“Everything But” Cocktail

“Everything But” Cocktail

1/4 Whisky. (3/4 oz Compass Box blended Asyla Scotch Whisky)
1/4 Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/4 Lemon Juice. (3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/4 Orange Juice. (3/4 oz Fresh Orange Juice)
1 Egg.
1 Teaspoonful of Apricot brandy. (1 teaspoon Rothman & Winter Marillen Apricot Eau-de-Vie)
Powdered Sugar. (scant teaspoon caster sugar)

(Combine ingredients in shaker without ice and shake for 10 seconds. Add big ice…) Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Bunch of new technology here. First off, I finally scored a few 18oz cheater tins to top my 28 oz boston shakers. These are spiffy and seem nominally less messy when making egg drinks. Second we have the big sturdy tovolo ice cubes being employed instead of regular refrigerator ice. Third, I’m continuing my experiments with dry shaking. Fourth, given the size of this cocktail, I got to get out my bigger coupes.


Now, if the lovely texture of the egg in the first picture wasn’t enough, this second one with a clear half inch of delicious foam should indicate progress is being made.

Regarding ingredients, many of the cocktails calling for simply “Whisky” in the “Savoy Cocktail Book” are from Judge Jr.’s 1927 “Here’s How”. In that book Scotch is specified. I went with the Apricot Eau-de-Vie instead of liqueur, as there was already plenty of sugar here, and I like Eau-de-Vies in egg cocktails.

I kind of thought I was getting tired of sour cocktails, but this one is quite tasty and fairly complex. “Velvety,” would be a good word for it. I really enjoyed it.

Regarding the name, Judge Jr. sez, “This little drink is christened thusly because it contains everything but the kitchen stove!”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Cupid Cocktail

Cupid Cocktail

Cupid Cocktail

1 Glass Sherry. (2 oz Lustau Don Nuno Dry Oloroso)
1 Fresh Egg.
Teaspoonful Powdered Sugar. (1 tsp. caster sugar)
A little Cayenne Pepper.

Shake well and strain into medium size glass.

Sherry Flip, essentially. The cayenne pepper give it an interesting little kick.

Not overly complex or anything; but enjoyable all the same.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Chocolate Cocktail (No 1)

Chocolate Cocktail (No 1)

Chocolate Cocktail (No. 1)

1 Teaspoonful of Powdered Chocolate (heaping teaspoon of Scharffen Berger cocoa powder)
1 Egg
1 Liqueur Glass Maraschino (1 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
1 Liqueur Glass Yellow Chartreuse (1 oz Yellow Chartreuse)
(dash Pierre Ferrand Cognac)

Shake well and strain into large glass.

Now, I’m not sure if “Chocolate Powder” means something other than cocoa powder; but, if you’re going to use Cocoa Powder, it’s going to be a bit more complicated than the above instructions, unless you want a lumpy mess.

Extra equipment: 2 small bowls, rubber spatula, and a whisk or fork.

(Method: Dump a generous teaspoon of unsweetened Cocoa Power into one of your bowls. Add a teaspoon of water and mix until it starts to form a paste. Add a little more water at a time and continue mixing until it reaches the consistency of melted chocolate. Whisk up your egg in the other bowl and pour it into chocolate. Whisk together. Measure the liqueurs into your mixing tin or glass. Pour in the egg and chocolate mixture. Add ice and shake well. Strain into cocktail glass.)

Like the Cafe Kirsch Cocktail, I had no real hope that I would enjoy this. And like the Cafe Kirsch, I found it a really tasty cocktail. The Yellow Chartreuse and Maraschino combine in really interesting ways with the cocoa. Mrs. Underhill even enjoyed it.

The two ounces of liqueur might seemed like a lot. However, using unsweetened cocoa powder, that’s about what you’re going to need to balance the bitterness of the chocolate. It seemed on par or less sweet than most hot cocoa or cold chocolate drinks.

If you have a choc-a-holic friend, this might be a nice change for them from the usual “chocotini”.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Café Kirsch Cocktail

Cafe Kirsch Cocktail

Café Kirsch Cocktail

The White of 1 Egg
1 Liqueur Glass Kirsch (1 oz Trimbach Kirsch)
1/2 Tablespoon of Sugar (1 teaspoon Caster Sugar)
1 Small Glass of Cold Coffee (1 oz Peet’s Kenyan AA, Melitta Drip)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Weird. I expected to like the last cocktail and expected to dislike this one.

Wrong on both accounts.

This is tasty and pretty! I’ll take this over a Red Bull and Vodka any day.

Of course I’m going to regret drinking it, when I can’t sleep tonight at midnight.

Couple Additional Notes:

If you don’t have decent strong drip coffee for it, use espresso.

