Ideal Cocktail

Ideal Cocktail

Ideal Cocktail

3 Dashes Maraschino. (1 tsp. Luxardo Maraschino)
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Aviation Gin)
1 Tablespoonful Grapefruit Juice. (1 TBSP Fresh Ruby Grapefruit Juice)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Grapefruit Peel.) Serve with a small nut.

This is actually rather unexpectedly good! I dunno if I would quite rate it as “Ideal”, but certainly above average.

The Aviation Gin, is, of course, a non-traditional choice. Just seemed like it would be an OK in this drink, and, indeed it was.

I did add a quarter of a pickled walnut after I took the picture. Not bad, but it was kind of distracting, blowing away the rest of the drink flavors. I’d recommend sticking with the Grapefruit Peel alone unless you’re a real fan of pickled nuts.

This was a really neat color which the picture doesn’t quite capture. Kind of a glowy pink-ish tan.

I know I’m kind of going against the grain by stirring this drink which has fruit juice in it. But, it has such a small amount of juice and it has vermouth… Just seemed like a stirry kind of drink. Can’t wait to see what kind of controversy I generate by stirring the Income Tax in a couple days…

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Honolulu Cocktail (No 2)

Honolulu Cocktail (No. 2)

1/3 Maraschino. (3/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
1/3 Gin. (3/4 oz Tanqueray)
1/3 Benedictine. (3/4 oz Benedictine)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I suppose that is what it should be.

I just couldn’t quite face that cocktail. Thinking about the Maraschino and Benedictine, Oude Genever occurred to me.

Oude Genever

Yes, indeed that seems like a good idea!

Honolulu Cocktail No2

Honolulu Cocktail (No. 2)

1/3 Maraschino. (1/2 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
1/3 Gin. (1 oz Van Wees Oude Genever)
1/3 Benedictine. (1/2 oz Benedictine)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Lemon Peel.)

Tweaked the proportions slightly, but didn’t want to just turn it into an Improved Holland Gin Cocktail. Still quite sweet, but really, really tasty. 1 1/2 oz Oude Genever, 1/4 oz Luxardo, 1/4 oz Benedictine, maybe some bitters, and this would rock. Probably have to think up a different name… Kailua Cocktail? Diamond Head Cocktail? Why is this a Hawaii themed Cocktail name anyway? I could see No. 1 being Hawaii-esque, since it had Pineapple juice. But Gin, Maraschino, and Benedictine?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Holland House Cocktail

The Holland House Cocktail we made at Beretta was pretty lackluster.

Holland House Cocktail

The Juice of 1/4 Lemon.
1 Slice Pineapple. (handful sliced pineapple pieces)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 Vya Dry Vermouth)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)
4 Dashes Maraschino. (barspoon Luxardo Maraschino)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

However, more recent information suggests that it was not, originally, a “London Dry Gin” Cocktail, but instead, a Holland Gin Cocktail.

Indeed, in conjunction with the launch of their new reformulation of Holland Gin, Bols has been pimping a version of the Holland House Cocktail to bartenders and cocktail fanatics far and wide.

Holland House Cocktail
1 3/4 Shot Bols Genever
3/4 Shot Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth
1/2 Shot Lemon Juice
1/4 Shot Maraschino Liqueur

Shake well and strain into a cocktail glass. Lemon Peel.

Aside from the inexplicable use of “shot” as a measure, having sampled this at a recent Bols event, I can say that it is a significant improvement over the same cocktail with Dry Gin. Even flirting, as it does, with things which really shouldn’t go together. Genever and Dry Vermouth not to mention Dry Vermouth and Lemon Juice.

I really don’t know how to read “shot” notation, so I just pretended they were ounces and went with the home town team for the gin.

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Holland House Cocktail

1 3/4 oz Anchor Genevieve Gin
3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth
1/2 oz Lemon Juice
1/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur

Shake well and strain into a cocktail glass. Lemon Peel.

The Anchor Gin does truly dominate this cocktail, but using a Genenver style Gin takes the Holland House from a puzzling waste of booze to a pretty interesting combination of flavors.

Fantasio Cocktail (No. 1 and No. 2)

Fantasio Cocktail (No. 1)

1/6 White Crème de Menthe.
1/6 Maraschino.
1/3 Brandy.
1/3 Dry Gin.

