Golden Fizz

Golden Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lemon, Juice 1/2 Lime)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (2 tsp Caster Sugar)
1 Glass Gin. (2 oz Ransom Old Tom Gin)
The Yolk of 1 Egg. (1 Farm Fresh Egg Yolk)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

As with most of the Fizzes, the Savoy Cocktail Book editors probably got the recipe for the Golden Fizz from Hugo Ensslin’s 1916 “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”. In his book, Ensslin gives the recipe as, “Made same as plain Gin Fizz, adding the yolk of an egg.”

Here’s Ensslin’s recipe for the Gin Fizz from the Cocktail Kingdom reprint:

Gin Fizz
Juice of ½ Lime;
Juice ½ Lemon;
1 tablespoon of Powdered Sugar;
1 drink Dry Gin.

Shake well in a mixing glass with cracked ice, strain into fizz glass, fill up with carbonated or any sparkling water desired.

The interesting thing about Ensslin’s recipe for the “Plain Gin Fizz” is that he uses both Lemon and Lime in the drink! Well, interesting is, I suppose, relative, but the additional tart citrus does make the sugar amounts and dilution in the Fizz recipes a bit more sensible.

Anyway, I’ve been ignoring the lemon-lime combo information up until now, (I was out of limes,) but I thought it was finally time to put it into play with the Golden Fizz.

When I mentioned this to someone they said, “Are you kidding, that’s Sour Mix!” Well, it’s not really, it’s just that Lemons and Limes bring different things to the party. Lemons are more sour, limes are more bitter and aromatic. Put them together, especially with Gin, and you get a sum greater than the parts!

You give it a try some time with a Sour or Fizz and let me know if you don’t think it elevates a somewhat plain drink.

As we discussed in the Gin Fizz post, when you add Egg White to a Fizz, you get a Silver Fizz. When you add Egg Yolk you, naturally, get a Golden Fizz. Richer, fuller, more unctuous. Not an every day refreshing fizz, to be sure, but a satisfying beverage of a different sort.

Music in the video is from the Lean Left Album, “The Ex Guitars meet Nilssen-Love/Vandermark Duo, Vol. 2″.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Parson’s Special Cocktail

One thing that I’m hoping to do this year is to get out a bit more to bars around town. While I’m at it, I plan to, ahem, challenge the talent a bit more than I have, by requesting that they make Savoy Cocktails.

For this outing, we met some friends in North Beach where we decided to have dinner at the new-ish Comstock Saloon. Well, it’s really only “new-ish” if you get out to North Beach as infrequently as Mrs. Flannestad and I do. Ahem, I think they’ve been open for at least 8 months.

Among the bars and restaurants that opened last year, a new trend was bars that take themselves seriously as cocktail destinations, yet have really very decent food. Both Bar Agricole and Comstock Saloon fall into this category. Where previously it had almost seemed that it was the restaurants which were leading the charge as destinations for amazing cocktails, now we are seeing places that are first and foremost cocktail destinations, yet are being written up also as food destinations.

That it incorporates “Saloon” in its name and is located in North Beach, gives you a good idea what to expect. Located in the space which was most recently the San Francisco Brewing Company, Comstock is a rowdy, fun bar with live music and weekend crowds. That you can also get “Beef Shank and Bone Marrow Pot Pie” or “Chicken Fried Rabbit” is an indication of where “Bar Food” is at these days in San Francisco. I’m all for it, especially when the food is priced as well as it is at Comstock.

Parson’s Special Cocktail
4 Dashes Grenadine.
1 Glass Orange Juice.
The Yolk of 1 Egg.
Shake well and strain into medium size glass.

For my first drink, to be a pain in the ass. I asked for “Barkeep’s Whismy” and specified “something brown”. I got back a very well made Brooklyn, one of my all time favorite drinks, and quite enjoyed it. As far as “Whimsy” goes, maybe a bit on the “safe” side, but hard to complain.

As I was perusing the menu, I noticed they had the new beer from Anchor Brewing, Brekel’s Brown. It proved to be a great companion to my Beef Shank and Bone Marrow Pot Pie.

After we finished dinner, the server asked us if there was anything else she could bring. I wrote down the recipe for the Parson’s Special and told her it was for a blog project I was working on.

A well executed drink came back, with the spice from their house Grenadine giving this rather plain recipe a well needed lift. Quite similar to what I remember an Orange Julius tasting like, I’m not sure I would order the Parson’s Special again, but I know I will return to Comstock Saloon to sample more of their food and drink menu.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Thunder and Lightning Cocktail

First, just a reminder that this Sunday, August 29, 2010, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders (and me) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Thunder and Lightning Cocktail
The Yolk of 1 Egg. (1 Egg Yolk)
1 Teaspoonful Powdered Sugar. (1 teaspoon Caster Sugar)
1 Glass Brandy. (2 oz Chateau Pellehaut Armagnac)
Shake well and strain into medium size glass. Dash of Cayenne Pepper on top.

Well, aside from the use of Gum Syrup instead of powdered sugar in the Thunder and the instruction to put the Cayenne Pepper on top of this one, there’s really no difference between the Thunder and Thunder and Lightning Cocktails.

The use of a Medium size glass for a Savoy recipe, however, usually means that the cocktail has a dash of selzer on top. So I added one. Kind of lightened things up a bit, so there you go! If you really wanted to add some zip to this, you might add some Champagne. You’ll be seeing stars!

In light of the recent Salmonella in eggs news, I suppose I should say something about eggs in cocktails.

Some people maintain that Salmonella only comes from contamination on the outside of the egg. This is not true, if the egg laying chickens are sufficiently infected, the whole egg will contain Salmonella bacteria.

