortunately, still without Cocchi Americano or anything similar. And the latest rumors I’ve heard put Haus Alpenz release of Cocchi Americano at sometime early next year.

Well, until then, we’ll continue along with our substitutions.

I didn’t have the Luxardo Maraschino handy, so instead grabbed the Kirsch this time. Hm. Ended up OK, but probably not something I would revisit.

In a lot of ways, I think probably dry vermouth, angostura, orange peel, and maraschino is the best choice, instead of involving Lillet Blanc at all.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Racquet Club Cocktail

Racquet Club Cocktail

Racquet Club Cocktail.

1 Dash Orange Bitters. (Angostura Orange Bitters)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin French Vermouth)
2/3 Plymouth Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

While I don’t enjoy the Angostura Orange Bitters in fruity cocktails, I do really enjoy them in Martinis.

As to what differentiates the “Racquet Club” from a Plymouth Martini (Dry) or any number of other 2-1 Gin to Dry Vermouth Cocktails in the book, I cannot help you.

On the other hand, there is never anything wrong with a nice Racquet Club Cocktail! Though, you might want to wait until after your match. I’ve heard those balls can smart.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Prohibition Cocktail

Prohibition Cocktail

Prohibition Cocktail.

1/2 Plymouth Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/2 Kina Lillet. (1 oz Lillet Blanc, 1 Dash Angostura)
2 Dashes Orange Juice. (1/2 teaspoon Orange Juice)
1 Dash Apricot Brandy. (1 dash Rothman and Winter Orchard Apricot)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

Out of anything more interesting to use for Kina Lillet at the moment, so going with good old Lillet Blanc with a dash of Angostura Bitters.

Even without anything more interesting than Lillet Blanc, this is an enjoyable cocktail.  I can only imagine how much more tasty it would be with something like Cocchi Americano!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Polo Cocktail No. 2

Polo Cocktail No. 2

Polo Cocktail (No. 2).
1/6 Grape Fruit Juice. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Grapefruit Juice)
1/6 Orange Juice. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Orange Juice)
2/3 Plymouth Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

The Polo No. 2, on the other hand, I think you can keep. A big glass of citrus and Gin, I’m not that much of a fan.

I might go for it, but only if you served it in tall glass over rocks with a spritz of soda. But I think that’s about the only way I can see myself trying this one again.

In any case, this seems a bit dangerously potent to accompany horse croquet. At your own risk!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Peto Cocktail

Peto Cocktail

Peto Cocktail

The Juice of 1/4 Orange. (About a half an ounce of Fresh Squeezed)
1/4 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 oz Martini & Rossi Rosso Vermouth)
1/2 Plymouth gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)
2 Dashes Maraschino. (2/3 barspoon Luxardo Maraschino)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Another Bronx-ish cocktail and another Brunch possibility. Nicely refreshing with the touch of exoticism from the Maraschino. Nothing fantastic, but enjoyable.

I would guess the name of the cocktail refers to someone’s name. Painter John Frederick Peto, perhaps?

The subject matter of Peto’s paintings consisted of the most ordinary of things: pistols, horseshoes, bits of paper, keys, books, and the like. He frequently painted old time “letter racks,” which were a kind of board that used ribbons tacked into a square that held notes, letters, pencils, and photographs.

Hard to say if he enjoyed the odd drink.

We’ve also got railway and harbor developer Sir Samuel Morton Peto, an acquaintance of Charles Dickens.

Peto is also another name for the fish more commonly called “Wahoo“.

a large, swift mackerel, Acanthocybium solanderi, widespread in warm seas, of a steel blue to greenish blue above and silver below, often leaping from the water and occasionally schooling in great numbers: valued as a food and game fish.

Take your pick.

Should you order the Peto cocktail at the next Savoy Night at Alembic Bar, July 26th?

I would give this a, “Maybe.”  It is refreshing and interesting.  You could definitely do a lot worse.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.