Old Etonian Cocktail

Old Etonian Cocktail

Old Etonian Cocktail

2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (Angostura Bitters)
2 Dashes Crème de Noyau. (2/3 barspoon Rowley Noyau)
1/2 London Gin. (1 1/2 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 11)
1/2 Kina Lillet. (1 1/2 oz Homemade Lillet Clone)

Shake will and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze orange peel on top.

Lot of homemade shit in this one, eh?

Homemade Noyah

Now you know when you get liqueur in a bottle as confidence inspiring as the above, you are in for a treat.

Matt Rowley, being the fearless man that he is, made a batch of Noyau earlier this year: If I had a Hammer. The minute after I read his post, I had an email out to Rowley asking if he was interested in a trade of Noyau for Nocino. He was amenable and soon a bottle of Noyau appeared in the mail.

Zyklon B or no, it is tasty stuff. If you don’t have an enterprising friend like Rowley, the usual substitution of Amaretto will likely be fine.

The cocktail is one of the more pleasing in recent memory. The bitter almond and cherry-like flavor of the Noyau combines quite well with the slightly sweet oranginess of the Kina Lillet Clone. I can only imagine it would be tastier with Cocchi Americano.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Martini Sweet Cocktail

Martini Sweet Cocktail

Martini (Sweet) Cocktail

1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica)
2/3 London Gin. (1 1/2 oz Junipero Gin)
(Dash Angostura Orange Bitters)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Lemon Twist.)

It’s funny, when you get to cocktails as iconic as the Martini, it really is kind of hard to think of anything new to say.

David Wondrich has tackled it exhaustively in “Imbibe!“. There are numerous whole books on the subject from Authors as diverse as Gary Regan and Barnaby Conrad, III.

What else is there to say about drinks this which are this ubiquitous?

We’ll probably never know who created it and where. The first version was likely one with Sweet Vermouth and Old-Tom Gin. Personally, I don’t think the bitters are optional in a Martini. Without them, it is, apparently, a Lone Tree.

Maybe you’ve been putting off a Martinez or Martini with Sweet Vermouth?

You know, it was funny, when I was on the Manhattan, I told my Mom about it and her comment was, “Oh, I don’t like cocktails which are that sweet.” This from a woman who drinks Peppermint Patties!

Really, this isn’t that sweet a drink, despite the fact that it contains “Sweet” vermouth. Buy yourself a fresh bottle of Sweet Vermouth, a decent gin, don’t skip the bitters, and give it a try. You might be pleasantly surprised.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.