Widow’s Dream Cocktail

Widow’s Dream Cocktail
1 Egg
1 Liqueur Glass Benedictine.
Shake well. Strain into medium size glass, and fill glass with cream.

Interestingly, Hugo Ensslin’s version of the Widow’s Dream, from “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”, is as follows:

Widow’s Dream Cocktail
1 Drink Benedictine
1 cold fresh Egg
Fill up with Cream

Use a Cocktail Glass.

No mention of shaking at all, putting this in a category of drinks, rather like the Golden Slipper, that seems largely to have gone out of fashion by the Twentieth Century, the pousse cafe with a whole unbroken egg or egg yolk floating in it.

Like the Golden Slipper, I thought I would give it a try in the Old School manner, though I won’t use a whole egg in it.

Widow’s Dream Cocktail
1 1/2 oz Benedictine
1 Egg Yolk
1 oz Sweet Cream, softly whipped
Grated Nutmeg

Add Benedictine to glass, float in egg yolk. Layer cream on top and grate nutmeg over.

Well, it is kind of appealing looking, Sun and Clounds kind of thing. Not even entirely unpleasant to drink, though definitely go for a small-ish Chicken, or even quail, egg.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Tom & Jerry Cocktail

Tom and Jerry.*
1 Egg.
1/2 Glass Jamaica Rum. (1/2 oz Smith & Cross Jamaican Rum)
1 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (Heaping Teaspoon Caster Sugar)
1/2 Glass Brandy. (1 1/2 oz Pellahaut Armaganac Reserve)
Beat up yolk and white of egg separately. Then mix the yolk, and white together. Use stem glass or china mug, adding the spirits, then fill with boiling water, grating nutmeg on top.

*The Tom and Jerry was invented by Professor Jerry Thomas — rise please — over seventy years ago, in the days when New York was the scene of the soundest drinking on earth. The Tom and Jerry and the Blue Blazer — the latter a powerful concoction of burning whisky and boiling water– were the greatest cold weather beverages of that era.

Well, from reading David Wondrich’s fine book, “Imbibe!: From Absinthe Cocktail to Whiskey Smash, a Salute in Stories and Drinks to “Professor” Jerry Thomas, Pioneer of the American Bar,” we know that Jerry Thomas probably did not invent this drink. It really isn’t anything more than a hot flip, a pretty darn common drink, though flips were more likely made with Ale or Fortified Wine in the early days of our country.

For some reason this cocktail is one which, like Egg Nog, provokes a pretty strong response when you mention it to people. I’m not really exactly sure why, as it is nothing more than boozy custard in a glass, something I am totally down with. Heck, the eggs are even cooked. I guess, like Egg Nog, it probably has to do with people’s bad experiences with Tom & Jerry made from pre-packaged, over sweet, “batters”.

I got some flack from friends, when I mentioned I was making a Tom and Jerry in August. Suffering through horrible hot summers on the East Coast or in the Midwest, they were like, “Are you crazy?” Let me assure you, Tom & Jerrys are perfectly appropriate drinks for the fog shrouded, misty, cold nights that pass for “summer” here in San Francisco. It wasn’t for naught that Mark Twain was (incorrectly) attributed with the following quote, “The coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in San Francisco.”

As far as method goes, this worked pretty well for a bar friendly method the other night: Add the egg, booze, and sugar to a mixing tin with the spring from a hawthorne strainer. “Dry Shake” vigorously for 10 seconds. Break the seal. Remove the spring.  Into the tin without the eggs, add about an ounce of hot water from the hot water tower. Pour the hot water into the whipped eggs, then quickly back and forth between the tins several times. Pour into a glass, and top with freshly grated nutmeg.

Instant Tom & Jerry, and boy, the Smith & Cross and Armagnac combination is freaking delicious.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sherry and Egg Cocktail

010

Sherry and Egg Cocktail.
Place an Egg in Large Port Wine Glass, being careful not to break the yolk. Fill glass with Sherry (Solear Manzanilla Sherry).

Yep, that’s an egg in sherry. Wait, is that like a sherried, er, shired, egg? Breakfast of Champions?

This cocktail actually goes all the way back to Jerry Thomas’ Bartender’s Guide.

All the same, hm, of these sorts of whole raw egg cocktails, I have to say this was probably the least enjoyable so far. I hate to say it, but it sort of made the Prairie Hen seem appealing.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sevilla Cocktail (No. 2)

006

Sevilla Cocktail (No. 2)
1/2 teaspoonful Powdered Sugar. (1/2 teaspoon caster sugar)
1 Egg (1 Large Egg)
1/2 Port Wine. (1 1/2 oz Warre’s Warrio Port)
1/2 Bacardi Rum. (1 1/2 oz Havana Club Anejo Blanco)

Stir (I shook) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Stir this cocktail? Nearly every other drink in the book they direct you to shake, but this one has a whole egg and they tell you to stir? Ridiculous!

