C.F.H. Cocktail

C.F.H. Cocktail

C.F.H. Cocktail

1/6 Grenadine (1/2 oz homemade)
1/6 Cederlund’s Swedish Punch (1/2 oz Facile Swedish Punch)
1/6 Calvados (1/2 oz Laird’s Bonded Apple Brandy)
1/6 Lemon Juice (1/2 oz fresh lemon juice)
1/3 Burrough’s Beefeater Gin (1 oz Boodle’s Gin)

(Shake and strain into cocktail glass)

Oddly, this recipe has no method instructions and I couldn’t dig up anything on the name.

Anyway, it’s really quite tasty. A sort of more sophisticated Jack Rose.

Really enjoyed the interplay of the spice elements of the gin and Swedish Punsch with the Apple Brandy and Lemon.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Cat’s Eye Cocktail

Cat's Eye Cocktail

Cats-Eye Cocktail (6 people)

1/2 Glass Fresh Lemonade (1/4 oz Lemon Juice, 1/2 teaspoon sugar)
1/2 Glass Water (1/4 oz water)
2 Glasses Gin (1 oz Boodles Gin)
1 Dessertspoonful Kirsch (Dash Trimbach Kirsch)
1/2 Glass Cointreau (1/4 oz Cointreau)
Not quite 2 Glasses French Vermouth (Not quite 1 oz Noilly Prat Dry)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glasses. Serve with an olive.

Skipped the olive.

A tasty cocktail. A bit like an Aviation crossed with a Martini. Certainly something worthwhile to try, if you enjoy those sorts of sweet tart flavors.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Casino Cocktail

Casino Cocktail

Casino Cocktail

2 Dashes Maraschino (2/3 tsp Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur)
2 Dashes Orange Bitters (generous couple splashes Regan’s Orange Bitters)
2 Dashes Lemon Juice (2/3 tsp Lemon Juice)
1 Glass Old Tom Gin (2 oz Junipero Gin and a dash simple)

Stir well and add cherry.

Skipped Cherry and am quite cheery about it.

An enjoyably odd cocktail. One of the better features of orange bitters I’ve tried.

On modern cocktail menus, you’ll often find this cocktail significantly reformulated. Moving it away from its roots as a true Cock-tail, and moving it towards a lemon and Maraschino heavy Aviation Cocktail variation. I have to admit I prefer the old-fashioned version.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Canadian Cocktail

Canadian Cocktail

Canadian Cocktail

The Juice of 1/4 Lemon
1/4 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar (no thanks, sweet enough already)
1 Liqueur Glass Curacao (about 1 1/4 oz Senior Curacao of Curacao)
3 Dashes Jamaica Rum (1/4 oz Inner Circle Green)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

The big question here was what rum to use.

I knew it had to be something with enough oomph that it would be noticed in a very small amount. I’ve also read that Canadians and Newfundlanders allegedly enjoy that “Screech” sort of thing. I singed my nose hairs on a few of the usual suspects. Pusser’s, Lemon Hart 151, and the Inner Circle Green. Kind of wish I had some Wray and Nephew white in the house. But, anyway, ended up with the Inner Circle Green. It seemed to have the most interesting funk of the bunch.

Cocktail is alright. Making as I did, it’s really pretty close in sweetness to many of the cocktails served in the mainstream American bars. If I were to make it again, it would be more to my taste as: 1/2 oz Curacao, 3/4 oz Cuban style rum, 1/4 oz overproof rum, juice 1/4 lemon.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Calvados Cocktail Variation

Calvados Cocktail Special

Calvados Cocktail

Variation of the above.

3 Glasses Calvados (2 oz Laird’s Bonded Apple Brandy)
3 Glasses Sweetened Lemon Juice (Juice 1/2 Lemon)
(1 teaspoon Caster Sugar)

Shake very Thoroughly and serve.

Since this was just an Apple Brandy Sour, I didn’t feel quite justified in using the Germain-Robin Apple Brandy in it.

Perfectly tasty Apple Brandy Sour, and quite refreshing.

