Tipperary Cocktail (No. 2)

Tipperary Cocktail (No. 2)
1/6 Orange Juice. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Orange Juice)
1/6 Grenadine. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Grenadine)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Martin Miller’s Gin)
2 Sprigs Green Mint. (2 sadly nearly decimated Sprigs “Julep Mint”, 1 Sprig “The Survivor” Lemon Balm)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I’ve been trying to grow Spearmint in my back yard for several years now.

Mint! Did you hear me? Trying to grow Mint! It’s crazy, everyone else I know has to beat the Mint back with a stick, it grows out of control without them even trying.

However, I have been foiled on every attempt. One turned black and just disappeared, one got dried out in a couple days of inexplicably hot weather, the last plant chewed down to the veins by some unnamed pest.

It’s just sad, I barely had enough to qualify as 2 sprigs in this drink, so I added some of the lemon balm that does grow like a pest in my back yard, self seeding and spreading everywhere.

This is a tad sweet, as a cocktail, really could use a dash of lemon or lime to balance out that Grenadine. On the whole, though, not so bad.

I suppose rather than being the tipple of choice among the Irish of Tipperary, this was more likely a beverage favored by the British Soldiers and Officers living in the Barracks.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Three Miller Cocktail

Three Miller Cocktail

1 Teaspoonful Grenadine. (1 Teaspoon Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1 Dash Lemon Juice. (1 Dash Lemon Juice)
2/3 Brandy. (1 1/2 oz Cognac Park V.S.O.P.)
1/3 Bacardi Rum. (3/4 oz Rene Alambic Rum)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

In Harry McElhone’s book “Barflies and Cocktails”, a drink with these ingredients is called “The Three Mile Limit”, referring to the distance a ship had to be from shore to evade the long arm of the law. McElhone also notes, “This cocktail was invented at Harry’s New York Bar, Paris, by “Chips,” Brighton, the popular Bartender. One of the effects of the Volstead Act, people get busy when outside of the three miles.”

While, “The Three Mile Limit” is a fine, if somewhat literal, name for a cocktail, it doesn’t really roll off the tongue. You can certainly imagine that name being shortened rather quickly to, “The Three Miler”. What happened for Craddock to rename it “The Three Miller”, we will never know, but it is a rather better name than either Three Miler or Three Mile Limit.

The cocktail itself is of the mostly booze sort, which, aside from the Super Extra Dry Martini, has largely gone out of fashion with modern drinkers. Probably, if someone were to ask me for this in a bar, I would make something like: 1 1/2 oz Brandy, 1/2 oz Rum, 1/2 oz Lemon, 1/2 oz Grenadine. Or if they were young, maybe even, 1 oz Brandy, 1/2 oz Rum, 3/4 oz Lemon, 1/2 oz Grenadine, 1/2 oz Simple Syrup. But either way, we’re getting pretty far from the almost all booze of the original formulation, which I even found a bit hard going, basically a glass of cold Brandy.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sunrise Cocktail

Sunrise Cocktail
1/4 Grenadine. (1/3 oz Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1/4 Crème de Violette. (1/3 oz Benoit-Serres Liqueur de Violette)
1/4 Yellow Chartreuse. (1/3 oz Yellow Chartreuse)
1/4 Cointreau. (1/3 oz Cointreau)
Use liqueur glass and pour ingredients in carefully so that they do not mix.

Odd to have two Pousse Cafe style cocktails so close together.

I tried to pour this in the order given, only to discover that the Yellow Chartreuse preferred to be under the Liqueur de Violette. Well, if you pour these things steadily and slowly enough, they usually self correct.

Can’t say that there is anything in particular to recommend this combination, other than maybe that the orange of the Cointreau and the Violette of the Benoit-Serres are a pretty interesting combo.

Other than that, it’s just a pretty drink, even if it is slightly out of order.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Stanley Cocktail

Stanley Cocktail
1/6 Lemon Juice. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/6 Grenadine. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1/3 Rum. (3/4 oz Rene Alambic Rum)
1/3 Gin. (3/4 oz Ransom Old Tom Gin)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Oh, fun! This recipe specifies neither the type of Rum nor Type of Gin! Carte Blanche!

I found this odd Alambic Rum at a small liquor store in the city of Napa, California. I have no idea about the nature of the beast, other than that the bottle notes it is, “Distilled by Solomon Tournour Co. Capella, CA 95418.” It is, for an 80 Proof Rum, rather flavorful and delicious. It appears to have some color, so must have seen at least some small amount of time in the barrel. I keep going back and forth on whether I think it is Molasses or Sugar based. My guess is Molasses, but it is very well distilled and tasty. It does almost taste like a Rhum Agricole.

Anyway, funky Napa R(h)um, and what Gin to mix with?

Ha! Obviously it needs a funky Gin! And as funky Gins go, I can’t think of one more appropriate than Ransom Old Tom, from Portland!

What does this combination of unusual ingredients result in?

