Scoff-law Cocktail

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Scoff-Law Cocktail.
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (1 Dash Regan’s Orange Bitters)
1/3 Canadian Club Whisky. (3/4 oz 40 Creek Three Grains)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)
1/6 lemon Juice. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/6 Grenadine. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

For what it is worth, Harry McElhone’s Barflies and Cocktails calls for Rye, instead of the Savoy “Canadian Club”.  Even though, in deference to Mr. Craddock, I went with Canadian Whisky, generally, I agree with Mr. McElhone in these matters.

While researching the Scoff-Law, I turned up the following from the Chicago Tribune, January 27th, 1924: “Hardly has Boston added to the Gaiety of Nations by adding to Webster’s Dictionary the opprobrious term of “scoff-law” to indicate the chap who indicts the bootlegger, when Paris comes back with a “wet answer”—Jock, the genial bartender of Harry’s New York Bar, yesterday invented the Scoff-law Cocktail, and it has already become exceedingly popular among American prohibition dodgers.”

Made to the Savoy recipe, this is a pleasant, light, tart, easy drinking libation.  Many modern sources bump up the booze a bit more and often leave out the orange bitters.  I kind of like it the way it is, with the sweet/tart balance not dissimilar to a red wine.

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This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Savoy Hotel Special Cocktail* (No. 1)

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Savoy Hotel Special Cocktail* (No. 1)
1 Dash Absinthe. (Sirene Absinthe Verte)
2 Dashes Grenadine. (5ml Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Beefeater Gin)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

* Peter ninth Earl of Savoy, brought to England, as his wards, eighty-three of the most wealthy and beautiful girls in France. He then married them to the most powerful nobles in England. That is why he wore armour.

On the Roselyn cocktail I complained about pointless and gratuitous en-pinkening of cocktails. Well, at least in the case of the Savoy Hotel Special (No. 1), there’s enough of interest here that you don’t mind it is slightly pink.

One thing I have noticed is a gross discrepancy in the size of bar spoons. To alleviate the questionable measuring in using them, I have decided to begin deploying a device called an Urban Bar Spoon. On one side it has a 5ml measure and on the other a 2.5ml measure. Going forward, for liquid items like grenadine, lemon juice, and others not typically kept in dasher bottles, I’m going to use a 2.5ml per dash standard. A bit large, I know, but I am also probably making the cocktails on the large side.

Edit: Fix typo in bar spoon size.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Santiago Cocktail

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Santiago Cocktail
2 Dashes Grenadine. (1 teaspoon Small Hands Food Grenadine)
2 Dashes Lemon Juice. (1 teaspoon Lemon Juice)
1 Glass Bacardi Rum. (2 oz Barbancourt White Rum)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Being slightly generous here with the proportions of Grenadine and Lemon Juice in this Daiquiri-like cocktail. I’m also picking a slightly more flavorful r(h)um that I would typically, as the drink is basically all spirits.

It isn’t awful, exactly, as I am very fond of Barbancourt’s white rum in most contexts. It is not, however, the sort of drink that you would probably make for someone who doesn’t like the flavor of booze in their cocktails.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Roy Howard Cocktail

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Roy Howard Cocktail.
1/2 Glass Kina Lillet. (1 oz Lillet Blanc)
1/4 Glass Brandy. (1/2 oz Chateau Pellehaut Armagnac)
1/4 Glass Orange Juice. (1/2 oz Orange Juice)
2 Dashes Grenadine. (Dash Homemade Grenadine)
(dash Angostura)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

This is actually quite enjoyable, despite its low alcohol content. Not enough juice to make it overly fruity, beyond the wine. And, indeed, the sweet/sour balance is closer to that of a wine that a sour cocktail.

Roy W. Howard, if indeed it is his namesake cocktail,was a correspondent for the Scripps McRae Newspapers and the president of United Press.

He moved to Scripps newspapers in 1920, and, by 1922, he was leading the company. He bought and consolidated newspapers and instituted a practice of investigative and public service journalism that, over the next decades, led to breaking union racketeering, uncovering bank scandals, exposing political corruption and prompting governmental safety regulations in the workplace.

Quite a lot of accomplishments, really. I can see why you would want a relatively low voltage cocktail to be able to keep your wits about you.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Royal Clover Club Cocktail

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Royal Clover Club Cocktail.
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
1 Tablespoonful Grenadine. (Generous Tablespoon homemade Grenadine)
The Yolk of 1 Egg.
1 Glass Gin. (2 oz Beefeater’s Gin)
Shake well and strain into medium size glass.

An enjoyable cocktail. Sadly the last of the Clover Club family, including the Clover Club, Clover Leaf, and Grand Royal Clover Club.

Though, I suppose I could go through and re-do them all with Small Hand Foods Raspberry Gum instead of Grenadine…

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Royal Smile Cocktail

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Royal Smile Cocktail.
The Juice of 1/4 Lemon. (1/2 oz Lemon Juice)
1/4 Grenadine. (1/2 oz Homeade Grenadine)
1/2 Applejack or Calvados. (1 oz Calvados Groult Reserve)
1/4 Dry Gin. (1/2 oz Krogstad Aquavit*)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Oh my goodness, how did that Aquavit get into this cocktail?