Didn’t particularly care for this drink, despite it being merely spitting difference from the thoroughly enjoyable Coffee Cocktail.  Not sure what is up with that.  I think maybe a darker rum might make it more enjoyable.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Royal Cocktail (No. 1)

Royal (No. 1)-3

Royal Cocktail (No. 1).
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (Generous Bar Spoon Caster Sugar)
1 Egg.
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Aviation Gin)
Shake well and strain into medium size glass.
Haven’t had Aviation Gin in the house for a while, but the generous folks at House Spirits in Portland, Oregon were kind enough to send this bottle along.

I don’t like it for everything, but it was tasty enough in this simple Gin Sour with an egg.

Like a lot of modern (or New Western) style gins, they include some non-traditional botanicals in their flavorings.  In Aviation’s case, the big departure is Lavender.  Nice, but it just doesn’t work in some drinks.  Actually, IMHO, its namesake the Aviation, is one of those drinks where it really doesn’t work all that well.  But that is neither here nor there.

I enjoyed it in this drink, the Royal Cocktail (No. 1), and also think it makes a fine ATTY.  Other than that, you’re on your own.  Let me know what you find out.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Prairie Hen Cocktail

Prairie Hen Cocktail

Prairie Hen Cocktail.

2 Dashes Vinegar.
1 Teaspoonful Worcestershire Sauce.
1 Egg.
2 Dashes Tabasco Sauce.
A little Pepper and Salt.

Do not break the Egg.

Yuppers, that’s a whole egg with some stuff dashed on.

Irish Supplies

In the spirit of making the most authentic Savoy Prairie Hen possible, I traveled out to the Roxy Grocery Store in the sunset where they sell Irish and British goods.  Picked up some UK malt vinegar, some UK Worcestershire, and some Chef Brand Ketchup.

Having armored myself with these bastions of quality, I cracked the egg into the glass, dashed on the ingredients, and sucked it down.

I really do recommend chasing it with a shot of whiskey.  Or maybe tequila.  Disinfectant properties and all.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Los Angeles Cocktail

Los Angeles Cocktail

The Los Angeles Cocktail
(4 People)

The Juice of 1 Lemon. (Juice a generous quarter of a Lemon)
4 Hookers Whisky. (2 oz Eagle Rare Bourbon)
4 Teaspoonsful Sugar. (1 teaspoon sugar)
1 Egg. (About a quarter of a whisked large egg)
1 Dash Italian Vermouth. (a splash of Carpano Antica)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Drops of Angostura to garnish.)

I will note that this recipe is nearly verbatim from Judge Jr.’s “Here’s How” except that Judge Jr. calls for “Scotch” instead of just “Whisky”. He also adds the comment, “After trying this you will understand why they talk about the climate out there.” Whatever that means.

I wasn’t feeling much like Scotch and the bottle of Eagle Rare Bourbon was handy.

I also took the liberty of borrowing the Angostura drop garnish from the Pisco Punch, which adds a nice spicy scent to the cocktail. And, well, plus bitters, so you can actually call it a cocktail!

I really enjoyed this cocktail. It’s too bad so many people are skittish about whole eggs in cocktails, as this cocktail is a great pick me up. As Harry McElhone sez about the Swissess in “Barflies and Cocktails”, “This is a very good bracer for that feeling of the morning after the night before.”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Grand Royal Clover Club

New toy:

I was reading somewhere that athletes and folks who drink vitamin supplements have something they call “blender balls” they put in their drinks so they can keep the particles in suspension as they are exercising. Someone mentioned using them in a cocktail shaker. A visit to a local vitamin and supplement emporium yielded results.

Grand Royal Clover Club Cocktail

The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (about 3/4 ounce fresh lemon juice)
1 Tablespoonful Grenadine. (1 Tablespoon homemade Grenadine)
1 Egg. (1 egg white)
1 glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Tanqueray)

(Dry shake drink ingredients with blender ball or spring for 10 seconds or so. Remove your implement of choice. Add big ice and…) Shake well and strain into medium size glass.

Hard to say if this if the blender ball results in an improvement. Good texture and pretty decent head, for a home bartender.

But, damn it, as I was writing this up, I noticed this recipe calls for a whole egg, not an egg white! It’s just so weird, as I have looked at this recipe for over a week, thinking it was odd that it was no different from the other Clover Club recipes in the book. I thought there should be something different about it, being “Grand Royal” and all.

