Volstead Cocktail

Volstead Cocktail
1/4 Lime Juice. (1/2 oz Lime Juice)
3/4 Orange Juice. (1 1/2 oz Orange Juice)
1 Dash of Hercules. (Dash Campari)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Crap! I was out of my home made Hercules when this puppy rolled around.

Anyway, I believe the whole point of this cocktail is that it is non-alcoholic, except for a little bit of potable bitters, so I went with Campari instead. Quite tart!

Interestingly, Harry McElhone’s “ABC of Cocktails”, contains a cocktail with the same name and completely different ingredients: 1/3 Rye Whiskey; 1/3 Swedish Punsch; 1/6 Orange Juice; 1/6 Syrup Framboise; 1 dash of anisette Marie Brizard.

About his nominally more appealing version of the Volstead, McElhone opines:

This cocktail was invented at the Harry’s New York Bar, Paris, in honor of Mr. Andrew J. Volstead, who brought out the Dry Act in U.S.A. and was the means of sending to Europe such large numbers of Americans to quench their thirst.

Not just to Europe, but Mexico, Canada, and Cuba all had their tourism industries jump started by Prohibition and American’s thirst for the hard stuff.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Valencia Cocktail (No. 2)

First, just a reminder that Sunday, October 31st, 2010, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders (and me) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Valencia Cocktail (No. 2)
4 Dashes Orange Bitters. (4 dashes Angustura Orange Bitters)
1/3 Orange Juice. (3/4 oz Fresh Orange Juice)
2/3 Apricot Brandy. (1 1/2 oz Brizard Apry Liqueur)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass, and fill with Champagne (Cavas Hill Cava). (Long Orange Peel Garnish.)

Hm, there really is the kernel of a good drink here, but this is far, far too sweet.

Let’s re-imagine this just a bit:

4 dashes Angostura Orange Bitters
3/4 oz Orange Juice
3/4 oz Brizard Apry
3/4 oz Chateau Pellehaut Armagnac
Cava

Ah, now that is much better, in fact pretty close to delicious and recommendable. Definitely an improvement over your bog standard Mimosa or Bellini. Brunch with a kick.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Valencia Cocktail (No. 1)

First, just a reminder that Sunday, October 31st, 2010, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders (and me) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Valencia Cocktail (No. 1)
4 Dashes Orange Bitters. (4 dashes Angostura Orange Bitters)
1/3 Orange Juice. (3/4 oz Valencia Orange Juice)
2/3 Apricot Brandy. (1 1/2 oz Brizard Apry)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Well, it isn’t bad, exactly, if it is a bit sweet. Just needs a little jolt, would some booze have killed anyone? At least you are allowed a rather generous hand with the bitters.

One of those cocktails, and there are many, which makes you wonder over the character of juice oranges in the early part of the 20th Century.

PS. There was no Whiskey in this cocktail, even though there is a bottle in the picture, and the cocktail could have used some. That was just leftover from the Up-To-Date.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Twin Six Cocktail

Twin Six Cocktail
1 Dash Grenadine. (2.5ml or 1/2 tsp Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
4 Dashes Orange Juice. (10ml or 2 tsp Orange Juice)
The White of 1 Egg. (1/2 oz Egg White)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 oz Carpano Antica)
3/4 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Ransom Old Tom Gin)
Shake well and strain into medium size glass.
I can think of no reason, other than sheer perversity, and a burning question about how the Ransom Old Tom would work in an egg white drink, that I decided to mix up the Twin Six with that gin. There is no way this recipe, originally from Hugo Ensslin’s 1917 book, “Recipes for Mixed Drinks” could possibly be interpreted to include Old Tom.

The name, it appears, referred to a 12 Cylinder engine which the American Auto manufacturer Packard introduced in 1916.

From an article on Driving Today, Packard Twin Six:

The American public went wild over the Twin Six, which they saw as further proof that the United States was the best car-building nation on Earth. When the car was first put on display, some dealers had to call in the police to handle the curious throngs wanting to see the wondrous V-12 engine.

