Cherry Mixture Cocktail

Cherry Mixture Cocktail
Cherry Mixture Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters (Very Healthy Dash)
1 Dash Maraschino (Luxardo Maraschino Cocktail)
1/2 French Vermouth (2 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/2 Italian Vermouth (2 oz Carpano Antica)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass (Build over cracked ice in a double old fashioned glass, stir briefly to chill). Serve with cherry (3 Amarena Toschi Cherries).

A bit of a radical departure from the method.

I just find I enjoy these vermouth type “cocktails” more over ice than up, so there you go.

Quite enjoyed this formulation. A bit on the sweet side. A slightly less bitter Americano ? Maybe most appropriate as a digestiv?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Casino Cocktail

Casino Cocktail

Casino Cocktail

2 Dashes Maraschino (2/3 tsp Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur)
2 Dashes Orange Bitters (generous couple splashes Regan’s Orange Bitters)
2 Dashes Lemon Juice (2/3 tsp Lemon Juice)
1 Glass Old Tom Gin (2 oz Junipero Gin and a dash simple)

Stir well and add cherry.

Skipped Cherry and am quite cheery about it.

An enjoyably odd cocktail. One of the better features of orange bitters I’ve tried.

On modern cocktail menus, you’ll often find this cocktail significantly reformulated. Moving it away from its roots as a true Cock-tail, and moving it towards a lemon and Maraschino heavy Aviation Cocktail variation. I have to admit I prefer the old-fashioned version.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Brooklyn Cocktail

Brooklyn Cocktail

1 Dash Amer Picon (1/2 barspoon Torani Amer)
1 Dash Maraschino (1/2 barspoon Luxardo Maraschino)
2/3 Canadian Club Whisky (1 1/2 oz 40 Creek Barrel Select)
1/3 French Vermouth (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

This seemed a bit flat as written. I’ve read that Torani Amer is closer to Amer Picon with the addition of some Orange Bitters. A couple drops of Regan’s Orange Bitters did perk it up a bit. A squeeze of lemon peel and it really started to sing.

Ahem, of course it might be a bit tastier with, say, Sazerac Straight Rye Whiskey or Rittenhouse 100. But, out of deference to the Savoy, I stuck with Canadian.

By the way, tonight’s the night for Alembic Bar‘s monthly Savoy Cocktail Book night. Tonight the bartenders will forgo their usual menu and instead do their best to make any cocktail you desire from the Savoy Cocktail Book. The Brooklyn is a certainly a fine cocktail to ask for!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Blue Devil Cocktail

Blue Devil Cocktail

/2 Dry Gin (1 1/2 oz Boodles Gin)
1/4 Lemon Juice or Lime Juice (3/4 oz lemon Juice)
1/4 Maraschino (3/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
1 Dash Blue Vegetable Extract (1 Drop Blue Food Coloring)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

First, the Blue Devil does have a great name.

However, I can’t quite figure it out. It falls somewhere between the quite tart Savoy Aviation Cocktail and the pretty sweet Allen (Special) Cocktail. Well, and it is blue. For whatever reason, I preferred both the Allen and the Aviation. Variety of Gin? Color? Ratio? Can’t quite place why.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Aviation Cocktail

Aviation Cocktail

1/3 Lemon Juice. (3/4 oz Fresh Lemon Juice)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)
2 Dashes Maraschino. (1/2 tsp. Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur)
[2 Dashes Creme de Violette] (1/2 tsp. Rothman and Winter Creme de Violette Liqueur)
(1/2 teaspoon Rich Simple Syrup)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Garnish with cherry.)

In one of the Savoy Cocktail Book’s more famous typos or mistakes, Craddock (or the editors) left the Violette out of the recipe for the Aviation Cocktail.

This is the earliest recipe from Hugo Ensslin’s 1916 “Recipes for Mixed Drinks.”

Aviation Cocktail

1/3 Lemon Juice
2/3 El Bart Gin
2 dashes Maraschino
2 dashes Creme de Violette

Shake well in a mixing glass with cracked ice, strain and serve.

