“Hawaiian Punch”

“Could you make me something tall, refreshing and non-boozy?”

“No problem…”

Minutes later, “Ha, I think I have inadvertently discovered the secret formula for ‘Hawaiian Punch’!”

“Hawaiian Punch”

2 oz Orange Juice
1 oz Pineapple Juice
1/2 oz Lime Juice
1/2 oz Grenadine

Shake and strain over ice cubes in a 14-16 oz glass. Top with chilled soda water.

Savoy Hotel Rickey

Savoy Hotel Rickey
Use medium size glass.
1 Lump of Ice.
The Juice of 1/2 Lime or 1/4 Lemon. (Juice 1/4 Lemon)
1 Glass Gin. (2 oz North Shore No 6)
4 Dashes Grenadine. (1 Teaspoon of Small hand Foods Grenadine)
Fill with Carbonated Water and leave Rind of Lime or Lemon in glass.

A Gin Rickey, slightly enpinkened, the Savoy Hotel Rickey isn’t anything particularly fancy.

On the other hand, it is really easy to make and quite refreshing.

A good drink for lazy summer afternoons, when actually shaking something is a little too much effort. Build it over the ice, give it a stir or two. Top up with soda and you’re done.

Hard to beat!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Sea Breeze Cooler

Sea Breeze Cooler
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1 very small Lemon)
2 Dashes Grenadine. (1 teaspoon Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1/2 Apricot Brandy. (1 oz Brizard ‘Apry’ Apricot Liqueur)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz North Shore Distiller’s No 6 Gin)
1 Lump of ice.
Use long tumbler and fill with soda Water. 2 sprigs fresh mint on top.

Usually, the modern Sea Breeze, which I associate with the 1970s for some reason, is made up of Vodka, Cranberry Juice, and Grapefruit, shaken and served on the rocks with a lime wedge garnish.

Well, this ain’t that drink, and I am unclear if there is any causal relationship between the two.

On the other hand, though the Sea Breeze Cooler is fairly mild, I actually quite enjoyed it. It is slightly girly with that name and the pinkness, but on a hot day it seems like it would be refreshing.

I chose the North Shore No. 6, as it has on many occasions proven to be friendly to citrus and apricot. It did not disappoint.

I did throw a few of the stripped mint leaves into the drink when I shook it. Then I did not strain it through a fine sieve, which was a serious error. You can now see a fine layer of pulverized mint leaves floating on top of the drink, just waiting to get stuck between your date’s teeth. Never good.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Lone Tree Cooler

Lone Tree Cooler
The Juice of 1/4 Lemon. (Juice 1/4 Lemon)
The Juice of 1 Orange. (Juice 1 orange)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Hayman’s Old Tom Gin)
1 Liqueur Glass Grenadine. (1 oz Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
(2 dash Absinthe Verte)
Shake well strain into tumbler and fill with soda water.

I dunno, I just felt like a little Absinthe would add some interest to this rather odd recipe. Vermouth in a Cooler? Juice of 1 Orange? Anyway, it’s another cocktail where I wish I had cracked a book and done some research before making it…

As usual, the theoretical source for this recipe was Hugo Ensslin’s 1916, “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”.

However, Hugo’s recipe is hugely different:

Lone Tree Cooler
Juice of 1 Lemon;
Juice of ¼ Orange;
Pony Grenadine.

Made and served same as Apricot Cooler.

Righto. Well, there you go, cough, no booze at all, that’s way too brazen to be a typo. I guess whomever wrote the Savoy Cocktail Book felt the Lone Tree Cooler was good, but needed a little something to juice it up, like Gin and Dry Vermouth. Of course, then I came along and felt like it needed even a little more electricity, a la Maurice, and added Absinthe.

It is a wonder the same drink gets made the same way in more than once!

Ha! Sometimes I wonder if the same drink IS ever made more than once!

