Little Los Angeles Fizz

One of our regular guests dropped in and asked for something “Whiskey, bitter, and sour.” She reminded me, I had last made her the often unjustly ignored Los Angeles Cocktail.

Thinking of something along those lines, I improvised the following, an unholy, and unlikely, ménage à trois between a Cynar Fizz, The Little Italy, and the Los Angeles Cocktail.

Little Los Angeles Fizz

3/4 oz Cynar
3/4 oz Punt e Mes
3/4 oz Bonded Bourbon
3/4 oz Lemon Juice
1/2 oz Simple Syrup (or to taste)
3/4 oz Egg White
Soda Water

Briefly shake vigorously without ice. Add ice and shake until well chilled. Strain half mixed drink into fizz glass. Add splash soda to remaining unstrained mixture and strain on top of drink. Squeeze lemon peel over drink and discard.

I delivered the cocktail with a comment that is was, “A Los Angeles Cocktail turned up to 11.”

…Where Angels Fear to Tread.

Angostura Fizz

In his book, “The Gentleman’s Companion,” Charles Baker includes a drink called an Angostura Fizz.

THE ANGOSTURA FIZZ, sometimes Called the Trinidad Fizz, Being a Receipt Gleaned from One of Our Friends Piloting the Big Brazilian Clipper from Here to Trinidad & Rio & on South to “B.A.”

This mild fizz is again like the initial olive sampling; either it suits or it doesn’t, and subsequent trials often show sudden shift to appreciation. It is a well-known stomachic along the humid shores of Trinidad, in British Guiana; wherever the climate is hot and the humidity high, and stomachs stage sit-down strikes and view all thought of food–present or future–with entire lack of enthusiasm. Further than this, the cinchona bark elixir in the Angostura, the other herbs and valuable simples, are a definite first line defense against malaria and other amoebic fevers–especially in warding off their after effect in later months when all actual peril is past.

Take 1 pony of Angostura Bitters, add 1 tsp of sugar or grenadine, the juice of 1/2 lemon or 1 lime, the white of 1 egg, and 1 tbsp of thick cream–or slightly less. Shake with cracked ice like a cocktail, turn into a goblet and fill to suit individual taste with club soda, seltzer, vichy, or whatever lures the mind. Vary the sweet also, to suit taste. It is a very original, cooling drink as well as a valuable tonic to those dwelling in hot countries. Garnish with sticks of ripe fresh pineapple, always.

Uh, right, Baker at his verbose best, how about this for some less romantic simplification:

Angostura Fizz

1 pony Angostura Bitters (Baker’s “Pony” is an ounce)
1 tsp sugar or Grenadine (to taste)
Juice of 1/2 Lemon or 1 Lime
1 Egg White
1 tbsp thick Cream

Shake with cracked ice and pour into a goblet. Fill with club soda, seltzer, or vichy (to taste). Garnish with a pieces of pineapple.

A few years ago, an Italian Bartender named Valentino Bolognese won some cocktail competitions with an Angostura heavy Pisco Sour sweetened with Orgeat.

Trinidad Especial
1 oz Angostura Aromatic bitters
1 oz orgeat syrup
2/3 oz lime juice
1/3 oz Pisco Mistral
Shake well with ice and fine strain in to a cocktail glass. Garnish with a lime zest twist.

Even more recently, Guiseppe Gonzalez came up with a variation on the Trinidad Especial for the New York Bar The Clover Club with, what else, Rye Whiskey instead of Pisco:

Trinidad Sour
1 oz Angostura Aromatic bitters
1 oz orgeat syrup
¾ oz lemon juice
½ oz rye
Shake well with ice and fine strain in to a cocktail glass.

Last night one of our regular guests came in, wanting something to drink but feeling like his previous drinks, and dinner, hadn’t agreed with him. He wanted “Something Fizzy”.

With all those drinks mashed together in my head, I figured I could make him an Angostura Fizz. And indeed, it seemed to fix him right up!