The Savoy and Ensslin Aviations are a pretty sharp tonics. Very sour with only those few little dashes of sweetener.

Generally, if you order an Aviation in a bar today, you’re more likely going to get something like this recipe from Gary Regan:

Aviation Cocktail

2 ounces gin
1/2 ounce maraschino liqueur
1/2 ounce fresh lemon juice

INSTRUCTIONS:

Fill a cocktail shaker two-thirds full with ice and add all of the ingredients. Shake for approximately 15 seconds. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

Like Embury’s Apple Jack Rabbit Cocktail, this is getting a bit far from the original recipe for me. Depending on the Maraschino you’re using, this may also really be overkill on that ingredient. Especially if you’re using Luxardo, too much Maraschino is not a good thing. It will completely dominate a cocktail in a not very pleasant manner.

So I propose the solution above. Don’t skip the violette, don’t overdo the Maraschino, and add a bit of simple syrup to mellow this very tart Savoy Cocktail Book recipe.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Allen (Special) Cocktail

Allen (Special) Cocktail

Dash Lemon Juice. (Juice 1/6 Lemon)
1/3 Maraschino. (3/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
2/3 Plymouth Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass (and garnish with a cherry).

First, let’s not confuse the bright red Maraschino Cherries you get in Shirley Temples with Maraschino Liqueur. You should not make this cocktail by dumping the syrup from your cherries in the shaker.

You’re going to have to hunt down some real Maraschino Liqueur before attempting this or an Aviation.

Maraschino Liqueur is made from cherries; but, somewhat indirectly.

The nice folks at Luxardo, (Maraska and Stock also make Maraschino liqueurs,) make a whole fruit Maraska Cherry Eau-de-Vie, age it briefly in Ash wood barrels, sweeten it, and then bottle it.

This is somewhat unusual, as most liqueurs are made by simply soaking fruit in alcohol and then filtering and bottling.

What you get from this process is an interesting and distinctive funky flavor. The use of the whole fruit including pits, definitely contributes some nutty almond-like notes.

Second, if you’re familiar with classic cocktails, you’ll note a striking similarity between this cocktail and the Aviation Cocktail. In fact, the only real difference between many formulations of the Allen and Aviation is the reversed proportions. The Aviation is 2/3 Gin and 1/3 Lemon Juice with a dash of Maraschino (and a dash of Violet Liqueur.) The Allen is 2/3 Gin and 1/3 Maraschino with a dash of lemon juice. This might seem a bit twiddly to us today, but, this sort of thing seems to have made a big difference to the drinkers of the early 20th Century.

In fact, I’d go on to say, that about 90% of the time when you order an Aviation in a modern bar, you’ll get something closer to an Allen than an Aviation.

In any case, the Allen cocktail is an enjoyable cocktail, and a fine feature for the Maraschino Liqueur.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Albertine Cocktail

In older cocktail books there are many cocktails for 4-6 people.

I guess these are intended for dinner parties and the like.

In “The Savoy Cocktail Book” these are almost always measured using the “glass” measure. In the parlance of late 19th and early 20th century cocktail bar the “glass” or “wineglass” amounted to approximately 2 ounces.

So, if Mrs. Underhill is interested, I’ll just use the number of “glasses” as ounces, effectively cutting the recipe in half, making 3 small or two medium drinks.

If my wife isn’t interested, I’ll half it again, and turn it into a “large” single serving. But, really, again the drinks back then were not very large.

This one is especially illustrative as the math is easy.

You’ve got 6 glasses or 12 oz of total liquid. That’s a 2 oz cocktail per person before dilution.

After shaking or stirring with ice, it is probably 2 1/2 or 3 oz per person. Not a large drink at all.


Albertine Cocktail
(Six People)

2 glasses Kirsch (1 oz Trimbach kirsch)
2 glasses Cointreau (1 oz Cointreau)
2 glasses Chartreuse (1 oz Yellow Chartreuse)
A few drops Maraschino

Shake (Stir please – eje) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I think the size is about right for 2 as an after dinner cocktail. Complex and more palatable than I imagined, given the amount of liqueur. Still, very sweet! I found it much improved with a squeeze of orange peel over the top.

