Tipperary Cocktail (No. 1)

Tipperary Cocktail (No. 1)
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 oz Carpano Antica)
1/3 Green Chartreuse. (1/2 oz Green Chartreuse)
1/3 Irish Whisky. (1 oz Bushmill’s 10 Year Single Malt, 1/4 oz Gordon & MacPhail Highland Park 8 Year)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

The other day I was picking up some supplies at Cask Store, chatting with my favorite Amandas, when another customer picked up the business card from Cask’s sister bar Rickhouse.  On the back of the card is the recipe for Owen Westman’s cocktail The Laphroig Project.

The Laphroaig Project:
1oz Green Chartreuse
.5oz Laphroaig Quarter Cask
.5oz Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur
.25oz Yellow Chartreuse
1oz Fresh Lemon Juice
2 Dashes Fee Peach Btters

Combine all ingredients into mixing tin and shake vigorously. Double-strain over fresh ice in a double old-fashioned glass. Garnish with a lemon twist and enjoy.

The customer’s jaw dropped, “What? They are using Single Malt Scotch in a Cocktail!? That is just so wrong!!!”

As if the only proper use for an Islay Malt is to pour it reverently into a glass, with maybe a bit of water freshly dipped from a stream in Scotland, and savor it on its own.

While I do believe there is often a point of diminishing returns with using excessively expensive products in Cocktails, using a half an ounce of Laphroig in a cocktail isn’t going to cause the world to end.  No Scotsmen were harmed in the production of the Laphroaig Project.

When I got to the Tipperary Cocktail, I had a couple problems.

Like the recipes for the Opera, The Widow’s Kiss, and the Jewel, equal parts of booze, vermouth, and liqueur is just a bit too rich for me.  I needed to dry this out a bit, and allow the whiskey to shine, before I could start to enjoy it.

My other problem was I am supremely unimpressed with most Irish Whiskey in mixed drinks, especially this one, Bushmill’s Single Malt 10 Year.  As far as I can tell, you might as well be adding vaguely malt flavored water, for all it contributes to most mixed drinks.  Clearly it is not a “mixing whiskey”.

Thinking about what to use to “punch up” the Bushmill’s, I cast my gaze about the basement booze supply. American Whiskey? I think they would over shadow whatever pale character existed in the Irish. Other spirits? Again, hard to think of something that would get along and not run it over. What about Scotch? Hm, there is even a Peated Irish Whiskey, maybe Scotch wouldn’t be too much of a stretch…

So let’s fix it, and piss off some Scotch Whiskey Nerds at the same time.

But what Scotch? It would have to be something not too crazy and over the top in it’s Peaty Smokiness.

How about Highland Scotch? It tends towards the characters I like in Single Malt Scotch, without overwhelming with extremes of Peat and Smoke. Honing in further, I really like Highland Park‘s Whiskies, which are technically from Orkney. (I’ll make a Tipperary for anyone who can identify the source of following quote without resorting to google, “Snow storms forecast imminently in areas Dogger, Viking, Moray, Forth, and Orkney.”) Normally, I keep the Highland Park 12 Year Old around the house, but this Gordon and MacPhail Highland Park 8 Year is a new favorite. Introduced to me by David Driscoll, the Spirits buyer at K&L Wines, there is a lot of the same character you find in the 12, but it has a little bit more youthful punch. It is also a fantastic deal for the money.

Second, I decided, instead of an equal parts cocktail, we’d make it a 2-1-1 version.  That isn’t far from some of my favorite Manhattan Variations, so it seemed a safe bet.

And damn, if that isn’t tasty!  Hit this one exactly in my aromatic cocktail sweet spot.  Lightening the Vermouth and Liqueur changes this from an after dinner candy, to a digestiv.  The added interest of the Scotch brings both whiskies to life.

Give it a try with the Highland Park, or another Scotch Whisky, and let me know what you think.  Don’t be afraid to piss off some Scotsmen or the Irish.  Though we might have to call it “Tipperary Cocktail (No. 3)”.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Paddy Cocktail

Paddy Cocktail

Paddy Cocktail.
1/2 Paddy Irish Whisky. (1 oz Bushmill’s 10 Year Single Malt Irish Whiskey)
1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Dolin Vermouth Rouge)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I thought the milder Irish Whiskey and milder Dolin Rouge would combine well in this cocktial. I was wrong.

To be honest, I just don’t like the Dolin Rouge as a mixer with any whiskey I have tried so far. In this case, it seems to highlight the flabby, malty flavors of the whiskey. The drink also ends up tasting a bit watery. Maybe I should have been a bit more generous with the bitters? Or maybe my Dolin Rouge has expired.