Well, it sure as hell isn’t a Bacardi Cocktail!

Kind of Tasty, though, if I don’t say so myself! Mr. Stanley may have been on to something!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

So-So Cocktail

So-So Cocktail
1/6 Grenadine. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1/6 Calvados. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Calvados Moritz)
1/3 Italian Vermouth (3/4 oz Carpano Antica)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Northshore Distiller’s No. 6)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

According to Harry McElhone in his book, “Barflies and Cocktails,” this cocktail was, “Invented by Mr. P. Soso, the popular manager of Kit-Kat Club, London.”

Hm, Harry, that sounds a bit facetious.

Again, I believe we have the Gin acting as an extender to the rather more flavorful and expensive Calvados.

Most importantly, should you order this cocktail during the next Savoy Night at Alembic Bar, May 23rd, 2010? Well, strictly speaking the So-So isn’t awful. It is, however, rather sweet. If I were you, I would stick with a straight ahead Apple or Grape Brandy Manhattan, and skip the So-So altogether. Say, perhaps, the often unjustly ignored Corpse Reviver No. 1. Or, if you have your heart set on Apple Brandy and Grenadine, try Mrs. Flannestad’s favorite: The Jack Rose Cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sonza’s Wilson Cocktail

Sonza’s Wilson Cocktail

1/2 Gin. (1 oz Square One Botanical*)
1/2 Cherry Brandy. (1 oz Clear Creek Kirsch)
4 Dashes Lemon Juice or Lime Juice. (10ml Lemon Juice)
4 Dashes Grenadine. (10ml Small Hand Foods Grenadine)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Well, after using Tequila in the last cocktail, what do I have to lose?

This is another cocktail in the “Rose” family, which, by all rights should be composed of 1 oz of Gin, 1 oz of Cherry Heering, dashes of lemon, and dashes of Grenadine.

I’m sorry, but that didn’t sound very appealing at all. So I decided to throw that idea to the wind, and give this a twist.

Square One Botanical is a vodka infused with various botanicals and then distilled. But for the fact that it has no Juniper, it could almost be a gin. When I decided to use Kirsch for this, I also thought, hm, Square One Botanical!

However, as Square One Botanical did not exist in 1930, I suppose I should think of another name…

How about this?

Rosa californica**

1 oz Square One Botanical
1 oz Kirsch (Cherry Eau-de-Vie)
2 10ml/2tsp. Lemon Juice
2 10ml/2tsp. Grenadine

Shake with ice and strain into a cocktail glass.

And goddamn, I was as right with this idea as I was wrong with the Sonora. Floral, light, and delicious. Very nice. Though, technically, if I really want to make a cocktail called “Wild California Rose”, I should be using a Kirsch from this state. Doesn’t St. George make one?

Most importantly, should you order this cocktail during the next Savoy Night at Alembic Bar, May 23rd, 2010? Well, unless you ask specifically for the underhill version, you will probably get the rather sickly sweet sounding exact Savoy recipe. I am also not sure if Alembic even has Square One Botanical. Seems like pretty dodgy chances.

*The Square One Botanical in this cocktail was sent to me by Square One. It works quite well in this cocktail. Unfortunately, it’s fairly unique, so I have no real substitution suggestions. Hendrick’s maybe, though it would be a very different drink.

**The “Scientific” name for the Wild California Rose. Hrm. OK, fine, Mr. Stickler man, it’s actually the Linnaean classification for the Wild California Rose.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sir Walter Cocktail

016

Sir Walter Cocktail
(Commonly known as the “Swalter”)
1 Teaspoonful Grenadine. (1 teaspoon Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1 Teaspoonful Curacao. (1 teaspoon Bols Dry Orange Curacao)
1 Teaspoonful Lemon Juice. (1 teaspoon Lemon Juice)
1/3 Brandy. (3/4 oz Germain-Robin Fine Alambic Brandy)
1/3 Rum. (3/4 oz Barbancourt 15 Rum)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

It’s kind of hard to know which Sir Walter Raleigh this cocktail is named after. The Sir Walter Raleigh who was an “English aristocrat, writer, poet, soldier, courtier, and explorer who is also largely known for introducing tobacco to Europe,” or the Sir Walter Raleigh who was a “Scottish scholar, poet and author.”

Going from the dates of their lives and the date the Savoy Cocktail Book was published, it seems nominally more likely that this was named after the Scottish scholar, poet, and author, especially since he was well known during World War I.

On the other hand, the other Sir Walter, at least at this point in history, is far more well known.

To me, the ingredients don’t give much illumination, they could have been available in the 16th Century or the 20th Century.  In fact, it is kind of a punchy formulation, though probably in the 16th Century, not many barkeeps were bothering with single serving punches.