I couldn’t really find a definitive answer in regards to the type of Chartreuse in this cocktail, yellow or green. I found different recipes calling for either one. Another contemporary guide with “The Savoy Cocktail Book,” Patrick Gavin Duffy’s “Official Mixer’s Manual” calls for yellow, so I went with that. Green Chartreuse would be interesting; but, as it is even higher proof than the yellow, it would put this cocktail in the dangerous to consume range.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Daiquiris, A Cautionary Tale

“The moment, now, had arrived for a Daiquiri: seated near the cool drip of the fountain, where a slight stir of air seemed to ruffle the fringed mantone of a bronze dancing Andalusian girl, I lingered over the frigid mixture of Ron Bacardi, sugar, and a fresh vivid green lime.

“It was a delicate compound, not so good as I was to discover later at the Telegrafo, but still a revelation, and I was devoutly thankful to be sitting, at that hour in the Inglaterra, with such a drink. It elevated my contentment to an even higher pitch ; and, with a detached amusement, I recalled the fact that farther north prohibition was formally in effect. Unquestionably the cocktail on my table was a dangerous agent, for it held, in its shallow glass bowl slightly encrusted with undissolved sugar, the power of a contemptuous indiffernce to fate ; it set the mind free of responsibility; obliterating both memory and tomorrow, it gave the heart an adventitious feeling of superiority and momentarily vanquished all the celebrated, the eternal, fears.

“Yes, that was the danger of skilfully prepared, intoxicating drinks. . . . The word intoxicating adequately expressed their power, their menace to orderly monotonous resignation. A word, I thought further, debased by moralists from its primary ecstatic content. Intoxication with Ron Bacardi, with May, with passion, was a state threatening to privilege, abhorrent to authority. And, since the dull were so fatally in the majority, they had succeeded in attaching a heavy penalty to whatever lay outside their lymphatic understanding. They had, as well, made the term gay an accusation before their Lord, confounding it with loose, so that now a gay girl certainly the only girl worth a ribbon or the last devotion was one bearing upon her graceful figure, for she was apt to be reprehensibly graceful, the censure of a society open to any charge other than that of gaiety in either of its meanings. A ridiculous, a tragic, conclusion, I told myself indifferently: but then, with a fresh Daiquiri and a sprig of orange blossoms in my buttonhole, it meant less than nothing.”

A short extract from Joseph Hergesheimer’s 1920 book, “San Cristobal de la Habana.”

For me, it is tough to improve on that, other than just giving a recipe for a Daiquiri.

The traditional Daiquiri recipe is as follows:

The Juice of 1/2 lime
1 Teaspoonful of castor or superfine sugar
2 oz Bacardi Rum (Ideally Havana Club Añejo Blanco. However, given the current US embargo of Cuban products, another Cuban-Style Rum like Flor de Cana Extra Dry, Appleton White, or Matusalem Platino, will likely have to do.)

Juice lime into mixing glass. Drop spent lime shell into mixing glass. Measure sugar and rum. Add ice, cap your shaker and shake until the outside of the shaker frosts. Strain into cocktail glass.

According to Wayne Curtis, in his informative and entertaining book, “And A Bottle of Rum,” Ernest Hemingway visited “El Floridita” in Cuba. When he saw Constantino Ribalaigua Vert making Daiquris he asked to taste one. He then said, “That’s good, but I prefer it without sugar and double rum.” This version became known as the “Papa Double.” Later in life, it is said Hemingway became fond of another version with a splash of grapefruit juice and a dash of Maraschino Liqueur. This is sometimes called the “Hemingway Special.”

We’ll try that.

Hemingway Special

2 oz Flor de Cana Extra Dry Rum
Juice 1/2 Lime
1/2 oz Grapefruit Juice
1/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur

Shake well and strain into a cocktail glass.

A portion of a track from David Torn’s excellent new ECM recording “Prezens” accompanies the cocktail making today.

This ended up a tad on the tart side for me. However, I think it has plenty of Maraschino, so perhaps, if you don’t like tart cocktails, add a half teaspoon of simple syrup or Caster Sugar.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.