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.

Fantasio Cocktail. (No. 2.)

1/6 White Crème de Menthe. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Creme de Menthe)
1/6 Maraschino. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Maraschino)
1/3 Brandy. (3/4 oz Brandy)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I’ve stared and stared at these two Savoy Cocktail Book recipes for Fantasio No. 1 and No. 2 and can find no difference between them, aside from the shaking detail. In the 1934 edition of Patrick Gavin Duffy’s “Official Mixer’s Manual” they are actually both stirred, but the No. 2 gets a cherry. God knows why there are two versions of this cocktail in either book.

Gin and Brandy isn’t one of those things that really pops into my head as a great combination, so I thought about this one for a while, comparing the gins I had in the house. Eventually, I decided to go with a Jonge Genever. It seemed like the slight maltiness would complement the brandy well.

I also nominally cheated on the recipe ratio. Just couldn’t quite face that much liqueur.

Fantasio, slight variation

1/4 oz Brizard White Crème de Menthe
1/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino
3/4 oz Cerbois VSOP Armagnac
1 oz Boomsma Jonge Genever

Stir, strain, cherry.

Maybe I’m on crack, but this isn’t half bad. Sort of a more complex Stinger. The cherry is a nice touch and I like the flavors it brings towards the end of the cocktail after soaking in the booze.

…Some time later…

Well, this is rather embarrassing.

While the Fantasios in the Savoy Cocktail Book are exactly the same, (excepting the stirring/shaking detail,) I was looking through 1934 Patrick Gavin Duffy for the umpteenth time, and noticed the two Fantasios are slightly different:

Fantasio Cocktail No. 1
1/6 White Creme de Menthe (1/2 of 3/4 oz Brizard Creme de Menthe)
1/6 Maraschino (1/2 of 3/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
1/3 Brandy (3/4 oz Señor Lustau Solera Reserva Brandy de Jerez)
1/3 French Vermouth (3/4 oz French Vermouth)
Stir well and strain.
Use glass Number 1.

Fantasio Cocktail No. 2
1/6 White Creme de Menthe
1/6 Maraschino
1/3 Brandy
1/3 Italian Vermouth
Stir well in ice and strain. Add a cherry.
Use glass number 1.

Uh, oops! I’ve no explanation for completely missing the fact that he calls for vermouth instead of Gin. I guess sometimes you see what you want to see!?

So that makes it more of a Brandy Manhattan variation, than a, well, whatever the hell the Savoy Brandy and Gin concoction is.

But the big question, is it any better with vermouth?  I tried No 1 exactly as written and unfortunately my answer is, “No, not really.”  Still disgustingly sweet.

However, again, something like this ain’t bad:

2/3 Brandy (1 1/2 oz Señor Lustau Solera Reserva Brandy de Jerez)
1/3 Sweet Vermouth (3/4 oz Carpano Antica)
1 tsp Creme de Menthe
1 tsp Maraschino Liqueur

Stir with ice and strain into a cocktail glass. Add a cherry (preferably Luxardo or Toschi).

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Diplomat Cocktail

Diplomat Cocktail

1 Dash Maraschino. (Luxardo)
2/3 French Vermouth. (Noilly Prat)
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (Punt e Mes)
(Splash Wild Turkey Rye Whiskey)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Build over ice, stir to chill.) Add cherry and squeeze lemon peel on top.

As usual, going with the build over cracked ice method for these vermouth heavy cocktails.

I guess, diplomats would have to keep their cool. Not drink too much strong “likker”.

Fortunately I do not have the weight of the world weighing down upon my shoulders, and can feel free to add a splash of Rye Whiskey to this. Significantly improved my diplomatic relations with the world and the cocktail, I must say.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Coronation Cocktail (No. 1)

Coronation Cocktail (No. 1)

Coronation Cocktail (No. 1)

1/2 Sherry. (1 1/2 oz Domecq La Ina Fino Sherry)
1/2 French Vermouth. (1 1/2 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)
1 Dash Maraschino. (Luxardo)
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (1 dash Regan’s, 1 dash Fee’s)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Again, prefer to build these sorts of things over rocks, so there you go.

This was really nice. I think I am coming around to dry sherry.