If the Twin Six Engine was noted for it’s, “smooth acceleration in high gear and sufficient power to propel some of the models to 70 mph,” the Twin Six Cocktail could be considered similar in many ways. A relatively strong cocktail, for a sour, it is mostly just the egg white and touch of Italian Vermouth which are smoothing over the power of the gin. I would definitely call this a “deceptively drinkable” cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Tango Cocktail

Tango Cocktail
2 Dashes Curacao. (5ml/1tsp Brizard Orange Curacao)
The Juice of 1/4 Orange. (Juice and peel 1/4 Navel Orange)
1/4 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 oz Carpano Antica Vermouth)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Tanqueray Dry Gin)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Garnish with long ribbon Orange Peel.)

Harry McElhone, the likely source for the recipe, formats it slightly differently in his book, “Barflies and Cocktails” : 1/6 Curacao; 1/6 Orange Juice; 1/3 Italian Vermouth; 1/3 Plymouth Gin. He also notes this is a, “Recipe by Harry, Bartender Palermo, Rue Fontaine, Paris.”

Hm, I hate to mention this to the Harrys, but isn’t the Tango the same cocktail as the Satan’s Whiskers?

Anyway, when we served the Satan’s Whiskers at Heaven’s Dog for our special Halloween menu last year, Erik Adkins had the insight to note, “Don’t over shake this drink.  Most of the ingredients have a low abv plus there is oj.  The drink should have a strong middle.”

That piece of advice has significantly improved my opinion of the Satan’s Whiskers as a cocktail. Well, that along with including a piece of orange peel in the shaker for added citrus ooomph.

I still think Satan’s Whiskers is a better name than it is a cocktail, per se, but for those occasions when a stiff drink might be a little too stiff, it is a nice option to have.

At Heaven’s Dog, we also sometimes make another rather amusingly named variation on this theme, “Satan’s Soul Patch”, which substitutes Bourbon for Gin and has a flamed orange peel as a garnish.

Don’t tell the manly men who usually order this drink, Satan’s Whiskers, or Satan’s Soul Patch that they are mostly drinking Vermouth and Orange Juice!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Tanglefoot Cocktail

Tanglefoot Cocktail
1/6 Orange Juice. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Blood Orange Juice)
1/6 Lemon Juice. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/3 Bacardi Rum. (3/4 oz Barbancourt White Rum)
1/3 Swedish Punch. (3/4 oz Underhill Punsch)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

“T”! Wow! How many cocktails can be in T, U, V, X, Y, and Z? Well, actually, there are a fair number of cocktails in T and W, about an 100 more “Cocktails” before I hit the real final stretch of fizzes, juleps, cups and other “Fancy Drinks”. Still reason enough to “Smile”.

In his book, “Barflies and Cocktails,” Harry McElhone notes this is a “Recipe by Charly Kinney at Harry’s New York Bar, Paris.”

I only had a blood orange, so that’s what I had to use in the cocktail.

I was also feeling like a funkier rum would be a better complement to the Swedish Punch, so went with the Barbancourt.

Was definitely right about that!  This was quite a tasty formulation, with the tart early season blood oranges, lemon, Barbancourt, and Swedish Punch.  If you’ve got Swedish Punch, this would definitely be on my list of the top 2 or 3 cocktails to make with it.

Strangely, the best definition I can find for Tanglefoot is “cheap whiskey”.  I’m kind of guessing, this might be a drink that would result in your tangling up your dancing feet, that is, if you drank 3 or 4.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sweet Patootie Cocktail

Sweet Patootie Cocktail
1/4 Orange Juice. (1/2 oz Orange Juice)
1/4 Cointreau. (1/2 oz Cointreau)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Ransom Old Tom)
(1 dash Angostura Orange Bitters)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Hm, how did that Angostura Bitters get in there? Weird. Sometimes I go through my notes about the cocktails and kind of wonder what I was thinking! Well, I do prefer an Income Tax to a Brooklyn, (Err, I mean Bronx!, thanks Matt,) and oranges were undoubtedly smaller and probably more bitter before modern super market breeding took over. Even possible vintage Cointreau was a bit different in character.

In regards Ransom, well, I am curious about using it in different contexts, and, well, I find most dry gin cocktails which call for orange juice a bit boring on their own.

However, aside from a goofy name, this slightly more elaborate relative of the Orange Blossom doesn’t have a whole lot to recommend it.  Maybe if you were to use a bitter or esoteric variety of orange.  Tangerine?  With Navels or Valencias, there just isn’t a whole lot here.  The Ransom Old Tom ups the interest factor a bit, and is fairly tasty, but not quite enough to make this a slam dunk.

