Whisky Daisy

Here’s the Savoy Cocktail Book’s Whiskey Daisy:

Whisky Daisy.
Use small bar glass.
3 Dashes Gomme Syrup.
The Juice of 1/2 Small Lemon.
1 Wineglass Bourbon or Rye Whisky.
Fill glass 1/3 full of shaved ice.
Shake thoroughly, strain into a large cocktail glass, and fill up with Apollinaris or Seltzer Water.

Well, OK, but here’s my adaption:

Flannestad Whiskey Daisy.

1/4 oz Rich Simple Syrup;
Juice 1/2 Lemon;
2 oz Hudson Four Grain Bourbon;

Peel half a lemon as for an apple, and place in a cocktail glass. Shake thoroughly on cracked ice and strain over fresh ice in the glass. Garnish with fresh fruit, in season, and fill with soda water.

One of the biggish questions about the Daisy family of drinks is whether or not the ice should be included in the final drink. In the Savoy recipes for the Gin and Santa Cruz Rum Daisies, it seemed like the drinks should either be built over crushed ice or shaken and strained over new crushed ice.

As you’ll recall, in his 1914 book, Hugo Ensslin described the Daisy as follows:

All…Daisies are made as follows: Juice of ½ Lime and ¼ Lemon; 1 teaspoonful of Powdered Sugar; 2 dashes of Grenadine; 1 drink of liquor desired; 2 dashes Carbonated water. Use silver mug, put in the above ingredients, fill up with fine ice, stir until mug is frosted, decorate with fruit and sprays of fresh mint and serve with straws.

Which sounds, more or less, like a Julep with some Citrus in it.

However, when we get to the “Whisky Daisy” we find this is not the case, picture above to the contrary.

So I thought I would check some other early cocktail books and see how they advised the construction of the Daisy.

First off, I will note, that there are no recipes for Daisies in the original 1862 edition of Jerry Thomas’ Bartender’s Guide.

However, in the 1900 edition of Harry Johnson’s “New and Improved (Illustrated) Bartenders’ Manual and a Guide for Hotels and Restaurants”, he includes the following recipe for a Whiskey Daisy:

Whiskey Daisy.
(Use a large bar glass.)
1/2 table-spoonful of sugar;
2 or 3 dashes of lemon juice;
1 dash of lime juice;
1 squirt of syphon, vichy, or selters; dissolve with the lemon and lime juice;
3/4 of the glass filled with fine shaved ice;
1 wine-glass of good whiskey;
Fill the glass with shaved ice;
1/2 pony-glass chartreuse (yellow).

Stir up well with a spoon; then take a fancy glass, have it dressed with fruits in season, and strain the mixture into it and serve.
This drink is very palatable and will taste good to almost anybody (see illustration, plate No. 10).

Unfortunately, here we see Mr. Johnson is fairly clear that the Whiskey Daisy’s ingredients are stirred and then strained into another glass.

He even goes so far as to present an illustration with the drink on ice ready to be strained and the glass prepared for the drink to be strained into:

The 1908 edition of Cocktail Bill Boothby’s “The World’s Drinks and How to Mix Them” also agrees with Mr. Johnson, his drink is shaken and strained into another glass.

Brandy Daisy.

Half fill a medium-sized mixing-glass with cracked ice, add the juice of one lemon, three dashes of orange cordial and a jigger of brandy. Shake, strain into a punch-glass, fill up with siphon seltzer and serve.

One of the questions I’ve always had, though, is where the 19th Century drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book come from. They don’t appear to be Johnson, nor do they appear to be Boothby. And there are drinks in it, which aren’t in the original edition of Jerry Thomas.

However, around 1928, Herbert Ashbury edited and published an expanded version of Jerry Thomas’ guide, complete with many of the stories and legends about Mr. Thomas, which we would also later come to think of as fact.

I personally suspect that this rather high profile reprint of the book, perhaps half remembered, is the basis for the 19th Century-ish drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book.

The recipes are still not exactly the same as the Savoy Cocktail Book, but it does include a Santa Cruz Rum Daisy, a (Holland!) Gin Daisy, and a Whiskey Daisy.

