Other Uses for Pistachio Syrup

You might recall, I made a Pistachio Syrup to recreate the Mustachi-ode from Booker & Dax.

While the Mustachi-ode is a fantastic drink, I’ve been experimenting with other uses for the syrup.

The first easiest targets are mostly simple substitutions for Orgeat.

Here are a couple interesting, and so far unnamed, things to try with Pistachio Syrup:

2 oz Tequila Ocho Blanc
Heavy Barspoon Pistachio Syrup
2 dash Miracle Mile Chocolate Chile Bitters

Stir and strain into a small cocktail glass. Grate fresh Cinnamon on top.

Obvious riff on the Japanese Cocktail, really like how this highlights the interesting vegetal characteristics of the Ocho.

1 1/2 oz Barbancourt 8 Rum
1/2 oz Neissen Blanc Rhum Agricole
1 oz Lime Juice
1/2 oz Pistachio Syrup
1/2 oz Orange Curacao

Shake and strain over cracked ice in a 10 oz glass. Garnish with Mint Sprig and Lime Wheel Cherry Boat.

Fairly literal Mai Tai variation, for me the nut character of the Pistachio syrup really pops in this.

Of course, if you don’t feel like making Pistachio Syrup yourself, you can always stop by Heaven’s Dog!

Tequila Daisy

Tequila Daisy

2 oz Tequila Ocho Blanco*
Juice 1 Lime
1/2 oz Bols Dry Orange Curacao
1/2 oz Rich Simple Syrup
Soda Water

Peel a lime as for an apple, and place in a cocktail glass. Shake other ingredients thoroughly on cracked ice and strain over fresh crushed ice in the glass. Garnish with fresh fruit, in season, Mint Sprig, and fill with soda water.

One of the many theories about the name of the Margarita is that it is the Spanish word for “Daisy”. That the Margarita is exactly that, a Tequila Daisy.

It’s an OK theory, I suppose, holds about as much water as any of the other ones. The main problem being, every Daisy recipe I’ve read calls for Soda Water and I’ve never, ever, seen a Margarita recipe which calls for Soda.

Delicious, though the Tequila Daisy is, if you’re going to go in the drink family direction, I think you’re better off sticking with the Tequila Sidecar.

But, to wrap it up, what exactly is a Daisy?

A Daisy should have a generous pour of a base spirit, citrus, sweetener and fizz. Many examples include elaborate garnishes.

As far as preparation goes, it seems like most of the early recipes for Daisies are shaken and strained into a glass, NOT served on ice. Personally, like Hugo Ensslin, I usually serve them on cracked ice, just to differentiate them from the Fizz category.

After that, the sky’s the limit. Pretty much any sweetener, any citrus, and any spirit seem to be allowed in the category. Heck, I see no reason not to mess with the fizz aspect.

Experiment and tell me what you get.

*I received the Tequila Ocho Blanco from a firm promoting the brand.

Derby Fizz

Derby Fizz
5 Dashes Lemon Juice. (Generous squeeze Lemon Juice)
1 Teaspoonful of Powdered Sugar. (1 teaspoon of Caster Sugar)
1 Egg.
1 Glass Canadian Club or Scotch Whisky. (2 oz Highland Park 8 Year, the MacPhail’s Collection)
3 Dashes Curacao. (1 teaspoon Clement Creole Shrubb)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with soda water.

Clearly, I am going to catch Scotch whisky nerd hell for making this drink with the 8 year Highland Park Whisky from The MacPhail’s Collection. However, the only blended Scotch whisky I have is the Famous Grouse, and, as far as I can tell, you might as well use vodka as Famous Grouse.

Anyway, this is the youngest Single Malt I have in the house, and not a particularly expensive dram, either. But I do like it. It has a lot of the same character as the Highland Park 12, but with a little less polish and a lot more youthful vigor. I usually drink it with some water, as it is, so a cocktail didn’t seem like much of a stretch.

I have to admit, though, I’m on the fence whether the Highland Park was wasted in the Derby Fizz. Definitely, with a whole egg and soda water, any less assertive Scotch wouldn’t have had much impact at all.

