Soul Kiss Cocktail (No. 1)

Soul Kiss Cocktail (No. 1)
1/6 Orange Juice. (1/2 oz Orange Juice)
1/6 Dubonnet. (1/2 oz Dubonnet Rouge)
1/3 French Vermouth. (1 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Carpano Antica Vermouth)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

What a name, eh? We happened to be listening to Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings new CD while listening to this, if there is more appropriate music for mixing a “Soul Kiss”, I don’t know what it is.

Most importantly, should you order this cocktail during the next Savoy Night at Alembic Bar, May 23rd, 2010? You could certainly do worse, and I think especially with the Punt e Mes we play with at Alembic this will be a rocking choice. It is not a super stiff drink, more of a slow start to the evening or something to even your keel after a couple big drinks. Nice and tasty, though.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Smiler Cocktail

001

Smiler Cocktail
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1 Dash Orange Juice. (1 Dash Tangerine Juice)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 oz Carpano Antica)
1/4 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Martini & Rossi Dry Vermouth)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Beefeater Gin)
(Strip Tangerine Peel)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

The oranges were getting a tad dry, so subbed in tangerine juice, as it is in season. To punch up the orange, I also squeezed a bit of tangerine peel over the drink and dropped it in before adding ice.

This is more or less a rather easy drinking, slightly orangey, bittered, perfect Martini.

If that’s not something to smile about, I don’t know what is.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sherry Twist Cocktail (No. 2)

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Sherry Twist Cocktail (No. 2)

(6 People)

Take the juice of 1 Orange (1/2 oz Orange Juice), 2 glasses of Whisky (1 oz Sazerac Straight Rye Whiskey), 2 1/2 glasses of Sherry (1 1/2 oz Williams Humbert Dry Sack) and 1/2 glass of Cointreau (1/4 oz Cointreau). Add two cloves (bare drop clove oil), squeeze in the juice of 1/4 lemon (1/4 oz Lemon Juice), and add half a turn of the pepper-mill (pinch cayenne pepper). Fill the shaker with cracked ice. Shake and serve.

And you thought Sherry Twist (No. 1) was weird! I found a recipe for this one in Patrick Gavin Duffy’s “Official Mixer’s Manual” which called for “a little cayenne”, instead of the black pepper in the Savoy drink. As Duffy is usually a more accurate transcriber of other’s recipes, I went with his recommendation. Also, my cloves are kind of old and tired, so I went with a touch of clove oil instead.

A similar cocktail to Sherry Twist (No. 1), this is also a sort of spiced Sherry punch for 1. It is also fairly similar in character, on the light side with a mild acidity and not much sweetness. The Cayenne gives it a little prickliness. Not sure which I preferred, perhaps No. 1, as it is a bit less complex. Still, No. 2 isn’t bad either, and both are fairly unique.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

S.G. Cocktail

010

“S.G.” Cocktail
1 Teaspoonful Grenadine. (1 teaspoon Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1/3 Canadian Club Whisky. (3/4 oz 40 Creek Three Grain)
1/3 Lemon Juice. (3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/3 Orange Juice. (3/4 oz Blood Orange Juice)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

This Cocktail is very popular in the Officers’ Mess of the Scots Guards, hence its name.

When I cut this orange open, I was surprised to discover it was a Moro Blood Orange. Lost in the back of the fridge door, I must have purchased it at some point in the past for a long forgotten project or cocktail.

Well, not to waste anything, I used it anyway.

Certainly, without the blood orange juice, the S.G. would be a far less colorful drink.

It is nice that it is colorful, tasty and refreshing. The minor amount of sweetener and relatively minor amount of whiskey make it a lot lighter than most cocktails made these days. I suppose it really is a whiskey screwdriver, but quite a bit tarter.