Whiskey Daisy
Use small bar glass.
Three dashes gum syrup.
Two dashes orgeat syrup.
The juice of half a small lemon.
One wineglass of Bourbon or rye whiskey.

Fill glass one-third full of shaved ice.

Shake thoroughly, strain into a large cocktail glass, and fill up with Apollinaris or selzer water.

Well, using orgeat, instead of the more typical Maraschino is a bit odd, but it does underscore the odd seemingly random nature of the sweeteners used in the Daisy family. I think it’s best not to get too strict about the sweeteners in a Daisy. Feel like using Orgeat to sweeten your Daisy? Why not? Jerry Thomas did.

But anyway, other than the addition of the Orgeat in the 1928 Thomas, the Savoy recipe is verbatim from Thomas, down to the usage, ingredients, and measures.

But what about the ice? Unfortunately, for me, since I sort of prefer these drinks on cracked ice, it appears that almost all of the early recipes I can find for Daisies are shaken, or stirred, on ice and then strained into another glass.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Santa Cruz Rum Daisy

Santa Cruz Rum Daisy

Use small bar glass.
3 or 4 Dashes Gomme Syrup. (1/4 oz Rich Simple Syrup)
2 or 3 Dashes Maraschino or Curacao. (1/4 oz Maraschino Liqueur)
The Juice of 1/2 Small Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lemon, Juice 1/2 Small Lime)
1 Wineglass Santa Cruz Rum. (2 oz Cruzan Single Barrel Rum)

Fill glass 1/3 full of shaved ice. Shake thoroughly, strain into a large cocktail glass, and fill up with Appollinaris or Selzer Water.

Figured I should use Rum which was actually from Saint Croix for the Santa Cruz Rum Daisy.

As usual, I find Cruzan Single Barrel to be fairly non-descript in this cocktail.

It’s a very fine Rum, but it doesn’t have enough “oomph” to stand up to this amount of ice, citrus, and sweetener.

Now, an Agricole or Navy Rum Daisy would be something to write home about…

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Tom Collins Whisky

First, just a reminder that Sunday, May 22, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails, (they also have a great beer selection,) on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders, (and me,) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Tom Collins Whisky
5 or 6 Dashes of Gomme Syrup. (1/4 oz Rich Simple Syrup)
The Juice of 1 Small Lemon. (3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1 Large Wineglass Whisky. (2 oz Buffalo Trace Bourbon)
2 or 3 Lumps of Ice.
Use small bar glass.
Shake well and strain into a large bar glass (12 oz Schumann Glass, over a single large cube of ice). Fill up the glass with plain soda water and imbibe while it is lively.

Aside from the “Prepared Punches for Bottling”, The Collins family is another section in the 1887 Jerry Thomas, which was not in the original 1862 edition of the book.

Reproduced below, you can see that the Savoy editors lifted the Tom Collins Whisky directly from that edition, including the charming, “imbibe while it is lively.”

Tom Collins Whiskey.
(Use small bar-glass.)
Take 5 or 6 dashes of gum syrup.
Juice of a small lemon.
1 large wine-glass of whiskey.
2 or 3 lumps of ice.

Shake up well and strain into a large bar-glass. Fill up the glass with plain soda water and imbibe while it is lively.

Tom Collins Brandy.
(Use large bar-glass.)
The same as Tom Collins Whiskey, substituting brandy for whiskey.

Tom Collins Gin.
(Use large bar-glass.)
The same as Tom Collins Whiskey, substituting gin for whiskey.

Normally, modern bartenders will differentiate between the various Collins drinks by giving them different first names. Jose Collins is Tequila, Jack Collins is AppleJack, Michael Collins is Irish Whiskey, and so forth. Apparently at this early date, these names had not yet been codified and everything was just a Tom Collins with the spirit specified after.

Second point, even though these early versions of the Tom Collins were being made with sugar syrup, they were still being shaken.

The two glasses thing in the Savoy recipe is always a bit confusing, but in the Thomas recipe, it is a bit more clear that one is specifying the mixing glass (small) and the other the serving glass (large).