Also, this is not a particularly sour Fizz, basically April’s Egg Sour with a splash of soda, and, as such, I think that serves featuring the whiskey well.

Still, the drink ends up being a little rich for my taste, at least for early evening drinking. Though, it might be a way to get your protein at Breakfast without having to choke down some god awful over-cheesed omelet and mushy hash browns. Cup of coffee on the side and you’ve got a nice peaty, smoky liquid Brunch. Just be glad I didn’t garnish the Derby Fizz with a strip of bacon…

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Will Rogers Cocktail

Will Rogers Cocktail
1/4 Orange Juice. (3/4 oz Orange Juice)
1/4 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Vya Dry Vermouth)
1/2 Plymouth Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin, 3/4 oz Bols Genever)
4 Dashes Curacao. (1 tsp Bols Dry Orange Curacao)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I’m not quite sure how to handle a figure quite so mythic to the early part of the 20th Century as Will Rogers.

The best thing I could find about him is this kind of long video segment from some time in the 50s, but I still don’t think it conveys the extent of his influence on popular culture during the depression as the Cowboy Poet, Philosopher and voice of reason.

Well, if there’s a cocktail named after him, the first thing I tried to find was some information about whether he did in fact take a drink now and then.

I did find a google book result from a speech he gave shortly after the enactment of prohibition, it comes from a book, “In Our Own Words: Extraordinary Speeches of the American Century”.

I have often said that wish the wets would become so soused they would be speechless and couldn’t say anything, and that the drys would become so perfect that the Lord would come down and take them away from here–and that would leave the country to the rest of us who are tired of listening to both of them.

Aside from this sensible bon mot, I find not a whole lot of evidence against Will Rogers either as a dry or wet, particularly, though some other quotes indicate he may have had some familiarity with Whiskey.

The cocktail itself is an inoffensive draught, a slightly orangey Dry Martini.

I am bulking up the the bog standard modern Plymouth with a bit of Bols Genever for body and maltiness.

I hadn’t tried the Vya Dry Vermouth for a few years, and this evening it was either that or Martini & Rossi Extra Dry at the Grocery. I am unclear I made the right choice. It was, as usual for me, the more expensive choice. But, I don’t know, there is a surprising amount of bitter character to the Vya dry vermouth. And, as a friend once remarked, “it doesn’t really taste like Vermouth. More like mulled wine.”

Well, it doesn’t really hurt anything in the Will Rogers.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Weeseur Special Cocktail

Weeseur Special Cocktail.
4 Dashes Absinthe. (1 tsp. Absinthe)
1/4 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 oz Carpano Antica)
1/4 Orange Curacao. (1/2 oz Clement Creole Shrubb)
1/4 Dry Gin. (1/2 oz Junipero Gin)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

As a variation on the Martini (Medium), or perhaps Fourth Degree, the Weeseur isn’t bad. I do like the Creole Shrubb and awful lot, it is one of my favorite Orange Liqueurs, so I rarely complain when I get a excuse to use it.

The name seems like it should be Dutch or Afrikaans, but I can find no trace of Weeseur on the web that makes any sense.

Note the presence of the exciting new Cocktail Kingdom measuring jigger!

Cocktail Kingdom Japanese Style Jigger 22ml/15ml

Finally a Japanese-style jigger with a 3/4oz side (or 22ml for those of you who are metrically inclined)! Been waiting for this for quite some time.

I also know that the gentlemen of Cocktail Kingdom went to quite some trouble to find a manufacturer who could deliver an accurate 3/4 oz jigger.

In fact, when I was in New York recently, another bartender showed me how badly calibrated some of the usual bar supplies conical stainless jiggers were. Some were off by as much as 1/8 ounce when compared withe the Cocktail Kingdom Jigger.

I checked mine at home with the Cocktail Kingdom Jigger and found them not quite that far off. Whew!

The big problem now is I usually use 3 jiggers: 1/2:1, 3/4:11/2, 1:2.