I find it a bit odd that the members of the Scots Guards were drinking something so mild and NOT involving Scotch Whisky. Maybe this is what they drink in the morning after the night before.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Satan’s Whiskers

028

Satan’s Whiskers Cocktail (Straight)

Of Italian Vermouth (1/2 oz Carpano Antica), French Vermouth (1/2 oz Dolin Blanc), Gin (1/2 oz Plymouth Navy Strength Gin) and Orange Juice (1/4 oz Valencia Orange Juice, 1/4 oz Sour Lemon Orange Juice), two parts each; of Grand Marnier one part (1/4 oz Grand Marnier); Orange Bitters (Regan’s Orange Bitters), a dash. Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

031

Satan’s Whiskers Cocktail (Curled)
For the Grand Marnier in the foregoing Cocktail, substitute the same quantity of Orange Curacao (1/2 oz Bols Dry Orange Curacao). Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

To be honest, I’ve never really been all that thrilled with the Satan’s Whiskers cocktail. It’s a great name, but all too often it isn’t a well balanced or interesting cocktail. Kind of like the Bronx, the quality of orange juice is almost a little too important.

The Saturday before, I headed down to the Farmers’ Market with the idle goal of finding some sort of interesting orange related fruit for the drink. Anything. Clementines, Satsumas, whatever. In my heart of hearts, I really hoped for some seville oranges, as one of the suppliers often carries them during their brief season. No seville oranges, but there was an odd box of small citrus marked, “Sour Lemon Oranges”. When I picked them up to look at them, the farmer woman said something like, good for salads and cooking! Give them a try!

032cropped

The picture above shows them with a quarter of a navel orange behind. You can see they are quite small and quite seedy. The meat is off yellow and the inner fruit peel greenish. They are really sour. I think possibly even more sour than lemons. They made a pretty fantastic honey mustard marinade for a pork tenderloin.

Anyway, back to drinks.

The recipe is a bit odd, I can’t think of another in the book written in this “parts” style. I decided to base it on 1/4 oz “parts”, as that would get me near the usual 2 1/4 oz cocktails.

A fresh-ish bottle of Carpano gives this a nice spice to go along with the sweetness.

As far as the difference between 1/4 oz of Bols Orange Curacao and 1/4 oz of Grand Marnier, I’ll be darned if I could tell the difference with all the other ingredients in this cocktail. And since the gin is such a small proportion, I figured Navy Strength Plymouth wouldn’t be a bad idea. It definitely wasn’t.

Maybe Satan’s Whiskers aren’t so bad after all!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Roy Howard Cocktail

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Roy Howard Cocktail.
1/2 Glass Kina Lillet. (1 oz Lillet Blanc)
1/4 Glass Brandy. (1/2 oz Chateau Pellehaut Armagnac)
1/4 Glass Orange Juice. (1/2 oz Orange Juice)
2 Dashes Grenadine. (Dash Homemade Grenadine)
(dash Angostura)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

This is actually quite enjoyable, despite its low alcohol content. Not enough juice to make it overly fruity, beyond the wine. And, indeed, the sweet/sour balance is closer to that of a wine that a sour cocktail.

Roy W. Howard, if indeed it is his namesake cocktail,was a correspondent for the Scripps McRae Newspapers and the president of United Press.

He moved to Scripps newspapers in 1920, and, by 1922, he was leading the company. He bought and consolidated newspapers and instituted a practice of investigative and public service journalism that, over the next decades, led to breaking union racketeering, uncovering bank scandals, exposing political corruption and prompting governmental safety regulations in the workplace.

Quite a lot of accomplishments, really. I can see why you would want a relatively low voltage cocktail to be able to keep your wits about you.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Robson Cocktail

Robson Cocktail

Robson Cocktail.
1/8 Lemon Juice. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/8 Orange Juice. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Orange Juice)
1/4 Grenadine. (3/4 oz Homemade Grenadine)
1/2 Jamaica Rum. (1 1/2 oz Appleton V/X Rum)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Actually, this is exactly what I would consider a “Planter’s Punch”, as opposed to those two earlier “Planter’s Cocktails” (No. 1 and No. 2).  Multiple Citrus, check.  Grenadine, check.  Jamaican Rum, check.  Yep, that’s a “Planter’s Punch” all right.