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Thinking about Calvados, flavors, and cocktails, the anise-caraway medley of the Krogstad Aquavit lept to mind. And after making it with Aquavit, I didn’t even bother making it again with Gin. I think Gin just functions as filler in this cocktail, anyway, stretching the more expensive Calvados with neutral flavors.

Aquavit, however, combines very nicely with the vegetal aspects of the Calvados, and the Krogstad, with its strong Anise adds even more to the drink than a traditional aquavit would.

I really liked my variation on the Royal Smile. Give it a try and let me know if I’m crazy.

*The Krogstad Aquavit used in this cocktail was sent to me as a promotional gift by House Spirits, its producer.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Roselyn Cocktail

Roselyn cocktail

Roselyn Cocktail.

2 Dashes Grenadine. (Bar Spoon Homemade Grenadine)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Beefeater’s Gin)

Shake well and strain into a cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

For some reason, I just felt like going with the actual instructions for a change and shaking this.

Only a very, very slight difference from the preceding “Rose Cocktail (French Style No. 1)”, I can’t say the Roselyn is exactly anything ground breaking. Another slightly sweetened and en-pinkened Dry Martini. Not that there is anything wrong with that, per se. It’s just if you’re going to go around pinkening Martinis, doing it with Peychaud’s or Angostura Bitters would be a lot more flavorful than grenadine.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Rose Cocktail (French Style Nos. 1-3)

As these Rose Cocktail (French Style) are all pretty much variations on the same thing, it seemed sensible to tackle them all in the same post.

The components seem to be booze (gin and/or kirsch), red sweet fluid (Cherry Heering, Grenadine, or Syrup Groseille) and French Vermouth.

Rose Cocktail (French Style No. 1)

Rose Cocktail (French Style No. 1)

1/4 Cherry Brandy. (1/2 oz Cherry Heering)

1/4 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)

1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.

The first of the French Rose Cocktails is the most “Martini-like”. Not bad, but a bit plain, along the lines of a slightly fruity Dry Gin Martini.

Rose Cocktail (French Style No. 2)

Rose Cocktail (French Style No. 2)

1/4 Cherry Brandy. (1/2 oz Cherry Heering)

1/4 Kirsch. (1/2 oz Clear Creek Kirsch)

1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.

French Rose Cocktail No. 2 is the booziest, being 3/4 booze and 1/4 liqueur. If you make this, give it a good long stir. Even then, I didn’t find it all that appealing.

Rose Cocktail (French Style No. 3)

1 Teaspoonful Grenadine.
1/2 French Vermouth.
1/2 Kirsch.

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

That sounds OK, but looking through Harry McElhone’s “Barflies and Cocktails”, I found the following receipt:

Rose Cocktail (French Style No. 3)

Rose Cocktail

2/3 French Vermouth (1 1/2 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/6 Kirschwasser (1/2 of 3/4 oz Clear Creek Kirsch)
1/6 Syrup Groseille (1/2 oz 3/4 oz Homemade Grenadine).

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass, with cherry. Original Recipe by Johnny, of the Chatham Bar, Paris.

Now to me that is something interesting, along the lines of the Rose Cocktail (English Style) or the Chrysanthemum Cocktail. A nice, light, vermouth heavy cocktail, not overly sweet. With a good quality vermouth, this makes quite a pleasant appetizer, and it is more than worthwhile messing around with the proportions to find the exact ratio which is exactly to your taste.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Rose Cocktail (English)

Rose Cocktail (English)

Rose Cocktail (English)
1 Dash Lemon Juice.
4 Dashes Grenadine. (1 Generous Bar Spoon Homemade Grenadine)
1/4 Apricot Brandy. (1/2 oz Rothman and Winter Blumme Marillen Apricot Eau de Vie)
1/4 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Noilly Prat Original Dry Vermouth)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. Frost edge of cocktail glass with castor sugar.

OK, I cheated. While it is unclear whether this recipe should be made with Apricot Liqueur or Apricot Eau-de-Vie, I just couldn’t justify the sugar rim if I made it with Apricot Brandy. And boy is it good with Apricot Eau-de-Vie. Such a nice combination of flavors.

Just on the edge of tart with fruit coming from the grenadine and eau-de-vie. A balance near what you’d expect from a red wine like a Pinot, it is tart and dry enough that the sugar rim makes sense. Highly recommended, one of the tastier cocktails I’ve made in a while, despite the somewhat finicky measures and obscure ingredients.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Robson Cocktail

Robson Cocktail

Robson Cocktail.
1/8 Lemon Juice. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/8 Orange Juice. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Orange Juice)
1/4 Grenadine. (3/4 oz Homemade Grenadine)
1/2 Jamaica Rum. (1 1/2 oz Appleton V/X Rum)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Actually, this is exactly what I would consider a “Planter’s Punch”, as opposed to those two earlier “Planter’s Cocktails” (No. 1 and No. 2).  Multiple Citrus, check.  Grenadine, check.  Jamaican Rum, check.  Yep, that’s a “Planter’s Punch” all right.

Tasty, too, though you could probably go with something a bit more distinctive than the Appleton V/X.  Coruba might be awesome, or Haus Alpenz’ Smith and Cross Jamaica Rum, if you were feeling adventurous.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.