Whisky Fix

The Savoy recipe for the Whisky Fix is pretty basic.

Whisky Fix
1 Large Teaspoonful of Powdered White Sugar, dissolved in a little water.
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
1 Wineglass Bourbon or Rye Whisky.
Fill up the glass about 2/3 full of shaved ice, stir well, and ornament the top of the glass with fruit in season.

I felt a need to tart it up a little bit, always remembering the category dictum, “In making fixes be careful to put the lemon skin in the glass.” If you can “Improve” a Cocktail, why can’t you “Improve” a Whiskey Fix?

Improved Whiskey Fix

2 oz Evan Williams Single Barrel Bourbon
Generous Teaspoon Sugar
Peel 1/2 Small Orange

Splash Soda Water
Juice 1/2 Lemon
1/4 oz Yellow Chartreuse
Cocktail Cherry

Place the orange peel in the bottom of a heavy glass. Add a generous teaspoon of sugar. Muddle peel in sugar until it is fragrant. Add a splash of water and continue muddling until sugar is dissolved. Add the juice of 1/2 Lemon (about 3/4 oz) and the Whiskey. Add fine ice and swizzle until the glass is frosted. Float on Yellow Chartreuse. Garnish with a lemon slice and a cherry.

Harry Johnson liked to put Yellow Chartreuse in his Whiskey Daisy, so I figure it’s OK to use in a Fix. Or, as I like to say, everything is better with a little Chartreuse.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Temptation Cocktail

Temptation Cocktail
1 Piece Orange Peel.
1 Piece Lemon Peel.
2 Dashes Dubonnet. (5ml/1tsp Dubonnet Rouge)
2 Dashes Absinthe. (5ml/1tsp Greenway Distiller’s Absinthe Superior)
2 Dashes Curacao. (5ml/1tsp Brizard Curacao)
1 Glass Canadian Club Whisky. (2 oz Forty Creek 3 Grains Canadian Whisky)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Very similar to the Dandy Cocktail, (and with a similar method to the Newbury,) I do wonder where these cocktails which use citrus peels as an ingredient come from, as we have not yet identified a cocktail book as a source.

Interestingly, there’s a quote from the Hon. Wm (Cocktail) Boothby, Premier Mixologist, that addresses  this very issue:

Some of my recipes for the manufacture of cocktails order the dispenser to twist a piece of lemon peel into the glass in which the drink is to be served; in some establishments this is forbidden, the bartenders being ordered to twist and drop the peel into the mixing glass and strain the peel with the ice when putting the ice when  putting the drink into the mixing glass.  This is merely a matter of form, however, as the flavor is the same in both cases.

So it appears that in the cases of some establishments, rather than serving the peels in the drinks, they would be stirred in.

I don’t exactly agree with Boothby that the end result is the same. Stirring with the peel in the drink primarily flavors the drink with citrus oils, while squeezing over the cocktail accents the smell. I suppose for the best of both world’s you would stir with the peel in the drink, then squeeze over the finished cocktail, and discard. Whew! A lot of work!

A very tasty cocktail, the Temptation is one, like the Dandy, I feel could use a bit of a revival, certainly among those customers who like their cocktails Brown, Bitter, and Stirred. Well, unless they hate Absinthe/Anise, in which case, it might be best to stick with the Dandy.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sunshine Cocktail (No. 1)

Sunshine Cocktail (No. 1)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Ransom Old Tom)
1 Lump of Ice.
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into medium size glass. Squeeze orange peel on top.

Generally the inclusion of “1 Lump Ice” is an indication of a 19th Century Cocktail source, Jerry Thomas or similar, but I couldn’t turn this up in any likely books.

Anyway, I’ve lately been telling everyone I need to mix more with the Ransom Old Tom gin to get a better handle on its properties. This seemed like a fine excuse, being nothing other than a simplified Martinez.

And, yeah, it is quite tasty. I suppose I kind of missed the Maraschino (or Curacao) included in more elaborate recipes for the Martinez, but still, quite nice. And it wouldn’t have been anywhere near as interesting with Dry Gin.

Was having some meter/battery related problems with the camera, thus the rather Noir appearance of the photo. Suggest wearing a trench coat, packing a heater, and serving this one to a dame, naughty or nice, your choice.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sunset Cocktail

Sunset Cocktail
(6 People)
Place in a large glass the thinly-cut rind of an orange, or of a tangerine if an orange cannot be obtained. Add a teaspoonful of peach preserve, a large apricot and its crushed kernel. Pour upon the whole a full glass of Brandy and a small spoonful of Kirsch. Let this soak for two hours. Then transfer the mixture into the shaker and add half a glass of White Wine, a glass and half of Gin, and a glass of French Vermouth. Add plenty of ice. Shake and Serve.