Earlier in the evening, I had been experimenting with Aviation proportions and different violet liqueurs. Palate was pretty jaded from it all. This was a pleasant, simple, relief from all that perfumed nonsense.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Colonial Cocktail

Colonial Cocktail

Colonial Cocktail

2/3 Dry Gin. (2 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/3 Grape Fruit Juice. (1 oz fresh squeezed Grapefruit Juice)
3 Dashes Maraschino. (Luxardo)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

While I wouldn’t quite call this a “great” or “amazing” cocktail, it is pleasantly refreshing and enjoyable enough. I imagine it would be quite nice on a hot day. If we ever had any of those here in San Francisco.

One thing I noticed was that this flavor combination really highlighted the nutty flavor aspects of the Luxardo Maraschino.

Not too far from the Daiquiri variant reputedly enjoyed by Hemingway, eh?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Classic Cocktail

Classic Cocktail

Classic Cocktail

1/6 Lemon Juice (1/2 oz lemon juice)
1/6 Curacao (1/2 oz Brizard Curacao)
1/6 Maraschino (1/2 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
1/2 Brandy (1 1/2 oz Pierre Ferrand Ambre)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. Frost rim of glass with castor sugar. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

I left off the sugar rim, as it seemed like this cocktail was plenty sweet already.

Sort of an interesting half way point between the Brandy Crusta and the Sidecar, no?

I do kind of wonder if bartenders getting this cocktail mixed up with the Sidecar, is how that cocktail ended up with a sugared rim.

Anyway, quite tasty. Could be a little more tart for my tastes, I suppose.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Chocolate Cocktail (No 1)

Chocolate Cocktail (No 1)

Chocolate Cocktail (No. 1)

1 Teaspoonful of Powdered Chocolate (heaping teaspoon of Scharffen Berger cocoa powder)
1 Egg
1 Liqueur Glass Maraschino (1 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
1 Liqueur Glass Yellow Chartreuse (1 oz Yellow Chartreuse)
(dash Pierre Ferrand Cognac)

Shake well and strain into large glass.

Now, I’m not sure if “Chocolate Powder” means something other than cocoa powder; but, if you’re going to use Cocoa Powder, it’s going to be a bit more complicated than the above instructions, unless you want a lumpy mess.

Extra equipment: 2 small bowls, rubber spatula, and a whisk or fork.

(Method: Dump a generous teaspoon of unsweetened Cocoa Power into one of your bowls. Add a teaspoon of water and mix until it starts to form a paste. Add a little more water at a time and continue mixing until it reaches the consistency of melted chocolate. Whisk up your egg in the other bowl and pour it into chocolate. Whisk together. Measure the liqueurs into your mixing tin or glass. Pour in the egg and chocolate mixture. Add ice and shake well. Strain into cocktail glass.)

Like the Cafe Kirsch Cocktail, I had no real hope that I would enjoy this. And like the Cafe Kirsch, I found it a really tasty cocktail. The Yellow Chartreuse and Maraschino combine in really interesting ways with the cocoa. Mrs. Underhill even enjoyed it.

The two ounces of liqueur might seemed like a lot. However, using unsweetened cocoa powder, that’s about what you’re going to need to balance the bitterness of the chocolate. It seemed on par or less sweet than most hot cocoa or cold chocolate drinks.

If you have a choc-a-holic friend, this might be a nice change for them from the usual “chocotini”.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Chinese Cocktail

Chinese Cocktail

Chinese Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters
3 Dashes Maraschino (1/2 bar spoon Luxardo Maraschino)
3 Dashes Curacao (1/2 bar spoon Senior Curacao of Curacao)
1/3 Grenadine (1, well 3/4, oz Home Made Grenadine)
2/3 Jamaica Rum (2 oz Appleton Estate V/X Rum)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

No idea why this is called the “Chinese Cocktail”. From the ingredients, it seems like the recipe must be old. Say, pre-1900. I know there was a “Japanese” cocktail in one of the versions of Jerry Thomas’ cocktail book.

The flavors combination is actually very good; but, the cocktail is rather too sweet, even with home made grenadine. I think changing it to 3/4 rum, 1/4 grenadine, and being a bit more generous with the bitters, would be closer to my taste.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.