Culross Cocktail

Culross Cocktail

The Culross Cocktail

The Juice of 1/4 Lemon.
1/3 Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Cocchi Americano)
1/3 Bacardi Rum. (3/4 oz Flor de Cana Extra-Dry)
1/3 Apricot Brandy. (3/4 oz Blume Marillen Apricot Eau-de-Vie)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Since the Americano is a bit sweet and there isn’t much lemon in this, I thought I might take a friend’s suggestion to heart and give this one a try with an Apricot Eau-de-Vie instead of Apricot liqueur.

Wow! Really tasty, and very interesting flavors. The cinnamon and spice of the Americano are quite nice in combination with the dark apricot flavor of the Blume Marillen. One of those cocktails that leaves me smelling the glass, intrigued.

I also tried it with apricot liqueur and modern Lillet. A lot less interesting. I suppose I should have gone on with the variations and tried Lillet/Eau-de-Vie and Americano/liqueur; but, the first one was so good, I really didn’t see the need.

If Apricot Eau-de-Vie and Americano is wrong, I don’t want to be right.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Cuban Cocktail (No. 1)

Cuban Cocktail (No. 1)

Cuban Cocktail (No. 1)

The Juice of 1/4 Lemon.
1 Teaspoonful Powdered Sugar. (1 scant teaspoon Caster Sugar)
1 Glass Bacardi Rum. (2 oz Matusalem Platino)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I’ve not really ever figured out exactly the best rum to substitute for pre-prohibition

I have been using Flor de Cana Extra Dry. A friend suggested Matusalem Platino as the closest rum to HC Anejo Blanco available in America.

Flavorwise, the Platino is a very, very light rum. It smells OK and tastes fine on its own; but, once you get it in a cocktail, it is pretty much gone. To me, for all I could detect of rum in this cocktail, I might as well have used vodka.

Anyway, not entirely thrilled with the Matusalem Platino, I sent a few notes around to a few experts asking what they thought about an appropriate substitution would be.

Mr. Jeff Berry responded thusly.

You are absolutely correct to sub Flor De Cana for contemporary Bacardi, especially in 1930s-era recipes! Today’s Bacardi white rum is total garbage — and Bacardi has been deliberately turning it into garbage over the years. Since the early 1960s they’ve been chasing the vodka market — “Bacardi, the mixable one” was their old ad line from back then — by taking all the rum flavor out of their white rum to make it as neutral and tasteless as vodka. This is especially heinous because their original white rum was glorious — I tasted some 1920s Bacardi white two years ago and it was a revelation: rich, floral, distinctive, “rummy.” Finally I understood why anyone ever bothered drinking traditional Daiquiris, which taste like nothing when made with today’s white rums…Havana Club’s white rum is good, if you can get it, but for my money Flor De Cana’s white comes closest to the body and bouquet of pre-WWII white rums.

Largely flavorless rum, or not, the Cuban Cocktail is enjoyable. With 2 oz of rum and less than an half ounce of lemon, it is quite dry. The scant teaspoon of caster sugar is the perfect amount, just sweetening the cocktail enough to temper the sourness of the lemon.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Crow Cocktail

Crow Cocktail

The Crow Cocktail

1/3 Whisky. (3/4 oz Whisky)
2/3 Lemon Juice. (1 1/2 oz Lemon Juice)
1 Dash Grenadine. (homemade)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Well, that is what it is supposed to be according to Harry Craddock. And, yep, that is undrinkable.

However, the Crow Cocktail turns out to be one of the more dramatic Savoy Cocktail Book typos.

The recipe comes from Judge Jr.’s 1927 book, “Here’s How,” and in that book is written as follows.

The Crow
2/3 Scotch; (1 1/2 oz Scotch)
1/3 lemon juice; (3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
a dash of grenadine.

That’s still pretty tart, depending on your generosity with the dash of grenadine, but it is, at least, not completely insane.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Corpse Reviver Cocktail (No. 2)

Corpse Reviver Cocktail (No. 2)

Corpse Reviver (No. 2)

1/4 Wine Glass Lemon Juice (3/4 oz Fresh Lemon Juice)
1/4 Wine Glass Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Cocchi Aperitivo Americano)
1/4 Wine Glass Cointreau. (3/4 oz Cointreau)
1/4 Wine Glass Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Bombay Gin)
1 Dash Absinthe. (Verte de Fougerolles)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Note: Four of these taken in swift succession will unrevive the corpse again.