Another interesting point is that normally you’d write out the main recipe and then say, something like “made the same with Gin” for the variations. So in the case of Thomas, it seems like the Tom Collins Whiskey was the dominant drink, not the Tom Collins Gin (which would have been Genever, at that time).

Lastly, it doesn’t appear that Jerry Thomas is specifying that any ice be included in the serving glass of the Tom Collins Whiskey. I took the liberty of adding a big tovolo cube to my drink, as I prefer it that way, but it appears at that early date, even ice was optional. The only difference between a “Whisky Fiz” and a “Tom Collins Whisky” was the size of the serving glass and thus the amount of soda.

As far as the drink itself, as much as I like Whiskey, I didn’t find it as enjoyable as the Gin Tom Collins I had at Bar Agricole. Aged spirits and Lemon, especially Bourbon, I just don’t find as appealing in Citrus based drinks. Highballs, I don’t mind at all, but once you add that lemon, you usually lose me. Guess I should try it with some unaged Whisk(e)y!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Brandy Cocktail (Another Recipe) for Bottling

First, just a reminder that Sunday, March 27, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders (and me) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Huh, this Brandy Cocktail sounds interesting, what with the tincture of licorice and all…

Kinda Sazerac-ish!

Brandy Cocktail (Another Recipe) for Bottling
5 gallon Brandy.
2 Gallons Water.
1 Quart Gomme Syrup.
1/4 Pint Essence of Cognac.
1 Ounce Tincture of Cloves.
1 Ounce Tincture of Gentian.
2 Ounces Tincture of Orange Peel.
1/4 Ounce Tincture of Cardamoms.
1/2 Ounce Tincture of Liquorice Root.
Mix the essence and tinctures with a portion of the spirits; add the remainder of the ingredients, and colour with a sufficient quantity of Solferino and caramel (in equal parts) to give the Desired color.

Sure I can’t get anyone to sponsor these experiments? Someone with A LOT of friends?

I will note that all of these cocktails come, more or less, verbatim from the 1887 version of Jerry Thomas’ Bartender’s Guide that Darcy has up over at Art of Drink:

Cocktails for Bottling

For example:

Brandy Cocktail for Bottling.
Take 5 gallons of spirits (70 per cent.).
2 gallons of water.
1 quart of gum syrup.
¼ pint of essence of Cognac.
1 ounce of tincture of cloves.
1 ounce of tincture of gentian.
2 ounces of tincture of orange peel.
¼ ounce of tincture of cardamoms.
½ ounce of tincture of liquorice root.

Mix the essence and tinctures with a portion of the
spirits; add the remainder of the ingredients, and
color with a sufficient quantity of Solferino and caramel
(in equal parts) to give the desired color.

However, they do not seem to be in the 1862 edition of his book, as published by Mud Puddle Books.

On to “Non-Alcoholic Cocktails”!

Brandy Cocktail for Bottling

First, just a reminder that Sunday, March 27, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders (and me) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Another batched cocktail for bottling, this one with Brandy.

Brandy Cocktail for Bottling
5 Gallons Strong Brandy.
2 Gallons Water.
1 Quart Bitters.
1 Quart Gomme Syrup.
1 Bottle Curacao.
Mix thoroughly, and filter through Canton flannel.

Mmm, flannel filtered! Even plainer than the previous Bourbon Cocktail, get out your quart bottles of Angostura.

This recipe comes verbatim from the version of Jerry Thomas’ Bartender’s Guide that Darcy has up over on Art of Drink. This recipe was originally as follows:

Brandy Cocktail for Bottling.
Take 5 gallons of strong brandy.
2 gallons of water.
1 quart of Stoughton’s Bitters.
1 quart of gum syrup.
1 bottle of Curacoa.

Mix thoroughly, and filter through Canton flannel.

