Opera Cocktail

Opera Cocktail

Opera Cocktail.

1/6 Maraschino. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
1/6 Dubonnet. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Dubonnet Rouge)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Beefeater 24)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze orange peel on top.

This version of the Opera is too sweet for me. Tastes like perfumey, wine candy. My first instinct was to increase the Dubonnet Rouge to 3/4 oz and reduce the Maraschino to a bar spoon. That version lacked zest. I think somewhere around a quarter ounce of Maraschino would be about right. A dash or two of Angostura bitters wouldn’t hurt, either.

Beefeater 24

Received the Beefeater 24 from the folks promoting its launch in the US. Nice bottle, eh? It’s a pleasant gin, a bit more citrus forward than the regular Beefeater and perhaps a bit sweeter. I don’t get much flavor from the much ballyhooed inclusion of Japanese Green Tea. Perhaps the subtle character of green tea would show up in a simpler drink.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Morning Cocktail

Morning Cocktail

Morning Cocktail

2 Dashes Curacao. (2/3 tsp Bols Dry Orange Curacao)
2 Dashes Maraschino. (2/3 tsp Luxardo Maraschino)
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (2 dashes Angostura Orange Bitters)
2 Dashes Absinthe. (1/2 tsp Sirene Absinthe Verte)
1/2 Brandy. (1 oz Lustau Reserve Brandy)
1/2 French Vermouth. (1 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)

Shake (well, if you really want to shake, shake. Recommend stirring, myself.) well and strain into cocktail glass. Add a (Mmmm… Luxardo) cherry and squeeze lemon peel on top.

This recipe is verbatim from Harry McElhone’s “Barflies and Cocktails” (and more likely “Harry’s ABCs”). McElhone credits the recipe to “Harry Johnson of New Orleans”. And indeed, it is to be found in the 1900 edition of Harry Johnson’s “Bartenders’ Manual” (Handily published by Mud Puddle Books: “Bartender’s Manual”.)

The only difference between Mr. McElhone’s and Mr. Johnson’s recipes is that Mr. McElhone calls for the Orange Bitters and Mr. Johnson calls for “3 or 4 dashes of bitters (Boker’s Genuine Only)”. Well, times change, and Boker’s Bitters probably weren’t available in London or Paris.

The recipe is a bit twiddly, with all the dashes of this and that.

In addition, I’m growing dissatisfied with the Lustau Brandy. It just doesn’t have much presence in a drink or much length or depth on its own.

Despite that, I found the Morning Cocktail genuinely enjoyable. I was really surprised how dominant the citrus flavors of the cocktail were. There’s some sort of interesting interaction going on between the Dry Vermouth, Curacao, and Lemon Twist.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Moonshine Cocktail

Moonshine Cocktail

Moonshine Cocktail
(6 People)

3 Glasses Gin. (1 1/2 oz Martin Miller’s Gin)
2 Glasses French Vermouth. (1 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1 Glass Maraschino. (1 barspoon Luxardo Maraschino)

Before shaking add a drop of Absinthe Bitters (Gin and Wormwood). (Add an Olive.)

OK, I cheated slightly on the Maraschino amount. It should have been 1/2 oz, not a barspoon. Just seemed like it would be a bit much, and frankly, 1 teaspoon was plenty.

A fine, but not outstanding cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Mary Pickford Cocktail

Mary Pickford Cocktail

Mary Pickford Cocktail

1/2 Bacardi Rum. (1 oz Montecristo White Rum)
1/2 Pineapple Juice. (1 oz Knudsen Pineapple)
1 Teaspoonful Grenadine. (1 barspoon Homemade Grenadine)
6 Drops Maraschino. (6 drops Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur)

Oddly another Savoy Cocktail which lacks directions. I’m gonna say shake, because it is so much more fun to get that nice little head you get with shaking pineapple juice.

Way back when we talked about the Fairbanks cocktail we talked about the tension in the Fairbanks/Pickford house. Mary Pickford, “America’s Sweetheart”, enjoyed the odd drink. Douglas Fairbanks did not and did not approve of her drinking.

I don’t know who could argue with a fine, light, and enjoyable drink like this. I doubt even Fairbanks would notice it was alcoholic!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Martinez Cocktail

Hayman's Old Tom

Called my local liquor store a while ago and asked them if they were going to carry the Hayman’s Old Tom Gin. Usually, they’re on top of this sort of thing, so I was a bit surprised when the response was, “Hayman’s? I haven’t heard of that.” Fortunately, a quick call to the distributor revealed that the gin was already in Southern California and would be shipped North soon.
Martinez Cocktail
(6 People)

Pour into the shaker 3 glasses of Gin, 3 of French Vermouth, add a dessertspoonful of Orange Bitters and 2 of Curacao or Maraschino. Shake and serve with a cherry and a piece of lemon rind.

I suspect Craddock gets the idiotic idea of using French Vermouth in a Martinez from Robert Vermeire, who espouses this formulation in his book, “Cocktails: How to Mix Them”. And I suppose it is perfectly fine drink, though Martinez, it is not.

