Maiden’s Prayer Cocktail (No. 2)

Maiden's Prayer (No. 2)

Maiden’s Prayer Cocktail (No. 2*)

1/3 Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Cocchi Americano)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 6)
1/6 Calvados. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Groult Calvados Réserve 3 years old)
1/6 Pricota. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Rothman & Winter Orchard Apricot)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

*On the principle that if at first you don’t succeed, cry, cry again.

According to cocktaildb Pricota was, “Defunct but highly-respected proprietary brand of English apricot-flavored brandy liqueur. Produced by Humphrey Taylor & Co. of London in the late 18th and 19th centuries,” so we’ll use the highly respected R&W Orchard Apricot instead.

Again, even though it is a modern gin, I’ve previously found that the North Shore No. 6 works well with apricot flavors, so I’ve deployed it here.

My bottle of Cocchi Aperitivo Americano, though it has served me well, is nearing a state of tragic emptiness. Here’s hoping someone soon manages to convince the TTB to allow it back into the country.

I’ve found pleasure in the prayers of both of these Maidens and would be hard pressed to pick a favorite. The sweet-tart No. 1 or the bitter-sweet No. 2.

Both are well balanced, witty, and sophisticated young ladies, err… cocktails!

Chuckle, while I appreciate the bloom of sweet-tart youth, I guess I have come to a point in my life where some bitter-sweet experience is more appealing. In cocktails, that is. Right?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Charlie Lindbergh Cocktail

Charlie Lindbergh

Charlie Lindbergh Cocktail

2 Dashes Orange Juice. (2/3 tsp Orange Juice)
2 Dashes Pricota. (2/3 tsp Rothman & Winter Orchard Apricot liqueur)
1/2 Kina Lillet. (1 oz Cocchi Americano)
1/2 Plymouth Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake (stir?) well and serve in cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

I can only assume this is named after Charles Lindbergh, the aviator who flew the first successful non-stop flight between New York and Paris in May of 1927.

The cocktail itself seemed a bit, uh, “girly”. Nice enough, and all, but more of the sort of drink you’d buy for that cute girl you are trying to impress, than the sort of thing you’d have as a brace up after crossing the Atlantic.

If you want to play along and don’t have Cocchi Americano, I’d again suggest 1 oz dry vermouth, dash angosutura, dash maraschino liqueur, and an orange twist squeezed into the tin. It’s pretty close and might even be better in this particular case.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Lily Cocktail

Lily Cocktail
Lily Cocktail

1 Dash Lemon Juice. (ok, a little much, at one teaspoon)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Beefeater’s Gin)
1/3 Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Cocchi Aperitivo Americano)
1/3 Crème de Noyau. (3/4 oz Luxardo Amaretto di Saschira)

Shake (stir?) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I still have a dream that I will one day run across Noyau de Poissy, but until then I’m using the Luxardo Amaretto where Crème de Noyau is called for.

I’ve heard some rumors on the Cocchi Americano front, but nothing concrete yet. I’ve got my fingers crossed!

The Lily is on the sweet side, but I’m surprised to admit I found it a fascinating beverage. The Americano and the Amaretto are a really interesting flavor combination.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Kina Lillet Clone

I made my first attempt at an aperitif wine the other day, aiming for Cocchi Americano or Kina Lillet.

I bought 2 1/2 bottles of reasonably priced Muscadet-Sèvre et Maine, brought it to 140 degrees and added 1 cup of sugar.  Stirred to dissolve.

Then I added the spice tinctures I’d previously made, starting with a touch, and tasting and adding.

I finally ended up with the following amounts, where I started to be able to perceive the earthy flavors of the Quinine and Gentian tinctures in the wine:

2 TBSP Seville Orange Tincture
2 TBSP Mexican Cinnamon Tincture
2 tsp. Gentian Tincture
2 tsp. Wormwood Tincture
3 tsp. Quinine Tincture
1/2 Cup Spanish Brandy

Cooled, poured it back into the bottles, rested for a day, and tried it.

My initial reaction is I got closer to Jean de Lillet than Cocchi Americano. Admittedly, it doesn’t have any Sauterne in the wine blend, so there is no botrytized character, as in the Jean de Lillet.

Challenges: It’s really hard to judge how something warm will taste chilled or in cocktails. I would have had to use much more of the spice tinctures to get close to Cocchi Americano.  It’s tempting to just mull the spices in the warm wine.  But that will make fining or filtering much more challenging.