Angostura Fizz
1/2 oz Angostura Bitters
1 oz White Demerara Rum
3/4 oz Lime Juice
3/4 oz Simple Syrup (or to taste)
1/2 oz Egg White
Soda Water

Shake Bitters, Rum, Lime, Simple Syrup, and Egg White together vigorously without ice. Add ice and shake until well chilled. Strain into a Fizz Glass and top with chilled soda water.

Texas Fizz

Texas Fizz
The Juice of 1/4 Orange. (Juice 1/2 Tangerine)
The Juice of 1/4 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lime)
1 Teaspoonful Powdered Sugar. (Generous teaspoon Rich Simple Syrup)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz North Shore Distiller’s Gin No. 6)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

I am not quite sure why exactly this is a “Texas” Fizz. I guess they do grow a fair amount of citrus there, though I more strongly associate them with Grapefruit.

I massaged it a bit, using the juice of half a Tangerine and half a lime, instead of the 1/4 Lemon and 1/4 Orange it calls for. Ended up pretty tasty.

When I started making these I was still using water from a Britta Pitcher and often found the ice had off flavors. We recently invested in a new more effective filter which attaches to the faucet. The ice is way better. It’s funny, you generally think of cocktails as having fairly big flavors, a little off flavor from the ice isn’t going to ruin anything. Most modern, over driven cocktails probably fall into that category, there’s so much going on you probably wouldn’t notice some off flavor from the ice. On the other hand, with a four ingredient, fairly subtle drink like this and these fizzes, any off flavors from ice, or anything else, are right up there in front.

The easiest way I’ve ever found to find out what your ice tastes like is to pour a few ounces of cold water into your cocktail shaker. Add ice. Shake and strain it into a glass just as if you were making a cocktail. Does the chilled water taste good? If it doesn’t, that same ice isn’t going to be contributing anything good to your cocktails either.

So how about the Texas Fizz?

It’s kind of good, refreshing and light. It’s not a mind blowing cocktail, but it’s also not blowing out your taste buds with your first sip. You drink it and think, “That was nice, what’s next?”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

South Side Fizz

First, just a reminder that Sunday, August 28, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails, (they also have a great beer selection,) on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders, (and me,) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

South Side Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lemon, Juice 1/2 Lime)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (1-ish Tablespoon Rich Simple Syrup, or to taste)
1 Glass Gin. (2 oz Anchor Junipero Gin)

Shake well strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.  Add fresh mint leaves.

As I noted a couple years ago, The South Side, even though it is often now served without soda, has its roots in a Fizz. That is, a Gin Fizz with mint and sprigs of mint for garnish.

The recipe for the South Side Fizz is a little oblique as far as instructions go.

My advice as far as METHOD goes:

Combine Gin, Citrus, Syrup, and a few Mint Leaves in a shaker tin. Shake well and fine strain into an 8 oz Juice or Fizz Glass. Top with Soda Water and garnish with fresh sprigs of mint.

Any drink with leaves of fresh herbs in the shaker tin should always be fine strained. Little green specks of mint look no good in anyone’s teeth, especially when they’re trying to impress their date.

The South Side is another classic cocktail, which really only became possible to make properly with the advent of the modern bar and the return of fresh mint and citrus to the bar set up. It is truly one of the GREAT drinks and a crowd pleaser, tunable for almost any guest, even those that think they don’t like Gin. Also one of my wife’s favorites, give it a try on yours.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Silver Fizz

First, just a reminder that Sunday, August 28, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails, (they also have a great beer selection,) on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders, (and me,) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Silver Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Meyer Lemon, Juice 1/2 Lime)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (Generous Teaspoon Rich Simple Syrup)
l Glass Gin. (2 oz Junipero Gin)
The White of 1 Egg.
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

Do I need to mention that the recipe for this drink was published in Hugo Ensslin’s 1916 “Recipes for Mixed Drinks before the Savoy Cocktail Book? His recipe is minimal: “Made same as plain Gin Fizz, adding the white of an egg.”