Fairly tasty, my advice would be to go long on the lemon juice, and short on the grenadine and Curacao.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Shanghai Cocktail

029

Shanghai Cocktail
2 Dashes Grenadine. (5ml Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
3/8 Lemon Juice. (3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/8 Anisette. (1/4 oz Anis del Mono Dulce a.k.a. Devil Juice)
1/2 Jamaica Rum. (1 oz Smith & Cross Jamaican Rum)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Annoying measures, to be sure. I think I got it mostly right, though every time I look at it, I think it is wrong.

Amusingly, when Mrs. Flannestad was in High School, she traveled to France for an exchange trip. Probably one of the formative experiences of her life, as she met some of her best friends to this day. But anyway, for some reason, she took to swigging Marie Brizard Anisette, so much so, that some of her schoolmates started calling her “Marie Brizard”.

Sadly, the Brizard products seem to have evaporated from many of the local liquor stores. Not sure what is up with that, as I always meant to get some of their White Creme de Cacao. Anyone have a suggestion for another decent White Creme de Cacao brand? I haven’t been much impressed with any I have tried so far.

This is a very odd drink, a combination I would never make if it weren’t for the Savoy Cocktail Book Project, to be sure. A Jamaican Rum Sour sweetened with Grenadine and Anisette. I was drinking it, and thinking, “this is weird, but I sort of like it.” Fairly tart and with an interesting light sweetness from the anise, it is oddly refreshing. So odd, that I thought I should try and get a second opinion, so I ran it past Mrs. Flannestad. She also was of the not entirely unguarded opinion, “I kind of like it.”

Not a lost classic, by any means, but a pretty interesting flavor combination, and not entirely unlikeable.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

S.G. Cocktail

010

“S.G.” Cocktail
1 Teaspoonful Grenadine. (1 teaspoon Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1/3 Canadian Club Whisky. (3/4 oz 40 Creek Three Grain)
1/3 Lemon Juice. (3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/3 Orange Juice. (3/4 oz Blood Orange Juice)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

This Cocktail is very popular in the Officers’ Mess of the Scots Guards, hence its name.

When I cut this orange open, I was surprised to discover it was a Moro Blood Orange. Lost in the back of the fridge door, I must have purchased it at some point in the past for a long forgotten project or cocktail.

Well, not to waste anything, I used it anyway.

Certainly, without the blood orange juice, the S.G. would be a far less colorful drink.

It is nice that it is colorful, tasty and refreshing. The minor amount of sweetener and relatively minor amount of whiskey make it a lot lighter than most cocktails made these days. I suppose it really is a whiskey screwdriver, but quite a bit tarter.

I find it a bit odd that the members of the Scots Guards were drinking something so mild and NOT involving Scotch Whisky. Maybe this is what they drink in the morning after the night before.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

September Morn Cocktail

022

September Morn Cocktail.
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon or 1 Lime. (Juice 1/2 Lemon)
1 Tablespoonful Grenadine. (1 Tablespoon Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
The White of 1 Egg. (1/2 oz Egg White)
1 Glass Bacardi Rum. (2 oz Havana Club Anejo Blanco)
(Dry shake liquid ingredients, add ice and…) Shake well and strain into medium size glass.

Not sure how you want to look at this. A Clover Club with Rum instead of Gin? A Bacardi Cocktail with Egg White? Either works, I guess.

The name of this drink probably comes from a “scandalous painting”.

From an article by Bonnie Bell: The September Morn Story.

On a September morning in 1912, French painter Paul Chabas finished the painting he had been working on for three consecutive summers. Thus completed, it was aptly titled “Matinee de Septembre” (September Morn). As was typical of his style, the painting was of young maiden posed nude in a natural setting. This time the icy morning waters of Lake Annecy in Upper Savoy formed the natural setting and the maiden was a local peasant girl. The head, however, had been painted from the sketch of a young American girl, Julie Phillips (later Mrs. Thompson), which he had made while she and her mother were sitting in a Paris cafe. Apparently, he had found her profile to be exactly what he was looking for. The completed painting was then sent off to the Paris Salon of 1912 to be exhibited. Although the painting won Mr. Chabas the Medal of Honor, it caused no flurry of attention. Hoping to find a buyer, the artist shipped the painting overseas to an American gallery.

It was here in America that the painting was destined to receive undreamed of publicity and popularity. One day in May of 1913, displayed in the window of a Manhattan art gallery, it caught the eye of Anthony Comstock, head of the New York Society for the Suppression of Vice. Horrified by what he saw, he stormed into the store, flashed his badge, and roared: “There’s too little morn and too much maid. Take her out!” The gallery manager, however, refused to do so. The ensuing controversy was given wide publicity by the press and the painting was simultaneously denounced and defended across the entire country. Meanwhile, curious crowds filled the street outside the shop straining to see the painting that caused such a stir.

More information here:

The September Morn Hoax

As for the cocktail, it is quite tasty, especially when made with a flavorful grenadine and rum.  Chuckle, I suppose it is the pink, fleshy color of the drink and the painting, which whomever invented it was thinking of.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.