The Wine was also a weird pick. Muscat Canelli or similar would be a typical choice for the wine base of a vermouth. But I was feeling completely uninspired by my choices of California Muscat. Loire whites are just some of my favorite wines.

A pretty good first try, I think. Everyone who has tried it has been quite complementary. Still, it isn’t what I was hoping for.

Bonus: At the grocery store on the way home they had Sorrento Lemons!  Picked up a couple and it was just the spur I needed to start a new batch of Swedish Punsch.  And yes, Rowley, this time I will make your Lemon Punsch Pie with the leftover sliced lemons.

Kina Cocktail

Kina Cocktail

Kina Cocktail

1/4 Kina Lillet. (1/2 oz Cocchi Americano)
1/2 Dry Gin (1 oz Beefeater Gin)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 oz Carpano Antica)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

To compare and contrast, per discussion in the eGullet Lillet Topic, I also tried making this thusly:

1/2 tsp. Luxardo Maraschino
2 Dash Angostura
Orange Peel
1/2 oz Dolin Vermouth
1 oz Beefeater Gin
1/2 oz Carpano Antica

It should be no surprise to anyone that I really liked both of these cocktails.

On the surface they are quite similar in level of bitterness and overall character. I squeezed a long strip of orange peel into the tin and then dropped it in, stirring the drink with it. Nicely imitated the orange character of the Cocchi.

The Cocchi seems to be using a richer and sweeter wine base, which might be imitated with the simple addition of a dash of gum syrup.

While the spices of the bittering agents are close, the contrasting characters of the warm quinine bitterness of the Cocchi Americano and the sharp gentian bitterness of the Angostura is more of a problem.

A friend  suggested perhaps Fee’s Aromatic Bitters might be a more appropriate bittering agent. Which of the other various bitters currently available has the most quinine character?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

“Hoop La!” Cocktail

Hoop La!

“Hoop La!” Cocktail

1/4 Lemon Juice. (3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/4 Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Cocchi Americano)
1/4 Cointreau. (3/4 oz Cointreau)
1/4 Brandy. (3/4 oz Cerbois VSOP Armangac)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Lemon Peel.)

Well, this is exactly the same as the Frank Sullivan Cocktail, and I’m making it with the same ingredients. Not much too exciting there. Still, an enjoyable cocktail, and I don’t mind at all repeating it. Though, my fast dwindling bottle of Cocchi Americano makes me a bit sad…

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

H. and H. Cocktail

H. and H. Cocktail*

2 Dashes Curacao. (Brizard Orange Curacao)
1/3 Glass Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Cocchi Americano)
2/3 Glass Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz No. 209 Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze orange peel on top.

*Happier and Happier? or Hoarser and Hoarser? or Hazier and Hazier?

If you know anything about me by now, you know that any excuse to combine Gin and Cocchi Americano is a fine excuse to have another drink.

Definitely Hazier and Happier!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Great Secret Cocktail

Great Secret Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1/3 Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Cocchi Americano)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze orange peel on top.

Very tasty!

Pretty close to a Vesper, eh?

I suppose if you were stuck with using Tanqueray or Gordon’s it might make sense to cut the gin with a bit of vodka.

But if you’re using Plymouth, I see no reason.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Frank Sullivan Cocktail

Frank Sullivan Cocktail

1/4 Glass Lemon Juice. (3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/4 Glass Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Cocchi Americano)
1/4 Glass Cointreau. (3/4 oz Cointreau)
1/4 Glass Brandy. (3/4 oz Cerbois VSOP Armagnac)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I guess Frank preferred Brandy in his Corpse Reviver No. 2!

This is a fine, light cocktail, but I have to admit I really missed the dash of Absinthe.

Not sure entirely which Frank Sullivan this was named after, but there was an American journalist, humorist, and author associated with the New Yorker magazine for much of the 20th Century with that name. Sullivan also had some associations with the Algonquin Round table of the 1920s. According to this website, Guide to the Frank Sullivan Collection, he was a Cornell Grad and corresponded with the likes of P.G. Woodhouse, E.B. White, James Thurber, and even James Cagney and Eleanor Roosevelt(!).

Seems like you might need a drink after composing the New Yorker Christmas Poem for half of the 20th Century!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.