Dunno why it is called a “variation on the above” or why it isn’t named simply “Calvados Sour”.

Let me know why you think this interpretation might be incorrect.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Cameron’s Kick Cocktail

Cameron's Kick Cocktail

Cameron’s Kick Cocktail

1/3 Scotch Whisky (1 oz Compass Box Asyla Scotch Whisky)
1/3 Irish Whiskey (1 oz Red Breast Irish Whiskey)
1/6 Lemon Juice (1/2 oz fresh)
1/6 Orgeat Syrup (1/2 oz Monin Orgeat)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Squeeze orange peel on top.)

I can’t really think of a funnier or wittier way to put this than Paul Clarke did in his Cocktail Chronicle blog a year or so ago, so I’ll just include a quote:

Cameron’s Kick

Remember the old saw about how, if you took a million monkeys and gave them each a typewriter, they’d eventually come up with the works of Shakespeare? Well edit “typewriter” to read “cocktail shaker,” and stick the monkeys in a well-stocked bar, and the banana-addled mixologists would come up with a Cameron’s Kick in about the same amount of time it’d take that set of simian scribes to work their way around to Titus Andronicus.

Like “Blood in the Sand” it’s another of those cocktails that didn’t really seem anywhere near likely enough that it would be tasty to work it’s way up the list.

Yet here it is, and I quite enjoyed it.

Sweet and tart. Puzzling and a bit exotic. Some elements of spice, and some elements of Scotch Whiskey.

It really doesn’t seem like it should work. But, it does.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Cablegram Cocktail

Cablegram Cocktail

Cablegram Cocktail

Juice of 1/2 Lemon
1/2 Tablespoon Powdered Sugar (1/2 teaspoon caster sugar)
1 Glass Canadian Club Whisky (2 oz Sazerac Straight Rye Whiskey)

Shake well, strain into long tumbler (1/3 filled with ice) and fill with Ginger Ale (Reed’s Ginger Brew).

Along with the Bull-Dog, another very good long drink featuring ginger ale. This one is a whisk(e)y sour plus ginger ale.

I felt like the ginger and lemon would need a whisk(e)y with a bit more spirit than Canadian, so I went with the younger Sazerac. Worked quite well.

The recipe in the Savoy doesn’t mention ice in the serving glass at all. However, every other recipe I read suggested building it over ice or straining it over fresh ice.

I dunno if the ginger ale in England was less sweet or if they just liked sweeter drinks; but, I’m not entirely convinced this needed any extra sugar at all. With the Reed’s, I think you could just build it in the glass with ice and leave out the extra sugar.

Googling this recently, I was pleasantly surprised to discover that they have re-vived the Cablegram at Vessel in Seattle. It was even referenced in some reviews of the venue as one of their more outstanding cocktails. Of course it involves house made ginger ale and such. Still, nice to see a bar bringing back obscure classic cocktails!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Brunelle Cocktail

Brunelle Cocktail

1/4 Absinthe (1/2 oz Verte de Fougerolles Absinthe)
1/2 Tablespoonful of Sugar (1 teaspoon caster sugar)
3/4 Lemon Juice (Juice 1/2 lemon)
(1 oz Boodles Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I normally don’t try to revise Savoy Cocktails too significantly. But, cocktails made with just Absinthe haven’t done much for me. Too rich. When I was thinking about it at lunch, I thought I would dilute it with vodka. But, then, after waiting an half an hour for a N Judah train to even show up and take me home, a mild gin like Boodles seemed like a much better way to reward myself. After it took an hour and a half to get home, my thoughts were more like, “Screw vodka and screw MUNI I’m having GIN.”

First I was quite pleased with myself, thinking it an original idea. Then, it seemed a bit familiar. Couple sips later, I remembered Le Demon Verte from “The Art of the Bar”.

OK, Le Demon Verte uses lime juice as sour and falernum as sweetener. Still, I have unthinkingly come pretty close to taking the long way around to rediscovering its DNA.

Tasty, though. I do believe I’ll have another.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.