Very single notedly Orange.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Strawberry Cocktail

Strawberry Cocktail
Pass 1 lb. of strawberries through a hair-sieve, and pour the juice into the shaker, together with the juice of an orange and a dash of Whiskey. Add a few pieces of ice. Shake carefully and serve.

Luckily it is Strawberry season!

I juiced 1 pint of Strawberries with my cast aluminum Universal Juicer and poured it into a cocktail shaker. Added the juice of 1/2 large Valencia Orange. Added a splash of W.L. Weller 12. Shook briefly and double strained into cocktail glasses.

Is it tasty? Yes. Is it a cocktail? Not really, it’s fruit juice with a dash of whisky. Surprised this isn’t in the “Cocktails Suitable for a Prohibition Country” or “Non-Alcoholic Cocktails” section of the book.

Kind of a fun fruit tonic for Spring Strawberry season, I suppose.

I think I would prefer it, and it would be much more economical, if you made it as a long drink, over ice, with soda or ginger ale.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Spencer Cocktail

Spencer Cocktail
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1 Dash Orange Juice.
1/3 Apricot Brandy. (3/4 oz Brizard Apry)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass Add a cherry (Toschi Amarena Cherry) and squeeze orange peel on top.

Very mellifluous: has a fine and rapid action: for morning work.

With such a positive description, I had high hopes for this one. I went with a relatively soft, fruit friendly gin with the Plymouth and hoped for the best.

I dunno, not sure if it is the gin choice, or the sad deserted 5 year old bottle of Brizard Apry, but I really wasn’t feeling this. Funny, I think Brizard Apry was one of my first great ingredient quests, predating the Savoy Project. Just as I started looking for a bottle, it disappeared from the shelves. I must have bothered the liquor store manager for 6 months before it finally became available again.

The Spencer is just kind of bland and sweet. Maybe a more generous hand with the bitters? Or perhaps the Rothman & Winter Orchard Apricot would be an improvement. I have had very good luck with it in the past. Unfortunately, I need a new bottle.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Soul Kiss Cocktail (No. 2)

Soul Kiss Cocktail (No. 2)

1/6 Orange Juice. (1/2 oz Orange Juice)
1/6 Dubonnet. (1/2 oz Dubonnet Rouge)
1/3 French Vermouth. (1 oz Carpano Antica)
1/3 Canadian Club Whisky. (1 oz Thomas Handy Rye Whiskey)
1 Slice of Orange.

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Uh, oops, it appears I misremembered the type of vermouth in this cocktail while making it and didn’t notice until now.

Shoot, I blame the lovely, funky, music from Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings, along with a strange tendency to make Rye Whiskey Cocktails which call for Dry Vermouth with Sweet Vermouth.

I have the same problem with the Brooklyn. Every time I think about making it, I try to remember, this cocktail is made with Dry Vermouth. But then every time I make it, somehow Sweet Vermouth ends up in the mixing glass. It’s just weird. Then I make a Brooklyn correctly, and think, yep, you know, I prefer this with Sweet Vermouth. Just like the Old Pal vs. the Boulevardier.

I will note that, as with most cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book calling for “Canadian Club”, the source recipe for this cocktail, “Harry’s ABC,” calls for Rye Whiskey, not Canadian. And I think that is the correct choice.

This was a rather popular drink among those who tried it. “Tastes like a Manhattan,” was one comment, and they asked for the recipe. I really liked it, as well. It is a kind of fruity, but not too fruity, Manhattan.

Anecdote: Last Savoy night, one of the servers ordered a “Soul Kiss Cocktail” without specifying 1 or 2. Tim asked me which to make. I said, “No 2 has Rye Whiskey, that’s the one I would make. In fact, I would go so far as to call that a defining philosophy. If it has whiskey, it is the right choice.” He agreed.

Most importantly, should you order this cocktail during the next Savoy Night at Alembic Bar, May 23rd, 2010? Well, damn. If you order it from me, there’s still a fighting chance that I will again have a brain fart and make it with Italian Vermouth instead of Dry Vermouth. Probably one of the more competent Alembic bartenders will make it “correctly”. You might have to take your chances with this one. Pretty sure it is a good cocktail either way.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.