After this failure, whenever whiskey is called for, I’m back to Martini and Rossi Sweet Vermouth. Or Carpano Antica, if I’m feeling flush.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Irish Cocktail

Irish Cocktail

Irish Cocktail

2 Dashes Absinthe. (2/3 tsp. Marteau Verte Classique Absinthe)
2 Dashes Curacao. (2/3 tsp. Luxardo Triplum)
1 Dash Maraschino. (1/3 tsp. Luxardo Maraschino)
1 dash Angostura Bitters.
1/2 Glass Irish Whisky. (1 oz Redbreast Irish Whiskey)

Shake well (stir, please) and strain into cocktail glass. Add olive and squeeze orange peel on top.

I was very tempted to double the whiskey in this one, but I restrained myself, and put it in my tiniest glass.

Pretty much an “Improved Irish Whiskey Cocktail”. To me, the portion of Absinthe seems a bit large for the small amount of Whiskey in this particular cocktail. Washing the glass with, or a single dash of, Absinthe would probably be plenty. And at that point, you’d have a very tasty cocktail indeed.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

“Everybody’s Irish” Cocktail

“Everybody’s Irish” Cocktail

3 Dashes Green Mint. (1/2 tsp. Brizard Creme de Menthe)
6 Dashes Green Chartreuse. (1 tsp. Green Chartreuse)
Irish Whiskey. (2 oz Red Breast Irish Whiskey)

(Stir well with ice, strain into a cocktail glass and…) Add a Green olive.

Created to mark, and now in great demand on, St. Patrick’s Day. The green olive suspended in the liquid, looks like a gibbous moon.

It isn’t quite as “green” as it should be. I don’t have green Creme de Menthe so just used the plain white.

However, all in all, a tasty (and quite potent) cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Cameron’s Kick Cocktail

Cameron's Kick Cocktail

Cameron’s Kick Cocktail

1/3 Scotch Whisky (1 oz Compass Box Asyla Scotch Whisky)
1/3 Irish Whiskey (1 oz Red Breast Irish Whiskey)
1/6 Lemon Juice (1/2 oz fresh)
1/6 Orgeat Syrup (1/2 oz Monin Orgeat)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Squeeze orange peel on top.)

I can’t really think of a funnier or wittier way to put this than Paul Clarke did in his Cocktail Chronicle blog a year or so ago, so I’ll just include a quote:

Cameron’s Kick

Remember the old saw about how, if you took a million monkeys and gave them each a typewriter, they’d eventually come up with the works of Shakespeare? Well edit “typewriter” to read “cocktail shaker,” and stick the monkeys in a well-stocked bar, and the banana-addled mixologists would come up with a Cameron’s Kick in about the same amount of time it’d take that set of simian scribes to work their way around to Titus Andronicus.

Like “Blood in the Sand” it’s another of those cocktails that didn’t really seem anywhere near likely enough that it would be tasty to work it’s way up the list.

Yet here it is, and I quite enjoyed it.

Sweet and tart. Puzzling and a bit exotic. Some elements of spice, and some elements of Scotch Whiskey.

It really doesn’t seem like it should work. But, it does.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Brain-Storm Cocktail

Brain-Storm Cocktail

1/2 Wineglass Irish Whisky (1 1/2 oz Red Breast Whisky)
2 Dashes Benedictine (1 Barspoon Benedictine)
2 Dashes French Vermouth (1 Barspoon Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)

Squeeze orange peel on top. (Drop peel into mixing glass.) Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.

I liked this one a lot, actually. It’s fairly subtle, as cocktails go. Whiskey, herbey, orange. Sophisticated, I’d go so far as to say.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Blackthorn Cocktail

Blackthorn Cocktail
3 Dashes Angostura Bitters
3 Dashes Absinthe (Verte de Fougerolles)
1/2 Irish Whisky (1 1/2 oz Redbreast Irish Whiskey)
1/2 French Vermouth (1 1/2 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)

Shake (stir – eje) well and strain into cocktail glass

The Blackthorn (Prunus spinosa) is a bushy, spiny relative of the plum. It is often planted as living barbed wire in rural landscaping. Its wood is quite hard and the one of the traditional materials from which Irish Shillelaghs are made. It is also used to make sturdy walking sticks. The fruit of the Blackthorn is called a sloe and is used to flavor sloe gin.

In the Cocktaildb there are 6 “Blackthorn” cocktails. Many, not surprisingly, involve sloe gin. This version is sometimes called the “Irish Blackthorn”.

It’s a pleasant cocktail, with the smell and taste of the Absinthe being the first thing you notice. The vermouth and Absinthe dominate the middle tastes. There seemed to be a phantom cherry-like taste in the finish. The Irish Whiskey, despite being fairly assertive and quite delicious, seemed to disappear into the cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.