Bourbon Cocktail for Bottling

First, just a reminder that Sunday, March 27, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders (and me) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Bourbon Cocktail for Bottling
5 Gallons Bourbon Rye Whisky.
2 Gallons Water.
1 Quart Gomme Syrup.
2 Ounces Tincture of Orange Peel.
1 Ounce Tincture of Lemon Peel.
1 Ounce Tincture Gentian.
1/2 Ounce Tincture of Cardamoms.
Mix these ingredients thoroughly and colour with Solferino and caramel, in equal proportions.

Gotta get me some of that “Bourbon Rye Whiskey”!

All the same, kind of plain, I’d say.

This recipe comes, more or less, verbatim from the version of Jerry Thomas’ Bartender’s Guide which Darcy has up over on Art of Drink:

Bourbon Cocktail for Bottling.
Take 5 gallons of Bourbon.
2 gallons of water.
1 quart of gum syrup.
2 ounces of tincture of orange peel.
1 ounce of tincture of lemon peel.
1 ounce of tincture of gentian.
½ ounce of tincture of cardamoms.

Mix these ingredients thoroughly, and color with
Solferino and caramel, in equal proportions.

Gin Cocktail For Bottling

First, just a reminder that Sunday, March 27, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders (and me) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Prepared Cocktails for Bottling.

I’m going to skip ahead to the next section, while I finish getting the Zed in order.

Unfortunately, I’m not going to make any of these cocktails, the batches are just too large and the amounts too weird.

If there are any bars or spirits reps who might want to work with me to give these a try, let me know. Until then I will wait for the grant for “Advanced Alcoholic Studies” to roll in.

Gin Cocktail for Bottling
5 Gallons Gin.
2 Gallons Water.
1 Quart Gomme Syrup.
2 Ounces Tincture of Orange Peel.
7 Ounces Tincture of Gentian.
1/2 Ounce Tincture of Cardamoms.
1/2 Ounce Tincture of Lemon Peel.
Mix together, and give the desired colour with Solferino and caramel, in equal proportion.

This recipe comes verbatim from the version of Jerry Thomas’ Bartender’s Guide which Dary has up over on Art of Drink.

Gin Cocktail for Bottling.
Take 5 gallons of gin.
2 gallons of water.
1 quart of gum syrup.
2 ounces of tincture of orange peeL
7 ounces of tincture of gentian.
½ ounce of tincture of cardamoms.
½ ounce of tincture of lemon peel.

Mix them together, and give the desired color with
Solferino and caramel, in equal proportions.

Zazarac Cocktail

Wow, this cocktail, and one more and a major portion of this project completed.

Oh, wait, I will have to change the footer, if I am going to continue on after the Zed…

Zazarac Cocktail
1/6 Bacardi Rum. (1/2 oz 3/4 oz Barbancourt 8 Year)
1/6 Anisette. (1/2 oz 3/4 oz Anis del Mono dulce)
1/6 Gomme Syrup. (1/2 oz 3/4 oz Mesquite Bean Syrup)
1/3 Canadian Club Whisky. (1/3 oz Rittenhouse Bonded)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters. (1 dash Angostura Bitters)
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (1 dash Regan’s Orange Bitters)
3 Dashes Absinthe. (3 dash Absinthe)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

Out of Small Hand Foods Gum Syrup, so instead substituting Mesquite Bean Syrup, which is made by extracting the juice from the mesquite bean pods that grow abundantly in the deserts of the southwestern United States.

As usual, in cocktails sourced from Harry McElhone’s 1928 “ABC of Cocktails”, that Harry Calls for Rye Whiskey instead of the Savoy Cocktail Book’s Canadian Club.

Such a long ingredient list, you just sort of wonder what was going on in the head of the person who threw all this together. Had they had a Sazerac many years ago and were attempting to recreate the flavor with ingredients they had at hand?

There is an interesting and somewhat unexpected spiciness, reminiscent of fruitcake. Still, there is no way this is anything other than way too sweet, even well stirred.

Spatchcock that chicken.

Really, I just like to say, “Spatchcock”. It’s probably a character flaw.

But it really is an awesome way to flatten out a chicken and roast it evenly. Works for Turkeys too!