Now I have to get used to using only two jiggers: 1/2:3/4 and 1:11/2.

Well, if I ever want to work in NY, I guess I’ll have to.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Third Rail Cocktail (No. 1)

Third Rail Cocktail (No. 1)
1 Dash White Mint. (1 dash Brizard Creme de Menthe)
1 Dash Curacao. (1 dash Brizard Orange Curacao)
1 Glass French Vermouth. (2 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I had some small, idle, hope that this would somehow be another Chrysanthemum Cocktail, an overlooked, light classic.

Well, maybe, if you really like mint, but other wise, it is probably best to heed the sensible advice of many civilizations, and don’t touch the Third Rail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Southern Gin Cocktail

Southern Gin Cocktail
2 Dashes Curacao. (5ml/1tsp Brizard Orange Curacao)
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (2 dashes Regan’s Orange Bitters)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Junipero Gin)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Squeeze Orange Peel over glass and drop in.)

Wow, well, while, like the Aviation Cocktail, this comes from Hugo Ensslin’s “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”. Unlike the Aviation, I don’t think you’ll be seeing it on any bar menus in the near future. Talk about your gin Cock-tails, this is exactly that, a literal 19th Century style “Gin Cocktail”. If you don’t really enjoy the gin you’re mixing with, this cocktail is not going to fix it.

Most importantly, should you order this cocktail tonight, May 23, during the next Savoy Night at Alembic Bar? You know, with an Old Tom or Genever, this might be an interesting cocktail. But with a Dry Gin, this is pretty much just a big, cold, glass of slightly orangey gin. Unless you’re ready to deal with that, this is probably not the cocktail for you.

Hope to see you tonight from 6PM on, at Alembic Bar, next to the Red Vic, in the Upper Haight!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Snyder Cocktail

010

Snyder Cocktail
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Martini & Rossi Dry Vermouth)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Tanqueray Gin)
3 Dashes Curacao. (7.5ml Brizard Orange Curacao)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. Twist orange peel on top.

Like the recent Smiler Cocktail, an orangey Martini. This time instead of perfect, rather dry. Used Tanqueray, as it was in the house, free, and recently given the “Chairman’s Trophy” for a gin used in an Extra Dry Martini by the Ultimate Beverage Cocktail Challenge. In fact, they went so far as to say it was, “Extraordinary” and given the “Ultimate Recommendation” for that drink.  Wow!  That is SOME Accolade.  Though it is interesting how all the gins judged were made by very large firms, is it not?

I don’t know who Snyder might have been, nor do I find his cocktail particularly compelling, as Martini variants go, even with the “Extraordinary” Tanqueray gin.

Perfectly fine and drinkable, to be sure, just not that much of an improvement over the traditional Dry Martini.

I definitely wouldn’t go out of my way to order it.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Newbury Cocktail

Newbury

Newbury Cocktail.

1 Piece Lemon Peel.
1 Piece Orange Peel.
3 Dashes Curacao. (1 tsp. Bols Dry Orange Curacao)
1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Dolin Rouge Vermouth)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Junipero Gin)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Kind of similar to the Dandy Cocktail, it make me wonder if those two recipes might have the same source.

Check out the new vintage glassware, fresh from the wilds of central New Jersey, courtesy of Chris over at An Exercise in Hospitality!  So cool, and beautifully retro!  Thanks Chris!

Anyway, a very nice cocktail, despite being basically a slightly citrus-ier Lone Tree.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Maiden’s Blush Cocktail (No. 1)

Maiden's Blush Cocktail

Maiden’s Blush Cocktail (No. 1)

1 Dash Lemon Juice. (1/3 tsp Lemon Juice)
4 Dashes Orange Curacao. (generous 1 tsp. Bols Dry Orange Curacao)
4 Dashes Grenadine. (generous 1 tsp. Homemade Grenadine)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Luxardo Cherry.)

Apparently Maidens of yore were made of sterner stuff than they are today. It looks like a Cosmo, but it’s mostly a glass of cold gin.

And this one definitely needs a cherry.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.