Xeres Cocktail

Xeres Cocktail
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (1 dash Angostura Orange Bitters)
1 Dash Peach Bitters. (1 dash Fee’s Peach Bitters)
1 Glass Sherry. (2 oz Blandy’s 5 Year Alvada Madeira)
Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.

I just couldn’t find a Sherry I wanted to drink during the day before the night I had to make this.

On the other hand, I had this Madeira sitting around…

Swap one Old Wine for another?

Why not? I’ve never really bonded with most Sherry, anyway.

Wow, tasty!

Feel a little bad about messing with such a tasty Madeira, but all the same, a more than pleasing cocktail.

And, I got to share the rest of the bottle with Mrs. Flannestad after dinner!

A win for both of us.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Peter Pan Cocktail

Peter Pan Cocktail

Peter Pan Cocktail.

1/4 Peach Bitters. (1/2 oz Fee’s Peach Bitters)
1/4 Orange Juice. (1/2 oz Orange Juice)
1/4 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/4 Dry Gin. (1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I had some sort of idle hope that this would be at least interesting.

I suppose, after a fashion, it is.

The nice thing about it is the Peter Pan is, at least, a fairly dry cocktail. However, it really does taste, more or less, awful. That much peach bitters is just wrong.

Not only that, but I felt kind of bad after drinking it. Burping peach flavored burps, and feeling like it gave me an instant head ache. Maybe all that glycerine and propylene glycol doesn’t agree with me.

Should you order this cocktail at the next Savoy Night at Alembic Bar, July 26th?

Signs point to a definite, “No!”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Green Dragon Cocktail

Green Dragon Cocktail

1/8 Lemon Juice. (1/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/8 Kummel. (1/4 oz Gilka Kummel)
1/4 Green Mint. (1/2 oz Brizard Creme de Menthe)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Beefeater’s Gin)
4 Dashes Peach Bitters. (Fee’s Peach Bitters)

Shake (stir, shake, what’s it matter?) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I still haven’t taken the plunge and purchased “Green Mint,” so I guess this is a “Silver Dragon”.

In any case, talk about wacky. I mean, it’s not an unbalanced or undrinkable cocktail. Just really weird.

The Mint and Peach are the dominant elements here with everything else hanging in the background.

I didn’t throw it away. I just can’t imagine any possible circumstances where I would make it again.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Greenbriar Cocktail

Greenbriar Cocktail.

1 Dash Peach Bitters. (Fee’s Peach Bitters)
1/3 French vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
2/3 Sherry. (Bodega Dios Baco Fino Sherry)
1 Sprig Fresh Mint.

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Garnish with Mint tip.)

Pretty weird, and the peach bitters and mint make it seem awfully girly, but not unpleasant. Somehow, I could imagine the Greenbriar going well with Middle Eastern food. Especially Feta Cheese and maybe Baba Ghanoush. Not sure exactly why.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Fox River Cocktail

Fox River Cocktail

4 Dashes Peach Bitters. (1 tsp Fee’s Peach Bitters)
1 Lump of ice.
1/4 Crème de Cacao. (1/2 oz Mozart Black Chocolate Liqueur)
3/4 Canadian Club Whisky. (1 1/2 oz 40 Creek Barrel Select)

Use wineglass and squeeze lemon peel on top.

Hmmm…

Looking at this now, it seems like it should be built, old fashioned style, rather than stirred with ice and strained into a glass as I did.

All the same, I was OK with everything here except the lemon twist. I just didn’t like how the lemon combined with the chocolate, peach, and whiskey.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Derby Cocktail

Derby Cocktail

2 Dashes Peach Bitters. (Fee’s Peach bitters)
2 Sprigs Fresh Mint.
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Bombay Gin)

Shake(*) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Can you imagine what a bartender would say about you if you ordered this? “Oh, I’ll have 2 oz of gin shaken with a couple sprigs of mint and a dash or two of peach bitters.” Hell-lo, Alcoholic!

Of course, really, it is no different than the modern “super-extra-dry vodka martini,” alcohol-wise, and quite a bit tastier. According to Harry McElhone’s book, “Barflies and Cocktails” this “Recipe (is) by E.G. De Gastreaux, of Canal and Vine Streets, Cincinnati, 1903.”

Minty, peachy, cold gin. (Yeah, it does need to be really cold.)

Quite refreshing and vaguely medicinal seeming.

Might even be good for you, if you have a cold!

*I would suggest that instead of shaking the Derby, that you roll it with cracked ice. That is to say just pour it back and forth for 15 seconds or so between two shaker tins or glasses. Not quite shaking, but not quite stirring. If you shake it you’re going to pulverize the mint and all you’ll taste is bitter plant guts.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Apricot Cocktail (Sweet)

Apricot Cocktail (Sweet)
(6 People)

Dilute a teaspoonful of apricot jam (1/2 teaspoon Bonne Maman Apricot Jam) in a glass of Abricotine (1 oz Vedrenne Liqueur de Abricot). Add a teaspoonful of Peach Bitters (1/2 teaspoon Fee’s Peach Bitters), slightly less than two glasses of Gin (2 oz Beefeater’s Gin) and 2 1/2 glasses of French Vermouth (2 1/2 oz French Vermouth). Place this mixture in a shaker and put it on the ice to cool (in the freezer). When quite cold pour in two or three glasses of crushed ice and shake well. Strain into cocktail glass.

The amounts in the parenthesis are for 2 relatively modern size drinks instead of 6 tiny 1930s era drinks.

More odd instructions, to be sure.  And everyone thinks pre-prohibition cocktails are easy! A pleasant enough result, however. The Sweet version of the Apricot cocktail is definitely an after dinner drink, but it nicely highlights the nutty flavor of the apricot liqueur.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.