Not-Groni

Oh, right, it’s Negroni week. Awesome. Another FoodBev industry circle jerk, like this industry needs an excuse to overindulge.

Oh, right, a portion is donated to charity. It’s for the kids, we’re drinking for the children.

Anyway, a friend stopped by the bar Monday and after he had sampled our blended and barrel aged Negronis on offer for Negroni Week, he said he wanted to venture off menu and try a Negroni variation with No 3 London Dry Gin, Cynar, and Vermouth.

Gin, Cynar, and Vermouth, you say?

I can do that!

I felt a bit inspired by the Chrysanthemum Cocktail for it, and came up with this “Not-Groni”, “Reverse-Negroni,” or maybe “Mixed Up Negroni”. I believe my friend was calling it a “Gron-i-mum”.

1 1/2 oz Dolin Blanc Vermouth
1 oz Beefeater Gin
1/2 oz Cynar

Stir with ice and strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with Grapefruit twist.

Usually when people “lighten” Negronis, they increase the Gin and decrease the Campari and Italian Vermouth by equal parts. But, really, it is the sweetness of the Campari that is weighing down the drink. Swapping in a Blanc for the Red Vermouth and pumping it up turns a digestiv cocktail into and aperitif.

Oh, oops, I didn’t use the No 3 Gin, how on earth did that happen?

White Negroni

From Suze

Tried three white negroni variations last night using the ratios from the PDT Cocktail Book ratio as a starting point.

2 oz Plymouth Gin
3/4 oz Lillet Blanc
1/2 oz Suze

2 oz Plymouth Gin
3/4 oz Dolin Blanc
1/2 oz Salers

2 oz Plymouth Gin
3/4 oz Tempus Fugit Kina l’Avion d’Or
1/2 oz Tempus Fugit Grand Classico Bitter

The first is the original White Negroni created by Wayne Collins when a friend gave him some Suze to play with. I am gradually coming to the conclusion that either my Suze is tired, or I just don’t like it. The original was my least favorite of the bunch. I kind of kept thinking, it would have been a perfectly fine cocktail, if it didn’t have the Suze in it.

According to some friends, a recipe for a ‘white negroni’ is being made at Dutch Kills in New York using Dolin Blanc instead of Lillet Blanc. This was a nice feature for the Saler’s, and a tasty cocktail, though it really didn’t evoke the aesthetic of a Negroni.

The third was the most ‘negroni’ of the three, adding the herbal accents of the Gran Classico. Guests were split about 50-50 between it and a classic negroni.