Ahem, well, going by the rules of a “Wine Glass” equaling 2 oz, I should have used 1/2 oz portions. However, the previous evening’s celebrations had left this corpse badly in need of Revivifaction.

The Cocchi Aperitivo Americano is actually quite nice here, lending a bit more complexity than Lillet Blanc. So far I have yet to find a Savoy cocktail where I prefer using the modern Lillet to the Americano. On the other hand, the Cocchi Americano was downright horrible in The Pegu Club’s White Negroni, a cocktail obviously created with the character of the modern Lillet in mind.

Bombay Gin is another new player. I’ve been wanting to give the regular Bombay a try for a while now, and now that I finished off the Boodles, I picked up a bottle. A bit mild, but not bad at all.

Patrick Gavin Duffy has a slight variation on the Corpse Reviver No. 2 in his “Official Mixer’s Manual”, which is sometimes reproduced in modern cocktail collections. In it he substitutes Swedish Punsch for the Lillet.

Corpse Reviver Cocktail (No. 2)

1/4 Dry Gin (3/4 oz Bombay Dry Gin)
1/4 Cointreau (3/4 oz Cointreau)
1/4 Swedish Punch (3/4 oz Carlshamm’s Flaggpunsch)
1/4 Lemon Juice (3/4 oz fresh lemon juice)
1 Dash Pernod (Dash Verte de Fougerolles Absinthe)

Shake well with ice and strain into glass

This is tad bit sweeter than the Lillet based affair. The flavor of the Swedish Punsch really dominates the cocktail.

Both are really quite nice, mild cocktails. If I had to give either the nod, I’d say the Savoy no. 2 made with Cocchi Americano is slightly more well balanced. Though, recently a friend told me they had really been enjoying the Swedish Punsch version with the bottled Underhill Punch I made for Tales. Maybe I need to revisit this with the homemade.

Gotta give a shout out to friend Trott. When he mentioned last summer that he was going to visit family in Sweden, he did not balk when I said, “Your mission, should you choose to accept: Bring back Swedish Punsch.” And he did! Well, it turned out not to be that hard, as his family there made a habit of consuming it as an after dinner drink. Still, very cool.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Cornell Special Cocktail

Cornell Special Cocktail

The Cornell Special Cocktail

1/4 Part Gin. (3/4 oz Tanqueray)
1/4 Part Benedictine. (3/4 oz Benedictine)
1/4 Part Lemon. (3/4 oz Fresh Squeezed Lemon Juice)
1/4 Part Lithia Water. (3/4 oz Gerolsteiner Heavy Mineral Content Mineral Water)

Stir well and serve in cocktail glass.

Well, this one gave me a lot of trouble. I found some online sources that purported to sell “Lithia Water” but none of them would return my phone calls or emails. Driving all the way to Ashland, Oregon seemed pretty crazy.

Did some more research, trying to find mineral waters with a high mineral content and taste. Gerolsteiner was one, and according to some web sites, actually contains some Lithium (Not to mention 8% of your daily allowance of Calcium! Now that is heavy mineral content!)

A lot of chasing around for a drink that ends up tasting like slightly herbaceous, sparkling lemonade. Difficult or not, it certainly is easy drinking.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Commodore Cocktail

Commodore Cocktail

Commodore Cocktail

1 Teaspoonful Syrup. (1 teaspoon depaz cane syrup)
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (1 dash Angostura Orange, 1 Dash Angostura Aromatic)
The Juice of 1/2 Lime or 1/4 Lemon. (1/4 Lemon)
1 Glass Canadian Club Whisky. (1 3/4 oz 40 Creek Barrel Select Whisky, 1/4 oz Buffalo Trace Bourbon)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I’m spiking the 40 Creek with a bit of Bourbon, as I find it a bit insipid all on its own. In some cocktails that works, Byrrh Special for example, in others not so much. In this Canadian Whisky Sour, it seemed like it could use a little goose.

For some reason, I thought the recipe called for regular Angostura Bitters. About half way through, I looked at the books, and realized, “oops!” Anyway, my debut use of the Ango Orange Bitters here.

