Ward’s Cocktail

First, just a reminder that Sunday, November 28th, 2010, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders (and me) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Ward’s Cocktail
1/2 Liqueur Glass Chartreuse. (3/4 oz Green Chartreuse)
1/2 Brandy. (1 oz Chateau Pellehaut Armagnac)

Use cocktail glass. 1 piece of Peel in glass to form a circle. Fill with cracked ice. Pour the liquors very carefully so that they do not mix. Brandy must be poured in last.

I interpreted “Peel” to mean a Lemon Peel, as in a Crusta, and lined the glass with a horse’s neck of lemon.

This was OK, but I think my ice was not fine enough.

I used my swing-a-way ice crusher, which makes what might be called “pebble ice”. I think for this type of drink, or for juleps, this really isn’t adequate. You really need fine or shaved ice to do some of these drinks justice.

I mean, who doesn’t want a Green Chartreuse and Brandy Snow Cone?

If you say, “I will pass, thanks,” we may have irreconcilable differences.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Union Jack Cocktail

Union Jack
1/3 Grenadine. (1/4 oz Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1/3 Maraschino. (1/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
1/2 Green Chartreuse. (1/4 oz Green Chartreuse)
Use liqueur glass and pour ingredients carefully so that they do not mix.

Stupid battery still being a bit flaky. I’ve ordered some more, but will be taking the odd post with digital for the time being. If I can remember how.

I guess you should try to feel a bit patriotic about this one, but it’s not even blue, white and red. I guess there were no blue liqueurs at the time, as the book often calls for blue vegetable coloring.

Anyway, there’s nothing special here, as far as taste goes. As much as I enjoy Small Hand Foods Grenadine, I just can’t quite bring myself to drink it straight as more than a taste. I sucked the green chartreuse off the top of this one and tossed the rest down the drain after taking the photo.

Can anyone spot the brand on Mrs. Flannestad’s commemorative shot glass? I was hoping it would be more obvious.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Tipperary Cocktail (No. 1)

Tipperary Cocktail (No. 1)
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 oz Carpano Antica)
1/3 Green Chartreuse. (1/2 oz Green Chartreuse)
1/3 Irish Whisky. (1 oz Bushmill’s 10 Year Single Malt, 1/4 oz Gordon & MacPhail Highland Park 8 Year)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

The other day I was picking up some supplies at Cask Store, chatting with my favorite Amandas, when another customer picked up the business card from Cask’s sister bar Rickhouse.  On the back of the card is the recipe for Owen Westman’s cocktail The Laphroig Project.

The Laphroaig Project:
1oz Green Chartreuse
.5oz Laphroaig Quarter Cask
.5oz Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur
.25oz Yellow Chartreuse
1oz Fresh Lemon Juice
2 Dashes Fee Peach Btters

Combine all ingredients into mixing tin and shake vigorously. Double-strain over fresh ice in a double old-fashioned glass. Garnish with a lemon twist and enjoy.

The customer’s jaw dropped, “What? They are using Single Malt Scotch in a Cocktail!? That is just so wrong!!!”

As if the only proper use for an Islay Malt is to pour it reverently into a glass, with maybe a bit of water freshly dipped from a stream in Scotland, and savor it on its own.

While I do believe there is often a point of diminishing returns with using excessively expensive products in Cocktails, using a half an ounce of Laphroig in a cocktail isn’t going to cause the world to end.  No Scotsmen were harmed in the production of the Laphroaig Project.

When I got to the Tipperary Cocktail, I had a couple problems.

Like the recipes for the Opera, The Widow’s Kiss, and the Jewel, equal parts of booze, vermouth, and liqueur is just a bit too rich for me.  I needed to dry this out a bit, and allow the whiskey to shine, before I could start to enjoy it.

My other problem was I am supremely unimpressed with most Irish Whiskey in mixed drinks, especially this one, Bushmill’s Single Malt 10 Year.  As far as I can tell, you might as well be adding vaguely malt flavored water, for all it contributes to most mixed drinks.  Clearly it is not a “mixing whiskey”.

Thinking about what to use to “punch up” the Bushmill’s, I cast my gaze about the basement booze supply. American Whiskey? I think they would over shadow whatever pale character existed in the Irish. Other spirits? Again, hard to think of something that would get along and not run it over. What about Scotch? Hm, there is even a Peated Irish Whiskey, maybe Scotch wouldn’t be too much of a stretch…

So let’s fix it, and piss off some Scotch Whiskey Nerds at the same time.

