Apricot Cooler

Coolers:

Apricot Cooler
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon or 1 Lime. (Juice of 1/2 Lemon and 1/2 Lime)
2 Dashes Grenadine. (1 teaspoon Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1 Liqueur Glass Apricot Brandy. (1 1/2 oz Brizard Apry Apricot Liqueur)
Shake well, strain into long tumbler and fill with soda water.

My dependence on Hugo Ensslin continues into the next section. The Apricot Cooler appears to come from his influential 1916 cocktail book, “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”. In it, he gives the recipe as:

Juice of ½ Lemon; Juice of ½ Lime; 2 dashes Grenadine Syrup; ½ Drink Apricot Brandy. Shake in a mixing glass with cracked ice, strain into a Collins glass, add a cube of ice and fill up with Club Soda.

And as with most of the Fizzes, while the Savoy Cocktail book calls for, “Juice of 1/2 Lemon OR 1 Lime”, Ensslin calls for “Juice of 1/2 Lemon AND 1/2 Lime”.

In the case of the Apricot Cooler, the additional citrus doesn’t do much to moderate the rather soda-pop-esque nature of the Apricot Cooler. The way this tastes, the Apricot Cooler would not be at all out of place on the shelf with the various Bartles & Jaymes flavored beverages.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Texas Fizz

Texas Fizz
The Juice of 1/4 Orange. (Juice 1/2 Tangerine)
The Juice of 1/4 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lime)
1 Teaspoonful Powdered Sugar. (Generous teaspoon Rich Simple Syrup)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz North Shore Distiller’s Gin No. 6)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

I am not quite sure why exactly this is a “Texas” Fizz. I guess they do grow a fair amount of citrus there, though I more strongly associate them with Grapefruit.

I massaged it a bit, using the juice of half a Tangerine and half a lime, instead of the 1/4 Lemon and 1/4 Orange it calls for. Ended up pretty tasty.

When I started making these I was still using water from a Britta Pitcher and often found the ice had off flavors. We recently invested in a new more effective filter which attaches to the faucet. The ice is way better. It’s funny, you generally think of cocktails as having fairly big flavors, a little off flavor from the ice isn’t going to ruin anything. Most modern, over driven cocktails probably fall into that category, there’s so much going on you probably wouldn’t notice some off flavor from the ice. On the other hand, with a four ingredient, fairly subtle drink like this and these fizzes, any off flavors from ice, or anything else, are right up there in front.

The easiest way I’ve ever found to find out what your ice tastes like is to pour a few ounces of cold water into your cocktail shaker. Add ice. Shake and strain it into a glass just as if you were making a cocktail. Does the chilled water taste good? If it doesn’t, that same ice isn’t going to be contributing anything good to your cocktails either.

So how about the Texas Fizz?

It’s kind of good, refreshing and light. It’s not a mind blowing cocktail, but it’s also not blowing out your taste buds with your first sip. You drink it and think, “That was nice, what’s next?”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

South Side Fizz

First, just a reminder that Sunday, August 28, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails, (they also have a great beer selection,) on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders, (and me,) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

South Side Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lemon, Juice 1/2 Lime)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (1-ish Tablespoon Rich Simple Syrup, or to taste)
1 Glass Gin. (2 oz Anchor Junipero Gin)

Shake well strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.  Add fresh mint leaves.

As I noted a couple years ago, The South Side, even though it is often now served without soda, has its roots in a Fizz. That is, a Gin Fizz with mint and sprigs of mint for garnish.

The recipe for the South Side Fizz is a little oblique as far as instructions go.

My advice as far as METHOD goes:

Combine Gin, Citrus, Syrup, and a few Mint Leaves in a shaker tin. Shake well and fine strain into an 8 oz Juice or Fizz Glass. Top with Soda Water and garnish with fresh sprigs of mint.

Any drink with leaves of fresh herbs in the shaker tin should always be fine strained. Little green specks of mint look no good in anyone’s teeth, especially when they’re trying to impress their date.

The South Side is another classic cocktail, which really only became possible to make properly with the advent of the modern bar and the return of fresh mint and citrus to the bar set up. It is truly one of the GREAT drinks and a crowd pleaser, tunable for almost any guest, even those that think they don’t like Gin. Also one of my wife’s favorites, give it a try on yours.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Silver Fizz

First, just a reminder that Sunday, August 28, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails, (they also have a great beer selection,) on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders, (and me,) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Silver Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Meyer Lemon, Juice 1/2 Lime)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (Generous Teaspoon Rich Simple Syrup)
l Glass Gin. (2 oz Junipero Gin)
The White of 1 Egg.
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

Do I need to mention that the recipe for this drink was published in Hugo Ensslin’s 1916 “Recipes for Mixed Drinks before the Savoy Cocktail Book? His recipe is minimal: “Made same as plain Gin Fizz, adding the white of an egg.”