Fortunately, I was meeting a friend at Alembic for drinks. The always wonderful Alembic bartenders were willing to make a random Savoy recipe on a non-Savoy night. Actually, they seemed a bit excited to get to make a whole egg cocktail.

Anyway, yep, that’s tasty. The yolk gives it a delicious extra richness and texture.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Golden Slipper Cocktail

Golden Slipper Cocktail

1/2 Liqueur Glass Yellow Chartreuse. (1 oz Yellow Chartreuse)
The Yolk of 1 Fresh Egg.
1/2 Liqueur Glass Eau de Vie de Danzig. (1 oz Danzig Goldwasser)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I guess an interesting point, if yer a cocktail geek, about the Golden Slipper, is that Robert Vermeire places it in with his Pousse Cafe drinks. But, but by the 1930s, both Craddock and Duffy are saying it is a shaken drink.

Being an old-school kind of guy, I figured pousse cafe. Plus, if you’re shaking the thing, it sort of negates the point of using the gold wasser.

Golden Slipper Cocktail, Old School

1/2 Liqueur Glass Yellow Chartreuse. (1 oz Yellow Chartreuse)
The Yolk of 1 Fresh Egg.
1/2 Liqueur Glass Eau de Vie de Danzig. (1 oz Danzig Goldwasser)

Pour Yellow Chartreuse into a sherry glass. Gently drop in whole egg yolk. Pouring over the back of a spoon, slowly add Danzig Goldwasser, so the two liquids do not mix.

It doesn’t seem like there is a huge visual difference between yellow Chartreuse and Danzig Goldwasser, but the flavors are fairly distinct. The Gold Wasser is not as sweet with more of a gin-like edge than the chartreuse.

On the “golden slipper” front, “The Golden Slipper” appears to be a folk tale of Asian origin. The best, and spookiest, google I found, was this vietnamese version:

A Cinderella Tale from Vietnam

Wow, it’s got ghosts, skeletons, murder, cruelty, etc. Anyway, yeah, that’s Cinderella, all right. Amazing the whitewashed stuff we Anglos get stuck with.

Also, “Golden Slipper” was the name of a charity formed by a group of Jewish Masons in 1922.

Golden Slipper Club

Perhaps they enjoyed the odd cocktail?

Update regarding Goldwasser, I received a question, “but is the dantzig sweet? i thought it was just russian eau de vie that had gold flake in it…”

Everything I’ve read suggests that Eau-de-Vie de Danzig and Goldwasser are synonymous. The one I used, “Der Lachs Original Danziger Goldwasser,” is an 80 proof herbal/spice liqueur. It didn’t seem quite as sweet as Yellow Chartreuse, but I didn’t try them side by side, just together in the drink.

Nice article here:

Gdansk Goldwasser: Alchemic Elixir

Goldwasser liqueur (literally ‘gold water’ in German), has been a popular Gdansk tradition since 1598. And though other brands and distilleries have tried to copy it, Goldwasser continues to be inextricably linked to Gdansk. A strong (40%) root and herbal liqueur, Goldwasser’s famous feature is the small flecks of 22 karat gold flake that float in the beverage. Though the posh prestige of the alcohol has historically made it a favorite drink of such darlings as Russia’s Catherine the Great, the rather diminutive gold flakes suspended in Goldwasser fail to make its price inordinate or its health effects negligible.

Hope that helps!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Eye Opener Cocktail

Eye-Opener Cocktail

The Yolk of 1 Fresh Egg.
1 Teaspoonful Powdered Sugar. (scant teaspoon Caster Sugar)
2 Dashes Absinthe. (1/2 tsp Verte de Fougerolles)
2 Dashes Curacao. (1/2 tsp Brizard Orange Curacao)
2 Dashes Crème de Noyau. (1/2 tsp Amaretto di Saschira)
1 Liqueur Glass Rum. (1 1/2 oz Inner Circle Green Rum)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Sadly, my schemes to acquire Noyau de Poissy or Noyau de Vernon have so far come to naught, so I have substituted Luxardo’s Amaretto.

Unlikely though it seems, this is a very nice cocktail, and will certainly open your eyes, should they previously have been closed.

Both this and the preceding “Everything But” would make tremendous brunch cocktails. If we find enough of these, maybe we can finally put those old saws, the mimosa and screwdriver, back to bed where they belong.

By the way, If you’re like me, you’ll make this cocktail, taste it, and think of that open bottle of champagne in your fridge. Go for it. It’s even tastier that way.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.