But what Scotch? It would have to be something not too crazy and over the top in it’s Peaty Smokiness.

How about Highland Scotch? It tends towards the characters I like in Single Malt Scotch, without overwhelming with extremes of Peat and Smoke. Honing in further, I really like Highland Park‘s Whiskies, which are technically from Orkney. (I’ll make a Tipperary for anyone who can identify the source of following quote without resorting to google, “Snow storms forecast imminently in areas Dogger, Viking, Moray, Forth, and Orkney.”) Normally, I keep the Highland Park 12 Year Old around the house, but this Gordon and MacPhail Highland Park 8 Year is a new favorite. Introduced to me by David Driscoll, the Spirits buyer at K&L Wines, there is a lot of the same character you find in the 12, but it has a little bit more youthful punch. It is also a fantastic deal for the money.

Second, I decided, instead of an equal parts cocktail, we’d make it a 2-1-1 version.  That isn’t far from some of my favorite Manhattan Variations, so it seemed a safe bet.

And damn, if that isn’t tasty!  Hit this one exactly in my aromatic cocktail sweet spot.  Lightening the Vermouth and Liqueur changes this from an after dinner candy, to a digestiv.  The added interest of the Scotch brings both whiskies to life.

Give it a try with the Highland Park, or another Scotch Whisky, and let me know what you think.  Don’t be afraid to piss off some Scotsmen or the Irish.  Though we might have to call it “Tipperary Cocktail (No. 3)”.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Stars and Stripes Cocktail

Stars and Stripes
1/3 Crème de Cassis. (1/2 oz Brizard Cassis)
1/3 Maraschino. (1/2 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
1/3 Green Chartreuse. (1/2 oz Green Chartreuse)
Use liqueur glass and pour carefully so that ingredients do not mix.

My favorite Chartreuse story happened one Savoy Night at Alembic.

A few New York bartenders were in town and stopped by to celebrate the birthday of a local bartender. One of the gentlemen who stopped by was Mr. Toby Maloney. Mr. Maloney took it as his prerogative to attempt to drink us out of Cynar, one glass at a time. However, later in the evening, as he was talking to a young lady at the end of the bar, he discovered she had not, thus far in her life, experienced the joys of Green Chartreuse. A situation he felt should be rectified immediately. I grabbed the bottle of Chartreuse from the back bar and poured the young lady a shot. When I brought it over, Toby gave me a look and asked where our shots were, because surely a lady should not drink alone. Goddamn! While I agree young women should not drink alone, I was going to have to drink a shot of 110 proof Green Chartreuse! Back to the backbar, grab the chartreuse, pour two more shots. As I was bringing the shots of Chartreuse back to Toby, Daniel Hyatt noticed and asked me what we were drinking. I handed him a glass, he took a sniff, growled, “Psychopaths!” and handed back the glass. We did run out of Cynar before the night’s end.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Spring Feeling Cocktail

Spring Feeling Cocktail
1/4 Lemon Juice. (1/2 oz Lemon Juice)
1/4 Green Chartreuse. (1/2 oz Green Chartreuse)
1/2 Plymouth Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I knew when I read this recipe that it would be something that Mrs. Flannestad would be particularly taken with. In fact she liked it so much that we blew threw the nearly empty Green Chartreuse bottle in no time. She has promised to buy another, as I primarily use it for her favorite cocktails, The Last Word and now Spring Feeling.

Well, that’s not entirely true, I do often use it for Manhattan variations I myself enjoy. But volume-wise, we go through a lot more in her cocktails.

I mentioned this cocktail to a couple bartender friends, and they usually said, “Oh, like a Last Word…” Well, it is a bit like a Last Word in that it involves Gin, Green Chartreuse, and Citrus. However, it is a much, much drier cocktail, being half Plymouth Gin and equal parts Lemon and Green Chartreuse.

In fact, I think I kind of like it a bit more than the traditional equal parts Last Word Cocktail.

Well, you may, or you might not. But it is a fun cocktail to order, with that great name. “I’d like a Spring Feeling, please.”