I have nothing against Egg White in Fizzes, but just to reiterate, a “plain Gin Fizz” does NOT have Egg White.

However, a Silver Fizz DOES have egg white.

All those Egg White containing Gin Fizzes being served at modern fancy cocktail bars are, in fact, Silver Fizzes. And fine, fine drinks they are indeed.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Ruby Fizz

First, just a reminder that Sunday, August 28, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails, (they also have a great beer selection,) on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders, (and me,) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Ruby Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Meyer Lemon)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (1/2 tsp Rich Simple Syrup)
The White of 1 Egg. (1 Egg White)
2 Dashes Raspberry or Grenadine syrup. (1 TBSP Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1 Glass Sloe Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Sloe Gin)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.
Starting to sound a bit like a Broken record! This is another Fizz from Hugo Ensslin’s 1916 “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”.

His recipe is pretty close to the Savoy recipe, except it does suggest Raspberry Syrup, not give you the choice between it and Grenadine: Juice ½ Lemon; 1 teasponful Powdered Sugar; White 1 Egg; 2 dashes Raspberry Syrup; 1 drink Sloe Gin. Shake and serve as directed for Gin Fizz.

I bounced the recipe a bit more towards the grenadine and a bit less towards the sugar.

One of the Fizzes we frequently get orders for on Savoy Nights, I never really feel any qualms at all about making it, as long as we have Plymouth Sloe Gin in the house. It is really a very tasty drink.

Though for some reason, I always think it has Port Wine in it until I look it up. I guess it is the “Ruby” in the name, as in Ruby Port.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Royal Fizz

Royal Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Meyer Lemon, Juice 1/2 Lime)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (1 TBSP Rich Simple Syrup)
1 Glass Gin. (2 oz Junipero Gin)
1 Egg. (1 Egg)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

Yet another Fizz from Hugo Ensslin’s 1916 “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”, about this Fizz he says, “Made same as plain Gin Fizz, adding the whole of one Egg.”

I do think a whole egg is a little much, with modern eggs as large as they are. Suggest hunting down “Medium” eggs or even just using half a Large or Extra-Large Egg.

Like cream drinks, whole egg drinks sometimes draw the askance look from those perusing the book.

Personally, I like Flips and their Citrus laden brethern, the Egg Sour and Royal Fizz. Heck, even the ones with just Egg Yolks, like the Bosom Caresser are kind of nice.

Well, as they say, your mileage may vary.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Peach Blow Fizz

Peach Blow Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon or 1 Lime (Juice 1/2 Lemon AND juice 1/2 Lime)
4 Mashed Strawberries. (6 Mashed Raspberries)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (Generous Tablespoon Rich Simple Syrup)
1 Tablespoonful Sweet Cream. (1 Tablespoon Heavy Whipping Cream)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Plymouth Gin)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

Another of the Fizzes sourced from Hugo Ensslin’s 1916 “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”, the original recipe is slightly different from the Savoy Cocktail Book:

Peach Blow Fizz: Juice ½ Lime; Juice ½ Lemon; 4 Strawberries, mashed up; 1 teasponful Powdered Sugar; 1 drink Gin; 1 Pony Cream. Made and served as directed for plain Gin Fizz.

Again you see Ensslin calling for more than one type of citrus. His recipe also calls for a bit more cream, generally a “Pony” is considered an ounce.

The Peach Blow Fizz is one of those puzzling cocktails. First off, there’s the whole “Blow” thing, that, as far as I know nobody really understands. Second there’s the “Peach” thing. Why is this a “Peach Blow Fizz” without any peaches?

I have no idea.

What I can tell you is, the Peach Blow Fizz is a delicious species of Fizz.

The cream sometimes freaks people, well men, out. One Savoy Cocktail Book night, a friend was in and interested in Savoy Cocktails with Strawberries. He’d tried the Bloodhound and I’d garnished his King Cole with Strawberries (Fernet and Strawberries, a great combination, by the way) and was looking for a Third drink before calling it a night. I mentioned the Peach Blow Fizz, and he said, “Oooh, that has cream, doesn’t it?” So that was a no go.

Anyway, I think I ended up making a non-strawberry drink, Jabberwock or something, but I was a little sad he didn’t man up and just drink the pink fruity concoction. It’s not like it has a lot of Cream, or anything. It’s no Grasshopper or Brandy Alexander.

Oh, yeah, Raspberries. I forgot to buy strawberries, so substituted frozen raspberries this time. A change I do heartily recommend.

Tasty, pink, fruity, and boozy, it’s actually a pretty serious drink, for all its girliness.