A perfectly fine and enjoyable Whisk(e)y Sour. Nothing that will blow your mind, but nothing that you would toss out, either.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Clover Leaf Cocktail

Clover Leaf Cocktail

Clover Leaf

The same as CLOVER CLUB, with a sprig of fresh mint on top.

so…

The Juice of 1/2 Lemon or of 1 Lime (Juice 1/2 Lemon)
1/3 Grenadine (3/4 oz Homemade Grenadine)
The White of 1 Egg (whisk this a bit before adding)
2/3 Dry Gin (1 1/2 oz Boodles Gin)

Shake well (Combine above ingredients in boston shaker and shake for a minute or so without ice. Crack the seal on your boston shaker and add ice. Shake well again.) and strain into cocktail glass.

Interesting, how much difference switching two ingredients makes!

For the Clover Club version, the first smell is that of the Tanqueray Gin, then you get the lime. It really is a tart, lean, gin forward cocktail.

With the Boodles and lemon in the Clover Leaf, you get the lemon, the grenadine, and maybe the mint. I guess there is gin in there; but, I’ll be darned if I can taste it.

I guess I would be inclined to call the first Tanqueray and lime drink the manly “Clover Club” and the Boodles and lemon the “Pink Lady”!

Oh, one note, Robert Vermeire, in his book “Cocktails: How to Mix Them” suggests The Clover Club should be “shaken up with one or two sprigs of mint and decorated with a mint leaf on top.” I’ve tried it that way and found it pretty tasty. Though, ultimately, I think maybe lightly muddling the mint sprigs in the gin, then removing them before shaking might be better.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Clover Club Cocktail

Clover Club Cocktail

Clover Club

The Juice of 1/2 Lemon or of 1 Lime (Juice 1 Lime)
1/3 Grenadine (3/4 oz Homemade Grenadine)
The White of 1 Egg (whisk this a bit before adding)
2/3 Dry Gin (1 1/2 oz Tanqueray Gin)

Shake well (Combine above ingredients in boston shaker and shake for a minute or so without ice. Crack the seal on your boston shaker and add ice. Shake well again.) and strain into cocktail glass.

First time I’ve experimented with “Dry Shaking” the ingredients before adding the ice. It does seem to emulsify the ingredients nicely before chilling, and give the foam a better set.

This is actually a much tarter cocktail than I thought it would be. Quite nice, really.

Different versions of this cocktail from different eras call variously for Groseille (Red Currant) Syrup, Raspberry Syrup, and Grenadine.

The erudite Paul Clarke has a wonderful writeup of the cocktail here:

A Change in Fortune

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Classic Cocktail

Classic Cocktail

Classic Cocktail

1/6 Lemon Juice (1/2 oz lemon juice)
1/6 Curacao (1/2 oz Brizard Curacao)
1/6 Maraschino (1/2 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
1/2 Brandy (1 1/2 oz Pierre Ferrand Ambre)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. Frost rim of glass with castor sugar. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

I left off the sugar rim, as it seemed like this cocktail was plenty sweet already.

Sort of an interesting half way point between the Brandy Crusta and the Sidecar, no?

I do kind of wonder if bartenders getting this cocktail mixed up with the Sidecar, is how that cocktail ended up with a sugared rim.

Anyway, quite tasty. Could be a little more tart for my tastes, I suppose.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Cherry Blossom Cocktail

Cherry Blossom Cocktail

Cherry Blossom (6 people)

To a glass half full of cracked ice add a tablespoon of dry Curacao (dash senior Curacao of Curacao), one of Lemon Juice (1 TBSP fresh), one of Grenadine (Fee’s American Beauty Grenadine), 2 1/2 glasses of Cherry Brandy (1 oz Cherry Heering Liqueur) and 2 of brandy (1 oz Pierre Ferrand Ambre Cognac).

Shake thoroughly and serve very cold.

I’ll admit I increased the ratio of lemon here and decreased the Curacao, when re-doing the cocktail for 1 person.

It just seemed like it was going to be waaay too sweet if I left the ratio as is.

As made, it tastes pretty much like drinking a glass of cold cherry juice.

That’s not bad; but, it really doesn’t seem much like a cocktail. More like the missing link between the Sidecar and the Shirley Temple.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.