Other people maintain there is some “disinfecting” property in alcohol that kills the bad bacteria in eggs. While high proof alcohol is an effective topical disinfectant, the odds of contaminated egg material being exposed to high enough proof alcohol for sufficient time to kill all bacteria in a contaminated egg are slim, as far as I can tell.

I buy my eggs from a chicken farmer at the Alemany Farmers’ Market. Organic, Free Range, Cage Free, Pot Smoking, Happy, Hoppy, Hippy Chickens. Blah, blah, blah, do I live in California or what?

I guess I would say, if the thought of a minor bout with Salmonella puts you off, unless you know where your eggs come from, it’s best to go with Pasteurized in the shell eggs for cocktails.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Thunder Cocktail

First, just a reminder that this Sunday, August 29, 2010, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders (and me) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Thunder Cocktail
1 Teaspoonful Gomme Syrup. (1 Teaspoon Small Hands Food Gum Syrup)
The Yolk of 1 Egg. (The Yolk of 1 Egg)
1 Glass Brandy. (2 oz Chateau Pellehaut Armagnac Reserve)
1 Sprinkle of Cayenne Pepper (1 Sprinkle S&B Nanami Togarashi)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Well, that’s a bit odd, a Brandy Flip with Cayenne? I guess this would have been some sort of morning Pick-Me-Up.

Chuckle, well, why not use this interesting Japanese Pepper blend? Sure, it has Seaweed and Black Sesame Seeds, but what the heck? A little Umami never killed anyone.

It’s not a drink I will likely make again soon, but neither is it bad. Other than heat, the spice blend doesn’t contribute a lot to the cocktail, but it is enough to be noticeable.

A spicy flip? Why not?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Royal Clover Club Cocktail

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Royal Clover Club Cocktail.
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
1 Tablespoonful Grenadine. (Generous Tablespoon homemade Grenadine)
The Yolk of 1 Egg.
1 Glass Gin. (2 oz Beefeater’s Gin)
Shake well and strain into medium size glass.

An enjoyable cocktail. Sadly the last of the Clover Club family, including the Clover Club, Clover Leaf, and Grand Royal Clover Club.

Though, I suppose I could go through and re-do them all with Small Hand Foods Raspberry Gum instead of Grenadine…

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Prairie Oyster Cocktail

Prairie Oyster Cocktail

Prairie Oyster Cocktail.

2 Dashes Vinegar. (Malt Vinegar)
The Yolk of 1 Egg.
1 Teaspoonful Worcestershire Sauce. (From the UK!)
1 Teaspoonful Tomato Catsup. (Chefs Brand Ketchup)
1 Dash of Pepper on Top.

Do not break the Yolk of Egg.

Similar to the Prairie Hen, but only the yolk this time.

While I will recommend you serve this with a shot back, I don’t really get what the big deal is.

It’s just a raw egg, is that so terrifying?

Man (or Woman) up, fer cripes sake!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Night Cap Cocktail

Night Cap Cocktail

Night Cap Cocktail

The Yolk of 1 Egg.
1/3 Anisette. (3/4 oz Gantous and Abou Rad Arak)
1/3 Curacao. (3/4 oz Cointreau)
1/3 Brandy. (3/4 oz Dudognon Cognac)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I’ve written about “Arak” before in the post “Ar(r)a(c)k Disambiguation“. This is the Anise flavored grape spirit from Lebanon.  Because there are various degrees of sweetness in Anisette and Anise flavored liqueurs and this drink is already 1/3 orange liqueur, I figured it would be fun to pretend it called for a dry style anise liqueur and use Arak instead of Anisette.

The Night Cap is also a fine example of me not being able to follow a recipe even though I try hard to read them and execute. I knew I was running low on Cointreau, so stopped to buy some on the way home.

Then I looked at the recipe. Checked for the Orange Curacao in the kitchen cupboard. Headed down to the basement to find the Arak. Came back upstairs and made the recipe with Cointreau. Why, I do not know.  Sometimes my hands just don’t tell my brain what they are doing.

So, even though I didn’t really quite make the recipe accurately, ooops, this was quite tasty.  Anise and orange are a proven great combination and the brandy brings some sort of other mediation to the party.  Definitely an enjoyable cocktail, so  I can’t see going back and doing it the “right” way.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Ichbien Cocktail

Osocalis Brandy

I continue on my bizarrely Wisconsinite struggle to define my ideal Cognac/Brandy. I’ve discarded some early predilections (Korbel VSOP, E&J, etc.) and tried to move things a bit more cosmopolitan. I can’t say my early flirtations with California Brandies have been entirely successful. Germain-Robin’s alembic brandy seeming a bit tedious after drinking a whole bottle. The French. There’s some sort of French Chortling sound here. Oh, the French. I do like Pierre Ferrand Cognac and Cerbois Armangac. Ah, but the exchange rate. It seems like they go up $5 every month!

So here we are today.

Osocalis have been distilling brandy for about 10 years. They released their first brandy in 2006. I’m just getting around to tasting it now, and it is pretty darn OK. I’m no expert, but I like that there is a bit of the flavor of the wine in the spirit. It’s a bit tart and, well, winey. Definitely on the young and feisty side, which is OK by me.

To get around to Savoy Cocktails…

Ichbien Cocktail

Ichbien Cocktail

The Yolk of 1 Egg.
1 Port-wine Glass Milk. (2 oz Half and Half)
1/4 Orange Curacao. (1/4 oz Luxardo Triplum)
3/4 Brandy. (1 1/2 oz Osocalis Brandy)

Shake well and strain into medium size glass, with nutmeg on top.

I’m not normally a big milk cocktail fan, but I liked, and finished, this.

I guess if it were Scotch instead of Brandy, it would be “Auld Man’s Milk”. Thanks! Old man eje says, “Lovely and perfect.”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.