Heh, one of these days, I’m going to have to try it out when I get an order for a Gin and citrus Bartender’s choice, not too sweet. I bet they’ll love it.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Orgeat Fizz

Orgeat Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Meyer Lemon, Juice 1/2 Lime)
1 Liqueur Glass Orgeat. (1 1/2 oz Small Hand Foods Orgeat)
Shake well strain into medium size glass and fill with soda water.

Now, I normally say a “plain fizz” is composed of Spirits, Lemon or lime, Sweetener, and Soda water.

The Orgeat Fizz gives lie to that formula by leaving out the spirits altogether!

To be honest, prior to getting to this section of the book, I made this non-alcoholic drink all the time, maybe with a dash of Bitters or Absinthe for variety, on “alcohol free days”. It is very tasty!

However, one word of warning, I have had some problems occasionally. Some manufacturers include thickeners, (like Xanthan Gum, aka Cabbage Slime,) in their orgeat. These manufacturers do this to discourage the almond oils and solids from falling out of suspension. With these products, especially when just building an Orgeat Fizz, instead of shaking it, the thickened Orgeat sometimes forms capsules instead of mixing nicely with the soda water. Something about the citrus, almond fats, Xanthan Gum, and soda. Ends up being kind of gross, with little globules of Orgeat floating in your drink instead of the syrup being evenly distributed. Not good eats.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Orange Fizz

Orange Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Orange. (Juice 1 Tangerine)
The Juice of 1/4 Lemon or 1/2 Lime. (Juice 1 Meyer Lemon)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Leopold’s Gin)
(1 tsp. Rich Simple Syrup)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda.

Another of the many Savoy Fizzes which seem to stem from Hugo Ensslin’s 1916 “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”, Ensslin gives the recipe as, “Juice ½ Orange; Juice ½ Lime; Juice ½ Lemon; Drink El Bart Gin. Made and served as directed for plain Gin Fizz.”

Ensslin’s Fizzes are very interesting, at least to me, for their use of multiple citrus. In this case, you’ve got Lemon, Lime, and Orange. Outside of so called “Exotic Drinks” you rarely see such variety of citrus called for in drink recipes. Interesting that Ensslin’s recipes pre-date the whole Exotic drink movement by about 30 years. Unlike Vic or Don, in 1916 New York City he probably wasn’t calling on a nostalgia for time spent in the South Sea or the Caribbean for these drinks. Makes you wonder where the inspiration came from.

I did slightly switch up the juices. I only had a Tangerine and some Meyer Lemons. Figured a whole Tangerine amounts to about the juice of a half orange.

Some friends have an enormous Meyer Lemon tree in their back yard which they think must date back at least to the 1940s. It is very nearly weighted down year round with a bumper crop of 100s of lemons. The peels are wonderfully fragrant, much more so than most super market Meyer Lemons, and the juice a tad more acidic than I usually expect from Meyers. I figured the juice of one medium size Meyer Lemon about equaled the souring power of the juice of 1/2 Lemon and 1/2 Lime.

Ensslin neglects to mention any sweetener in this recipe and I’m not sure if it is assumed from the direction, “Made and served as directed for plain Gin Fizz.”

However, I couldn’t quite hang with NO sweetener for the Orange Fizz. If you can, you’re a better man (or woman) than I.

An enjoyable, refreshing drink, I wouldn’t scold you if you embellished this with a touch of bitters, but on the other hand, with great citrus and a light hand on the soda and sweetener, it’s hard to argue with it on a hot day.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

New Orleans Fizz

Get home, prep for Gemelli with Chard and Hot Italian Sausage. Prep done, whip up the New Orleans Fizz, aka Ramos Gin Fizz.

New Orleans Gin Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lemon, Juice 1/2 Lime)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (generous 1 TBSP Rich Simple Syrup)
The White of 1 Egg. (1 Egg White)
1 Glass of Dry Gin. (2 oz Plymouth Gin)
3 Dashes Fleur d’Orange. (1/2 tsp Orange Flower Water)
1 Tablespoonful of Sweet Cream. (1 TBSP Whipping Cream)
Shake well, strain into long tumbler and fill with syphon soda water.

One of the most iconic drinks of New Orleans, the Ramos Fizz is just a rather elaborate Gin Fizz. Instead of just including Cream or Egg White, it includes Cream AND Egg white.

Legendarily, Henry Ramos used to have a line of drink shakers standing on hand, each to do a portion of the shaking of the drink, it needs to be shaken so well and so long.

I did my best, giving it almost a full minute of shaking, making for a somewhat tedious video.

Well, you had New Orleans legend Mr. Dave Bartholomew to listen to while I was shaking, so how can you complain too much?

Finish making pasta:

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.