The Roast Chicken with bread salad from Zuni Cafe, no matter how literally you take Judy Rodgers’ crazily detailed instructions, is a truly awesome presentation. One of the best dishes from that generation of chefs. Roast a chicken. Then deglaze your pan with wine and a little vinegar. Adjust seasonings. Fill a bowl with bitter greens, like Arugula, add some freshly toasted croutons. Pour the warm dressing over the greens and croutons and toss to combine. Serve your roast chicken pieces on top. So tasty!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Thunder Cocktail

First, just a reminder that this Sunday, August 29, 2010, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders (and me) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Thunder Cocktail
1 Teaspoonful Gomme Syrup. (1 Teaspoon Small Hands Food Gum Syrup)
The Yolk of 1 Egg. (The Yolk of 1 Egg)
1 Glass Brandy. (2 oz Chateau Pellehaut Armagnac Reserve)
1 Sprinkle of Cayenne Pepper (1 Sprinkle S&B Nanami Togarashi)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Well, that’s a bit odd, a Brandy Flip with Cayenne? I guess this would have been some sort of morning Pick-Me-Up.

Chuckle, well, why not use this interesting Japanese Pepper blend? Sure, it has Seaweed and Black Sesame Seeds, but what the heck? A little Umami never killed anyone.

It’s not a drink I will likely make again soon, but neither is it bad. Other than heat, the spice blend doesn’t contribute a lot to the cocktail, but it is enough to be noticeable.

A spicy flip? Why not?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Nineteen-Twenty Pick-Me-Up Cocktail

Nineteen-Twenty Pick-Me-Up

Nineteen-Twenty Pick-Me-Up Cocktail

2/3 Pernod Absinthe. (1 1/2 oz Henri Bardouin Pastis)
1/3 Gin. (3/4 oz Beefeater’s Gin)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (1 dash Angostura Orange Bitters)
1 Dash Gomme Syrup. (1/3 tsp. Rich Simple Syrup)

Shake well, strain into medium size wine-glass, and fill balance with soda water.

We’ve discussed “Absinthe” quite a bit previously, most recently on the Nine Pick and Monkey Gland Cocktails.

The question here is, “What would this cocktail have been made with? True Absinthe or a Wormwood free substitute like Pernod or Ricard?”

As we noted before, Absinthe was banned in most countries between 1910 and 1915. Therefore, in pretty much any cocktail recipe which dates from 1920 through to 2006 and calls for “Absinthe”, the author really means Pernod or Ricard.

Fortunately, in the case of this cocktail it is an easy call. The name suggests it is from 1920 and it uses the term “Pernod Absinthe” in the recipe. 1920 was the year France once again allowed anise flavored liqueurs to be manufactured and sold. Pernod et fils was one of the first out of the gate with a wormwood-free reformulation of its Absinthe.

So, yeah, this recipe should be made with a Wormwood-free anise flavored liqueur.

I’m using Henri Bardouin Pastis, which is one of my favorite Wormwood-free Anise flavored beverages. It’s a bit less sweet and more complex than Pernod, Herbsaint, or Ricard. The only downside to using Bardouin Pastis in cocktails is that some of the flavoring oils have a tendency to drop out of solution when it is shaken with ice and chilled rapidly. It’s still tasty, but the oils float to the top and form an ugly white film.

The big difference between Absinthe and most of the Wormwood-free substitutes, aside from the lack of Artemesia absinthium in the botanicals, is the presence of sugar in the product.

When making an Absinthe drip, most people add at least some sugar. When Pernod et fils developed their new products post-ban, it seems like they made a conscious decision to make the Absinthe ritual simpler. They added sugar to the products in the bottle. So instead of dripping water over sugar into the Absinthe, all you had to do was add water.

You can make this cocktail with Absinthe or with a Wormwood-free substitute. Simply take into consideration the lack of sugar in the Absinthe and go a bit heavier on the Sugar Syrup.

For some reason, maybe it’s the large portion of Absinthe, someone inevitably orders one of these every time we do Savoy Cocktail Book night at Alembic Bar.  It’s hard to mind too much, as the soda sort of mitigates the large portion of spirits.  Anyway, if you like Absinthe, it’s actually quite a pleasant drink to sip on a hot day.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.