Well, if you’re looking for a non-alcoholic drink, you could certainly do worse than this lemonade sweetened with Grenadine, or, alternatively, slightly tarted up Shirley Temple.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Apricot Cooler

Coolers:

Apricot Cooler
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon or 1 Lime. (Juice of 1/2 Lemon and 1/2 Lime)
2 Dashes Grenadine. (1 teaspoon Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1 Liqueur Glass Apricot Brandy. (1 1/2 oz Brizard Apry Apricot Liqueur)
Shake well, strain into long tumbler and fill with soda water.

My dependence on Hugo Ensslin continues into the next section. The Apricot Cooler appears to come from his influential 1916 cocktail book, “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”. In it, he gives the recipe as:

Juice of ½ Lemon; Juice of ½ Lime; 2 dashes Grenadine Syrup; ½ Drink Apricot Brandy. Shake in a mixing glass with cracked ice, strain into a Collins glass, add a cube of ice and fill up with Club Soda.

And as with most of the Fizzes, while the Savoy Cocktail book calls for, “Juice of 1/2 Lemon OR 1 Lime”, Ensslin calls for “Juice of 1/2 Lemon AND 1/2 Lime”.

In the case of the Apricot Cooler, the additional citrus doesn’t do much to moderate the rather soda-pop-esque nature of the Apricot Cooler. The way this tastes, the Apricot Cooler would not be at all out of place on the shelf with the various Bartles & Jaymes flavored beverages.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

May Blossom Fizz

First, just a reminder that Sunday, July 31, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails, (they also have a great beer selection,) on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders, (and me,) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

May Blossom Fizz
1 Teaspoonful Grenadine. (1 teaspoon Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lemon)
1 Liqueur Glass Swedish Punch. (1 1/2 oz Forgotten Flavors Swedish Punsch)
(2 Dash Miracle Mile Gingerbread Bitters)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with soda water.

I think I got this small bottle of the Forgotten Flavors Swedish Punsch as a consolation prize for missing out on the CSOWG house at Tales a couple years ago. The Forgotten Flavors Punsch is pretty good, but it’s my understanding Haus Alpenz will shortly be importing my all-time favorite Facile Swedish Punch, so no reason to go spending all that money getting Punsch shipped from Germany. I mean, you can always make your own, a la Underhill-Punsch, it’s way less work than Milk Punch, trust me.

The Gingerbread Bitters were a nice improvisation, upping the spice and bitterness quotient in what might otherwise be a somewhat plain cocktail. Tasty, definitely a recommended use for Swedish Punsch.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Hoffman Fizz

Dinner Prep

Prep for Fusilli with Summer Vegetables.

Hoffman Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lime, Juice 1/2 Lemon)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (1 Teaspoon Rich Simple Syrup)
1 Glass Gin. (2 oz Leopold’s Gin)
Shake well strain into medium size glass and fill with sypon soda water. Add teaspoonful of Grenadine (1 Teaspoon Small Hand Foods Grenadine).

Similar to the Albemarle Fizz, but with Grenadine instead of Raspberry Syrup. I have to admit, as much as I like Small Hand Foods Grenadine, there was something just a bit nicer about the Albemarle. Maybe the fragrance of the Raspberries? Grenadine makes a drink that is just a tad leaner than one made with Raspberry Syrup.

The music in the video is from a new CD by The Thing with Jim O’Rourke called, “Shinjuku Growl”.

Fusilli with Kabocha Squash, small tomatoes, Snap Peas, and corn. AKA leftovers pasta. Really tasty, all the same.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Oh Harry! Cocktail

Oh Harry! Cocktail
Saturate 1 lump of Sugar with Raspberry Syrup or Grenadine. (sugar cube saturated with Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1/3 Vermouth. (Dolin Blanc Vermouth)
2/3 Hooch Whisky. (Buffalo Trace Unaged Whiskey)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I needed to pick up something from Slanted Door this last Friday, so I thought I would take the chance to annoy the bar staff there, with a particularly annoying Savoy recipe.

“Hooch Whiskey”? What is that? The recipe doesn’t say what sort of vermouth. Doesn’t even really tell you what to do with the sugar cube, or the point of saturating it with syrup.