I have nothing against Egg White in Fizzes, but just to reiterate, a “plain Gin Fizz” does NOT have Egg White.

However, a Silver Fizz DOES have egg white.

All those Egg White containing Gin Fizzes being served at modern fancy cocktail bars are, in fact, Silver Fizzes. And fine, fine drinks they are indeed.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Ruby Fizz

First, just a reminder that Sunday, August 28, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails, (they also have a great beer selection,) on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders, (and me,) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Ruby Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Meyer Lemon)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (1/2 tsp Rich Simple Syrup)
The White of 1 Egg. (1 Egg White)
2 Dashes Raspberry or Grenadine syrup. (1 TBSP Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1 Glass Sloe Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Sloe Gin)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.
Starting to sound a bit like a Broken record! This is another Fizz from Hugo Ensslin’s 1916 “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”.

His recipe is pretty close to the Savoy recipe, except it does suggest Raspberry Syrup, not give you the choice between it and Grenadine: Juice ½ Lemon; 1 teasponful Powdered Sugar; White 1 Egg; 2 dashes Raspberry Syrup; 1 drink Sloe Gin. Shake and serve as directed for Gin Fizz.

I bounced the recipe a bit more towards the grenadine and a bit less towards the sugar.

One of the Fizzes we frequently get orders for on Savoy Nights, I never really feel any qualms at all about making it, as long as we have Plymouth Sloe Gin in the house. It is really a very tasty drink.

Though for some reason, I always think it has Port Wine in it until I look it up. I guess it is the “Ruby” in the name, as in Ruby Port.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Royal Fizz

Royal Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Meyer Lemon, Juice 1/2 Lime)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (1 TBSP Rich Simple Syrup)
1 Glass Gin. (2 oz Junipero Gin)
1 Egg. (1 Egg)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

Yet another Fizz from Hugo Ensslin’s 1916 “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”, about this Fizz he says, “Made same as plain Gin Fizz, adding the whole of one Egg.”

I do think a whole egg is a little much, with modern eggs as large as they are. Suggest hunting down “Medium” eggs or even just using half a Large or Extra-Large Egg.

Like cream drinks, whole egg drinks sometimes draw the askance look from those perusing the book.

Personally, I like Flips and their Citrus laden brethern, the Egg Sour and Royal Fizz. Heck, even the ones with just Egg Yolks, like the Bosom Caresser are kind of nice.

Well, as they say, your mileage may vary.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Pineapple Fizz

Pineapple Fizz
2 Tablespoonsful Pineapple Juice.
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar.
1 Glass Bacardi Rum.
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

So I asked for a Pineapple Fizz at a restaurant in San Francisco.

The recipe didn’t seem entirely promising to me, but the restaurant has fresh pressed pineapple juice, so I was curious to see how that would work.

I said something to the bartender like, “Hey, wanna make a Savoy Cocktail? The Pineapple Fizz is Rum, 2 tablespoons of pineapple juice, and sugar. I leave the rum up to you. It is my feeling it might need a little extra tartness, but I’m not sure.”

He was interested in the idea.

He walked to his station down the bar. Gave the idea some thought, looked up, and came back.

He asked, “This is a fizz, right?”

To which I said, “Yes,” and as he was walking away, immediately thought, “Oh crap, he’s going to put egg white in the drink.”

So we ended up with Barbancourt 8 Year old Rum, Pineapple Juice, Lime Juice, Pineapple Gum Syrup, Lime, and Egg White.

With similar proportions to Heaven’s Dog’s Gin Fizz Tropical, we both admitted this version of the Pineapple Fizz is just not very good. The combination of juice and pineapple gum syrup puts the pineapple out there too strongly. Instead of being a light refreshing Fizz, it was tart and cloying at the same time, in the way that only too much pineapple can be. Sits on your stomach badly. They can’t all be winners.