In the US a number of the larger liqueur companies market something they call Kirschwasser. If you look at the ingredients on the back, you will discover that it is typically artificially flavored and sweetened neutral spirits. I’ve tried a couple (they’re cheap) and they are truly vile. Think, cherry cough drops dissolved in kerosene.

Kirsch or Cherry Eau de Vie is almost always sold in 375ml bottles and is relatively expensive. It is distilled from a “wine” made from fermented cherry juice and is (usually) an unaged clear spirit. In the US, Clear Creek, St. George Spirits, Peak Spirits, and others make acceptable versions.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Café De Paris Cocktail

Cafe des Paris Cocktail

Café De Paris Cocktail

The White of 1 Egg
3 Dashes Anisette (1 Barspoon Anis del Mono)
1 Teaspoonful of Fresh Cream
1 Glass of Dry Gin (2 oz Boodles Gin)

Shake well and strain into medium size glass.

Kind of underimpressed with this one. Maybe I overshook and it got a bit diluted? Anyway, I felt like the anis could have been a bit stronger, and the cocktail a bit sweeter.

Cafe de Paris is a famous nightclub in London.

The Prince of Wales was a well known guest in the early days, somehow insuring the club’s success. Hmmm… Wait a sec. Seems familiar somehow… Something about Prince Harry and a treasure box, Mahiki tiki bar becoming successful in London. Do the British never get tired of these characters?

Anyway, my favorite story from the Cafe de Paris website:

In 1939 the Café was allowed to stay open even though theatres and cinemas were closed by order. People gossiped their way through the blackout and the Café was advertised as a safe haven by Martin Poulson, the maitre d’, who argued that the four solid storeys of masonry above were ample protection. This tragically proved to be untrue on March 8th 1941 when two 50K landmines came through the Rialto roof straight onto the Café dance floor. Eighty people were killed, including Ken ‘Snakehips’ Johnston who was performing onstage at the time and Poulson whose words had come back to haunt him. Had the bomb been dropped an hour later, the casualties would have been even higher.

The Ken Snakehips Johnson Story. I’ll take that over a story about the English monarchy any day.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Bronx (Silver) Cocktail

Bronx (Silver) Cocktail

The Juice of 1/4 Orange
The White of 1 Egg
1/4 French Vermouth (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)
1/4 Italian Vermouth (3/4 oz Cinzano Rosso Vermouth)
1/2 Dry Gin (1 1/2 oz Boodles Gin)

Shake well and strain into large wine glass.

Haven’t quite decided what I think of the Boodles.

It was on sale, so I figured I had little to lose. Flavor-wise it seems most similar to Plymouth Gin. Much lighter, though.

The other night I tried it in my usual Martini (2 oz Gin, 1/2 oz Vermouth, dash orange bitters). To me the flavor of the Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth was really the dominant element in the cocktail. It also really seemed to call out for an olive, rather than my usual lemon twist.

Here, in the Bronx (Silver), something with a little more spine, like Tanqueray, might be more appropriate. Still, all in all, a fine Sunday cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Bosom Caresser Cocktail

Bosom Caresser Cocktail*

The Yolk of 1 Egg
1 Teaspoonful of Grenadine (uh, oops, I forgot the grenadine)
1/3 Curacao (3/4 oz Brizard Orange Curacao)
2/3 Brandy (1 1/2 oz Pierre Ferrand Ambre)
(dash Regan’s orange bitters)

Shake well and strain into medium size glass. (Squeeze Orange Peel on top.)

*This might be called the “Bobby Jones” or the “Francis Ouimet” Cocktail, as these two gentleman, usually so chary of expressing preferences, distinctly expressed one for this concoction.

No, really, that’s what this cocktail is called. I’m not making it up.

Bobby Jones and Francis Ouimet were well known American golfers. I can’t tell if the quote above is some sort of swipe at them. Ladies’ Men? Golf balls are similar to egg yolks?

The cocktail is pretty tasty, in a rich, egg-ey, orange-ey, (phlegm inducing,) kind of way. I guess my missing the grenadine robbed me of a subtle fleshy hue. A float of grenadine (or pama) might be cool. I can’t say I feel inspired to go back and try it again, though, at least tonight.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Booster Cocktail

Booster Cocktail

4 Dashes Curacao (teaspoon Brizard Orange Curacao)
The White of 1 Egg
1 Glass Brandy (2 oz Korbel VSOP)

Shake well and strain into medium size glass. Nutmeg on top.

Shoulda been more generous with the Curacao or maybe used a nicer brandy. Dash of bitters? Champagne?

Certainly no Pisco Sour. Drinkable; but, not that interesting.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.