Tasty, too, though you could probably go with something a bit more distinctive than the Appleton V/X.  Coruba might be awesome, or Haus Alpenz’ Smith and Cross Jamaica Rum, if you were feeling adventurous.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Raymond Hitch Cocktail

Raymond Hitch Cocktail

Raymond Hitch Cocktail.
The Juice of 1/2 Orange.
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (Angostura Orange Bitters)
1 Slice Pineapple.
1 Glass Italian Vermouth. (2 oz Carpano Antica Vermouth)
(Muddle Pineapple in orange juice and…) Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

A tasty, light and slightly exotic Low Alcohol Cocktail, the Savoy Raymond Hitch would be a pleasant before dinner diversion.

In his 1917 book, “Recipes for Mixed Drinks,” Hugo Ensslin gives this the clever name, “Raymond Hitchcocktail”.

From Answers.com:

Raymond Hitchcock

“Hitchcock, Raymond (1865–1929), comic actor and producer. Described by Stanley Green as “a lanky, raspy?voiced comic with sharp features and straw?colored hair that he brushed across his forehead,” he was born in Auburn, New York, and came to the theatre after some unhappy years in other trades. From 1890 on he began to call attention to himself in musicals such as The Brigands and The Golden Wedding. His performance in King Dodo (1901) made him a star…”

Interestingly, his last great theater role may have been as Clem Hawley in the stage version of Don Marquis’ The Old Soak.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Pruneaux Cocktail

Pruneaux Cocktail

Pruneaux Cocktail
(6 People)
2 Glasses of Gin (1 oz Junipero Gin), 2 of Sherry (1 oz Bodega Dios Baco Amontillado), 1 of Syrup of Prunes (1/2 oz Prune Syrup) and 1 of strained Orange Juice (1/2 oz orange juice). Shake thoroughly in cracked ice, and serve.

Right, well, sure “Syrup of Prunes” isn’t exactly a SEXY ingredient, with its promises of regularity and high fiber content.

All the same, it’s a darn tasty sweetener! Kinda raisin-ey and complex, especially following the procedure below, this isn’t something to be laughed at.

It is a bit of an odd bird of a cocktail. Gin, Sherry, Orange Juice, and prune syrup. Actually, this cocktail, the Blues Cocktail, and the Ship Cocktail are the only three in the book that call for Prune Syrup.

Not exactly a Martinez. Complex and sorta fruity. It would be really interesting to put this in front of someone blind.

I really enjoyed it. And the prunes cooked in the syrup are delicious to eat!

*From Eddie Clarke’s Shaking in the Sixties, “Prune Syrup. Put one lb of prunes (which have been soaked in cold water for 24 hours) into a saucepan with two heaped teaspoonfuls of brown sugar, a piece of vanilla, and enough cold water to cover them. Boil until half the liquid has disappeared, then add a tumblerful of claret and simmer until the prunes are cooked. You may add a port glass of brandy to the prunes about ten minutes before removing them. Strain the contents of the saucepan and then pass the juice through muslin. When it is cool put it in a bottle and cork tightly. This syrup will keep for two to three weeks. The prunes, of course, are delicious to eat.”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Prohibition Cocktail

Prohibition Cocktail

Prohibition Cocktail.

1/2 Plymouth Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/2 Kina Lillet. (1 oz Lillet Blanc, 1 Dash Angostura)
2 Dashes Orange Juice. (1/2 teaspoon Orange Juice)
1 Dash Apricot Brandy. (1 dash Rothman and Winter Orchard Apricot)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

Out of anything more interesting to use for Kina Lillet at the moment, so going with good old Lillet Blanc with a dash of Angostura Bitters.

Even without anything more interesting than Lillet Blanc, this is an enjoyable cocktail.  I can only imagine how much more tasty it would be with something like Cocchi Americano!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.