Memorize the proportions, and give it a try the next time you are out.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Shamrock Cocktail

017

Shamrock Cocktail
3 Dashes Green Crème de Menthe. (5ml Brizard White Creme de Menthe)
3 Dashes Green Chartreuse. (5ml Green Chartreuse)
1/2 French Vermouth. (1 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)
1/2 Irish Whisky. (1 oz Bushmill’s Single Malt 10 Year)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Departures: First, I don’t have Green Creme de Menthe, and sorry, I’m not about to buy any. It tastes the same as the White, it’s just green, due to added artificial color. Second, I’m undersizing these dashes. Previously, I was holding out at 2.5ml for fluid dashes, but I know, with that 7.5ml Creme de Menthe, this would just taste like mouthwash.

And in fact, this does just taste like Mouthwash, as it is. There’s probably a much better drink here with 7.5ml Green Chartreuse and a wash of creme de menthe. Heck, a spanked mint sprig would be plenty of mint for this drink, and it would come by its green color naturally.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sand-Martin Cocktail

004

Sand-Martin Cocktail
1 Teaspoonful Green Chartreuse. (1 Teaspoonful of Yellow Chartreuse)
1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Carpano Antica Italian Vermouth)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Beefeater Gin)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

In his pre-prohibition book “Cocktails: How to Mix Them,” Robert Vermeire notes regarding the “San Martin Cocktail”, “This well known South American drink must be well shaken. It contains no Bitters of any description, but: ½ gill of Gin; ½ gill of Italian Vermouth; 1 teaspoonful of Yellow Chartreuse; A little lemon peel is squeezed on top.”

Odd that Vermeire specifies the “San Martin” must be “well shaken”.

San Martin or Sand-Martin, I guess since this doesn’t have bitters, it really isn’t really a Martinez variation. More of a “Lone Tree” variation, I suppose. Well, however you decide to classify it, it is quite tasty, whether you make it with yellow or green chartreuse. Though I kind of lean towards yellow.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

St. Germain Cocktail

019

St. Germain Cocktail.
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
The Juice of 1/4 Grapefruit.
The White or 1 Egg.
1 Liqueur Glass Green Chartreuse. (1 1/2 oz Green Chartreuse)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Woo! On to the “S” Cocktails! I may actually finish this damn Stomp Through the Savoy Cocktail Book, afterall!

The odd thing about the St. Germain cocktail, is the Green Chartreuse is so high proof that it really doesn’t get much foam. The egg white contributes body, but very little else.

If you like Green Chartreuse, this is a nice sour. If you don’t like Green Chartreuse, this may not be a cocktail for you. It’s no Last Word, not a cocktail to convert anyone.

Tasty, though.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Rainbow Cocktail

Rainbow Cocktail

Rainbow Cocktail.
1/7 Crème de Cacao. (1/4 oz Mozart Black Chocolate Liqueur)
1/7 Crème de Violette. (1/4 oz Rothman & Winter Violette)
1/7 Yellow Chartreuse. (1/4 oz Yellow Chartreuse)
1/7 Maraschino. (1/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
1/7 Benedictine. (1/4 oz Benedictine)
1/7 Green Chartreuse. (1/4 oz Green Chartreuse)
1/7 Brandy. (1/4 oz Chateau de Pellehaut Reserve Armagnac)
Use liqueur glass and pour ingredients carefully so that they do not mix.

For those of you keeping track, the ingredients arranged themselves in the following order, bottom to top: Mozart Black, Luxardo Maraschino, Benedictine/YellowChartreuse, R&W Violette, Green Chartreuse, Brandy.

Every once in a while someone orders this during Savoy Cocktail Nights at Alembic Bar and we all groan. Why, oh why?

It’s true these are all perfectly palatable liqueurs, but this is just such a pain in the ass to concoct.  And the whole thing together, while not entirely unpleasant, is a bit of a shock to the system, if you are sensitive to sugar.

I finished it, it is true, more out of curiosity than anything else.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

“Everybody’s Irish” Cocktail

“Everybody’s Irish” Cocktail

3 Dashes Green Mint. (1/2 tsp. Brizard Creme de Menthe)
6 Dashes Green Chartreuse. (1 tsp. Green Chartreuse)
Irish Whiskey. (2 oz Red Breast Irish Whiskey)

(Stir well with ice, strain into a cocktail glass and…) Add a Green olive.

Created to mark, and now in great demand on, St. Patrick’s Day. The green olive suspended in the liquid, looks like a gibbous moon.

It isn’t quite as “green” as it should be. I don’t have green Creme de Menthe so just used the plain white.

However, all in all, a tasty (and quite potent) cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.