Fortunately, Jennifer Colliau, of Small Hand Foods was behind the bar and said, “What if we use Blanc Vermouth and just make this a “White Man” with a sugar cube?”

I dunno, as much as I like White Manhattans, this didn’t quite work. A bitters soaked cube would have made a lot more sense, or as Jennifer pointed out, some sort of sparkling wine to act upon the cube and circulate the flavors.

Maybe if we had muddled the cube into the drink?

I dunno, I still think even then the “Oh Harry!” doesn’t quite live up to its name.

It’s definitely no, “Oh sweet mystery of life, I have found you,” type of drink.

But maybe, you took what you could get during prohibition.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Parson’s Special Cocktail

One thing that I’m hoping to do this year is to get out a bit more to bars around town. While I’m at it, I plan to, ahem, challenge the talent a bit more than I have, by requesting that they make Savoy Cocktails.

For this outing, we met some friends in North Beach where we decided to have dinner at the new-ish Comstock Saloon. Well, it’s really only “new-ish” if you get out to North Beach as infrequently as Mrs. Flannestad and I do. Ahem, I think they’ve been open for at least 8 months.

Among the bars and restaurants that opened last year, a new trend was bars that take themselves seriously as cocktail destinations, yet have really very decent food. Both Bar Agricole and Comstock Saloon fall into this category. Where previously it had almost seemed that it was the restaurants which were leading the charge as destinations for amazing cocktails, now we are seeing places that are first and foremost cocktail destinations, yet are being written up also as food destinations.

That it incorporates “Saloon” in its name and is located in North Beach, gives you a good idea what to expect. Located in the space which was most recently the San Francisco Brewing Company, Comstock is a rowdy, fun bar with live music and weekend crowds. That you can also get “Beef Shank and Bone Marrow Pot Pie” or “Chicken Fried Rabbit” is an indication of where “Bar Food” is at these days in San Francisco. I’m all for it, especially when the food is priced as well as it is at Comstock.

Parson’s Special Cocktail
4 Dashes Grenadine.
1 Glass Orange Juice.
The Yolk of 1 Egg.
Shake well and strain into medium size glass.

For my first drink, to be a pain in the ass. I asked for “Barkeep’s Whismy” and specified “something brown”. I got back a very well made Brooklyn, one of my all time favorite drinks, and quite enjoyed it. As far as “Whimsy” goes, maybe a bit on the “safe” side, but hard to complain.

As I was perusing the menu, I noticed they had the new beer from Anchor Brewing, Brekel’s Brown. It proved to be a great companion to my Beef Shank and Bone Marrow Pot Pie.

After we finished dinner, the server asked us if there was anything else she could bring. I wrote down the recipe for the Parson’s Special and told her it was for a blog project I was working on.

A well executed drink came back, with the spice from their house Grenadine giving this rather plain recipe a well needed lift. Quite similar to what I remember an Orange Julius tasting like, I’m not sure I would order the Parson’s Special again, but I know I will return to Comstock Saloon to sample more of their food and drink menu.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Keep Sober Cocktail

Keep Sober Cocktail

1/8 Grenadine. (Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1/8 Sirop-de-Citron (Sirop-de-Citron, homemade)
3/4 Tonic. (Clayton’s Kola Tonic)

Serve in long glass and fill with siphon soda.

This one isn’t bad either, ending up tasting rather like a Cherry-Coke, though it wouldn’t be awful to include a little citrus.

Another interesting experiment I tried was mixing in Trader Tiki’s Don’s Mix, instead of the Grenadine. You know, you have to support your friends. Anyway, I found that to be a quite interesting variation, a little spice and a little citric tang, gave this a bit more of a tropical theme and made it a pretty decent non-alcoholic cocktail.

Now if I could only convince Blair from Trader Tiki or Jennifer from Small Hand Foods to make a Kola Tonic, so I don’t have to order it from Barbados next time!

I mean, if you have to Keep Sober, it doesn’t mean you have to suffer.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.