Though to be honest, I think there might be an OK drink here, but more of a slightly pineapple-ey Rum and Soda Water kind of thing than what most people think of as a modern, intense, citrus driven Fizz. And as much as I like Barbancourt 8, I think the unaged Barbancourt might be a better choice. To be continued…

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Peach Blow Fizz

Peach Blow Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon or 1 Lime (Juice 1/2 Lemon AND juice 1/2 Lime)
4 Mashed Strawberries. (6 Mashed Raspberries)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (Generous Tablespoon Rich Simple Syrup)
1 Tablespoonful Sweet Cream. (1 Tablespoon Heavy Whipping Cream)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Plymouth Gin)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

Another of the Fizzes sourced from Hugo Ensslin’s 1916 “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”, the original recipe is slightly different from the Savoy Cocktail Book:

Peach Blow Fizz: Juice ½ Lime; Juice ½ Lemon; 4 Strawberries, mashed up; 1 teasponful Powdered Sugar; 1 drink Gin; 1 Pony Cream. Made and served as directed for plain Gin Fizz.

Again you see Ensslin calling for more than one type of citrus. His recipe also calls for a bit more cream, generally a “Pony” is considered an ounce.

The Peach Blow Fizz is one of those puzzling cocktails. First off, there’s the whole “Blow” thing, that, as far as I know nobody really understands. Second there’s the “Peach” thing. Why is this a “Peach Blow Fizz” without any peaches?

I have no idea.

What I can tell you is, the Peach Blow Fizz is a delicious species of Fizz.

The cream sometimes freaks people, well men, out. One Savoy Cocktail Book night, a friend was in and interested in Savoy Cocktails with Strawberries. He’d tried the Bloodhound and I’d garnished his King Cole with Strawberries (Fernet and Strawberries, a great combination, by the way) and was looking for a Third drink before calling it a night. I mentioned the Peach Blow Fizz, and he said, “Oooh, that has cream, doesn’t it?” So that was a no go.

Anyway, I think I ended up making a non-strawberry drink, Jabberwock or something, but I was a little sad he didn’t man up and just drink the pink fruity concoction. It’s not like it has a lot of Cream, or anything. It’s no Grasshopper or Brandy Alexander.

Oh, yeah, Raspberries. I forgot to buy strawberries, so substituted frozen raspberries this time. A change I do heartily recommend.

Tasty, pink, fruity, and boozy, it’s actually a pretty serious drink, for all its girliness.

Heh, one of these days, I’m going to have to try it out when I get an order for a Gin and citrus Bartender’s choice, not too sweet. I bet they’ll love it.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Ostend Fizz

Ostend Fizz
1/2 Liqueur Glass Crème de Cassis. (3/4 oz Brizard Cassis de Bourdeaux)
1/2 Liqueur Glass Kirsch. (3/4 oz Clear Creek Kirsch)
(Dash Meyer Lemon Juice)
Shake well strain into medium size glass and fill with soda water.

The in the previous reference to “Ostend” was in a quote regarding the Vanderbilt Cocktail, “This drink was first made at the Kursaal in Ostend during a visit of Colonel Cornelius Vanderbilt, the American Millionaire…”

Kursaal Ostend

“Before World War II, Ostend was a highly frequented gambling resort for the upper-class British citizens, especially since Queen Victoria prohibited gambling in the ´20s. The gambling law was applied throughout the entire Kingdom, making it impossible for the British people to enjoy gambling in England or in any colonial territory serving under Union Jack. However, the Queen’s law never applied to Belgium, something that made the Kursaal Casino a very popular destination for the U.K. gamblers during the roaring twenties.”

A gambler’s fizz, I guess, definitely French-ish, with its Kirsch and Cassis and definitely upscale. Kirsch, after all, has always been an expensive spirit, at least the good stuff.

This isn’t bad, a tad Cherry soda-ish, certainly less interesting than a Singapore or Straits Sling. Even though I couldn’t resist a touch of citrus, you see people ordering Cassis and Soda in French movies all the time. I guess they didn’t mind the sweetness. To me, a Fizz just isn’t a Fizz without a little citrus.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.