The next thing you know about is Sunrise.

Oh for cripes sake, talk about an annoying recipe!

Let’s fix it:

Sunset Cocktail.

Sunset Cocktail
1 apricot, Quartered
1 apricot pit, crushed
2 oz Germain-Robin Fine Alambic Brandy
1 tsp. Clear Creek Kirsch
2 tsp. We Love Jam Blenheim Apricot Jam
Whole Zest of 1 Orange
2 oz Noilly Prat Dry
3 oz Right Gin*
Sparkling Wine (Blanquette de Limoux, Cuvee Berlene 2005)

Method: Combine Apricot, Apricot Pit, Brandy, Kirsch, Jam, and Orange Peel. Let stand for a couple hours. Transfer to a large mixing tin, add the dry vermouth and gin. Ice and shake gently. Double strain into medium size glasses and top up with Sparkling Wine.

Sunset Cocktail.

Well, at least the recipe, if not the technique, is slightly less annoying.

I increased the jam quotient since I decided to include the sparkling wine. It has a tendency to dry out cocktails more than regular wine would. Suggest shaking gently or even rolling to prevent pulverizing the apricot. You will want to double strain to catch those apricot and fruit pieces. You may need a spoon to encourage the liquid’s passage through the strainer.

With all that work, you would hope that it was at least tasty, and indeed, it is pretty darn tasty.

In fact, the warning, “The next thing you know about is Sunrise,” seemed a bit apt, far more easy drinking than it’s alcohol content would suggest. I would not suggest drinking all “6” Sunset Cocktails yourself, even if your wife is out of town and you aren’t driving anywhere. You will probably regret it.

*Right Gin was sent to me by a firm promoting the brand.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sleepy Head Cocktail

023

Sleepy Head Cocktail
1 Glass Brandy. (2 oz Germain-Robin Fine Alambic Brandy)
1 Piece of Orange Peel.
4 Leaves of Fresh Mint.
Fill long (iced) tumbler with Ginger Ale (Sprecher Ginger Ale).

Over the last year or so, we’ve been making a fair number of Sleepy Head Cocktails at our Savoy Cocktail Book nights at Alembic Bar. We’ve developed this slightly elaborate presentation, with the horse’s neck of orange peel and sprigs of mint, just because we’ve got them around. Plus, it makes the cocktail look cool.

In fact, if there is any problem at all with the Sleepy Head, it is that it is far, far too easy to drink quickly. Tasting like a vaguely boozy glass of ginger ale, it is no problem to slurp these down like soda pop.

Next thing you know, your head is tilting sleepily towards your companion’s shoulder, and who knows whatever might happen after they help you to your cab.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

New York Cocktail

New York Cocktail

New York Cocktail.

1 Lump Sugar. (1 Demerara sugar cube)
The Juice of 1/2 Lime or ¼ Lemon. (1/4 lemon squeezed into tin)
2 Dashes Grenadine. (1 tsp homemade)
1 Piece Orange Peel.
1 Glass Canadian Club Whisky. (2 oz Rittenhouse Bonded)

(Muddle sugar cube in lemon juice and grenadine. Squeeze orange peel over drink and drop in. Add Whiskey and…) Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.  (If you feel inspired, add a cherry.)

Similar method and ingredients to the Mr. Manhattan Cocktail.  Even though sources indicate this cocktail is from Hugo Ensslin, it makes me wonder if they might originally have come from the same source.

A perfectly delightful and “old-fashioned” preparation of a Whiskey sour.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Addington Cocktail

Addington Cocktail

1/2 French Vermouth (1 1/2 oz Boisierre Dry Vermouth)
1/2 Italian Vermouth (1 1/2 oz Noilly Prat Sweet Vermouth)

Shake well with ice and strain into a medium size glass and fill with soda water. Squeeze orange peel on top.

I seem to have skipped the Addington, in my quest to document all the “Savoy Cocktail Book” cocktails I have made. Probably because it is not really a very exciting cocktail.

If you have some of the nicer vermouths, like Carpano Antica or Vya, it would pay off to use them here. Otherwise, this is a fine low alcohol cocktail for a hot day and not much more.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.