Keep Sober Cocktail

Keep Sober Cocktail

1/8 Grenadine. (Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1/8 Sirop-de-Citron (Sirop-de-Citron, homemade)
3/4 Tonic. (Clayton’s Kola Tonic)

Serve in long glass and fill with siphon soda.

This one isn’t bad either, ending up tasting rather like a Cherry-Coke, though it wouldn’t be awful to include a little citrus.

Another interesting experiment I tried was mixing in Trader Tiki’s Don’s Mix, instead of the Grenadine. You know, you have to support your friends. Anyway, I found that to be a quite interesting variation, a little spice and a little citric tang, gave this a bit more of a tropical theme and made it a pretty decent non-alcoholic cocktail.

Now if I could only convince Blair from Trader Tiki or Jennifer from Small Hand Foods to make a Kola Tonic, so I don’t have to order it from Barbados next time!

I mean, if you have to Keep Sober, it doesn’t mean you have to suffer.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Clayton’s Temperence Cocktail


Clayton’s Temperance Cocktail
1/4 Sirop-de-citron. (Sirop-de-Citron, homemade)
3/4 Kola Tonic. (Clayton’s Kola Tonic)
Shake well and serve in cocktail glass. (Or build in a glass and top with chilled soda water.)

Not that interesting, just kind of tastes like too sweet lemony cola. Some lime juice (and a splash of High West Rendezvous Rye) rendered it somewhat more palatable. Still, the Pussyfoot was definitely the better cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Clayton’s Pussyfoot Cocktail

Well, the first section after the 700 and some odd “Cocktails” is, drumroll…

Non-Alcoholic Cocktails

Actually, I wish there were some more exciting cocktails here, but most seem to have been cribbed from a “Clayton’s Kola Tonic” brochure.

“Claytons. The drink you have when you’re not having a drink.”

Clayton’s Pussyfoot Cocktail
1/4 Sirop-de-citron. (Sirop-de-Citron, homemade)
1/4 Orange Juice. (Blood Orange Juice)
1/2 Kola Tonic. (Clayton’s Kola Tonic)
Shake well and serve in cocktail glass. (Or build in a short glass and top with chilled soda water.)

These sorts of cocktails, with my really intense and sweet Sirop-de-Citron, I just find to be too concentrated in flavor to be served as “up” cocktails. I much prefer them built with soda water instead, even over ice.

The Clayton’s Pussyfoot is actually darn tasty. I might, or might not, recommend slipping a splash of Rye Whiskey in there, just to juice it up, but certainly, not very much, especially with that name.

Hey, check out the new Schott-Zwiesel glassware. It’s from the Schumann Basic Bar collection. I really like these little glasses. Perfect size for a 19th Century highball or a glass of vermouth while making dinner. They really remind me of some of the vintage highball glassware I’ve seen. Also, they were on sale, so cool!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Re-Vigorator Cocktail

Re-Vigorator Cocktail

Re-Vigorator Cocktail.
1/2 Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/4 Kola Tonic. (Scant 1/2 oz Rose’s Cola Tonic)
1/4 Sirop-de-citron. (1/4 oz Lemon Juice, 1/4 oz Monin Lemon Syrup)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Cheating slightly, as I just can’t face these Kola Tonic and Sirop-de-Citron cocktails without a little bit of citrus juice.

This isn’t, strictly speaking, awful. On the other hand, it isn’t that great, either. Definitely on the Saccharine side, like a vaguely medicinal lemon flavored hard candy.

Good name, though!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Kola Tonic Cocktail

Kola Tonic

Kola Tonic Cocktail

1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Broker’s Gin)
2/3 Kola Tonic. (1 1/2 oz Rose’s Cola Tonic)
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (Dash Fee’s, Dash Regan’s Orange Bitters)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

When I was thinking about this during the day today, I thought it would be pretty awful.

But, I thought there would be enough there for me to find it interesting and re-do it as a long drink over ice and with an orange twist.

It might be a cultural thing, but I found it just too medicinal to even play with.

I’ll admit I tried a Fentiman’s Burdock  soda the last time I was in England that wasn’t far from these flavors. And the Kola Tonic Cocktail is less off balance than I expected. There is a nice bit of bitterness.

However, it totally tastes like cough syrup to me.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Filmograph Cocktail

Filmograph Cocktail

1/2 Brandy. (1 oz Cerbois VSOP Armagnac)
1/4 Kola Tonic. (1/2 oz Rose’s Kola Tonic)
1/4 Sirop-de-citron. (1/2 oz Monin Lemon Syrup)

Shake, (well, stir, I suppose,) and strain into cocktail glass.

I know I promised to make my own Sirop-de-Citron the next time one of the cocktails called for it. And it is even lemon season. Sadly I have failed. And sadly failed this drink. At least with the Monin Lemon Syrup, this is the equivalent of some sort of very sweet hard candy with the Kola Tonic giving it a lovely medicinal edge. Cough Drop in liquid form. It’s hard for me to see this as anything other than a waste of a delicious Brandy.

Earlier in the day, a friend had called. Asking if I happened to have any Armagnac. It isn’t odd for him to ask me for a couple ounces of drink ingredients, as I know he is currently making drinks as part of his personal obsessive-compulsive project to make all the recipes from the “Joy of Cooking”. But, I did think it a bit odd to ask about Armagnac. I mean, there really aren’t that many cocktails that specify Armagnac. Why would they include one with the dozen or so cocktails in the Joy of Cooking? Turns out it is a Sidecar variation which they are inexplicably calling an “Armored Car,” (every google I do for “Armored Car” and “cocktail” turns up tequila and amaretto.)

My friend came over, and I made him an Armagnac Sidecar (2-1-1) with the Cerbois, Cointreau, and fresh lemon juice. Damn, if it wasn’t the best Sidecar I’ve ever made. I’ve actually always thought it a bit of a waste to use a too nice Brandy in Sidecars, as it often gets plowed over by the Cointreau and Lemon. The Armagnac really puts up a fight!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Clayton’s Cocktail

Clayton's Cocktail

Clayton’s Special Cocktail

1/2 Bacardi Rum (2 oz Flor de Cana Extra Dry Rum)
1/4 Kola Tonic (1/2 oz Rose’s Kola Tonic)
1/4 Sirop-de-Citron (1/2 oz Monin Lemon Syrup)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Note: I did slightly increase the ratio of booze to syrup in the recipe.

My big regret is I bought Lemon Syrup instead of making it myself.

The Monin is OK. At least it doesn’t have corn syrup. However, I didn’t realize until I looked at the bottle when I got home, that it does have preservatives, natural flavors, and FD&C Yellow #5.

I know this cocktail would have been at least 200% better with home made lemon syrup. Well, the next time sirop-de-Citron comes up, it’s going to be home made.

The Kola tonic seems to be a fairly subtle flavor to me. I kind of get it as an aftertaste. Nothing really strong. It seems like a dash or two of Fee’s Aromatic Bitters or Lemon Bitters would really punch this cocktail up.

Anyway, quite tasty. Could be a little more tart for my tastes, I suppose.

As an aside, I was sort of wondering who the Clayton in Clayton’s Special Cocktail was.

After a bit of googling, I discovered the following:

According to the wikipedia, Clayton’s was “originally blended and bottled by the Clayton Brothers for the Pure Water Company, Battersea, London, in the 1880s”…and is the brand name of a non-alcoholic, non-carbonated beverage coloured and packaged to resemble bottled whisky. It was the subject of a major marketing campaign in Australia and New Zealand in the 1970’s & 1980s, promoting it as “the drink you have when you’re not having a drink” at a time when alcohol was being targeted as a major factor in the road toll.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.