Martinez Cocktail

Martinez Cocktail
(current Ellestad formulation)

1 1/2 oz Hayman’s Old Tom Gin
3/4 oz Carpano Antica Sweet Vermouth
Scant teaspoon Luxardo Maraschino
Dash Angostura Orange Bitters
Dash Angostura Bitters

Stir with ice to chill and strain into a cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel over glass. Add a (preferably luxardo or toschi) cherry if you so desire.

If you’re using a higher proof gin, you might want to up the amount of vermouth, but I find with Plymouth, or now Hayman’s, 2-1 is a good ratio. I also like to add a dash of angostura, as I find it tames some of the tropical marshmallow candy notes that show up when Carpano Antica is in close proximity to Luxardo Maraschino. As they say, your mileage may vary.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Lord Suffolk Cocktail

Lord Suffolk

Lord Suffolk Cocktail

1/8 Italian Vermouth. (1/4 oz Carpano Antica)
1/8 Cointreau. (1/4 oz Cointreau)
5/8 Gin. (1 1/4 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/8 Maraschino. (1/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Lemon peel.)

Whichever Lord of Suffolk this cocktail refers to, he certainly had a sweet tooth!

It’s actually a pretty tasty cocktail with the funk of the Maraschino out front, just really, really sweet.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Leave It To Me Cocktail (No. 2)

Leave It To Me No 2

Leave It To Me Cocktail (No. 2)

1 Teaspoonful Raspberry Syrup. (1 teaspoon Monin Raspberry Syrup)
1 Teaspoonful Lemon Juice.
1 Dash Maraschino. (1/3 tsp. Luxardo Maraschino)
3/4 Glass Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Now, we’re talking.

This is a lovely cocktail, which definitely could use some revivification.

Admittedly a bit girly, being slightly pink and a bit fruity. Still it’s not pink enough to cause alarm and with enough of a gin punch that I think any male secure in his manhood should have no problem with it.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Lawhill Cocktail

Lawhill Cocktail

Lawhill Cocktail

1 Dash Absinthe. (1/3 tsp. Marteau Verte Classique)
1 Dash Maraschino. (1/3 tsp. Luxardo Maraschino)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
2/3 Canadian Club Whisky. (1 1/4 oz 40 Creek Barrel Select, 1/4 oz Buffalo Trace Bourbon)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Lemon Peel.)

I liked this a lot, but I can say with confidence that I would have liked it even more with Sweet Vermouth instead of dry. Even just a dash of Sweet Vermouth. Of course, then it would just be an old-school Canadian Whisky Manhattan.

I’m told that Scotsman Harry McElhone published this cocktail in one of his early books. Law is apparently Scots for “Hill”. The Law in Dundee Scotland is sometimes called “Law Hill” even though that actually means, “Hill Hill.”

At a height of over 500 feet above sea level, Dundee Law provides a popular, easily accessed vantage point placed high above the centre of Dundee, Scotland’s fourth largest city.  This long-since extinct volcano is featured on the local Dundee City Council logo (below) and its great height dominates the surrounding area, and can be seen from very many miles away. There is a viewpoint where visitors can scan the view and be informed of the many worthwhile scenes to be had, from the Grampian Mountains to the North and as far as the Southern Uplands of Lothian, south of Edinburgh.  Across the Firth of Tay can be seen the ‘Kingdom’ of Fife, travelling north across the Tay Road Bridge from where, the Law can be seen in full majesty. The famous Tay Rail Bridge can also be seen curving its way across the River Tay taking trains to Edinburgh and London.  Numerous other landmarks can be seen.

Also, there was a well known ship called the “Lawhill“.

Lawhill was built at the Caledon Shipbuilding & Engineering Company yard of W. B. Thompson in Dundee, Scotland, and launched on 24 August 1892. Named after the Law, a hill in the middle of Dundee, Lawhill had been ordered by shipowner Charles Barrie for the jute trade, but only made two voyages carrying jute before the business became unprofitable, and shifted to other cargoes.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Irish Cocktail

Irish Cocktail

Irish Cocktail

2 Dashes Absinthe. (2/3 tsp. Marteau Verte Classique Absinthe)
2 Dashes Curacao. (2/3 tsp. Luxardo Triplum)
1 Dash Maraschino. (1/3 tsp. Luxardo Maraschino)
1 dash Angostura Bitters.
1/2 Glass Irish Whisky. (1 oz Redbreast Irish Whiskey)

Shake well (stir, please) and strain into cocktail glass. Add olive and squeeze orange peel on top.

I was very tempted to double the whiskey in this one, but I restrained myself, and put it in my tiniest glass.

Pretty much an “Improved Irish Whiskey Cocktail”. To me, the portion of Absinthe seems a bit large for the small amount of Whiskey in this particular cocktail. Washing the glass with, or a single dash of, Absinthe would probably be plenty. And at that point, you’d have a very tasty cocktail indeed.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Imperial Cocktail

Imperial Cocktail

Imperial Cocktail

1 Dash Maraschino. (1/3 tsp. Luxardo Maraschino)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1/2 French Vermouth. (1 1/2 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Junipero Vermouth)

Stir well and serve with olive.

Another cool and tasty Dry Martini variation. Yum!

Kind of a Dry Vermouth version of the Martinez. Who can complain about that?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.