Pink Baby Cocktail

Pink Baby Cocktail

Pink Baby Cocktail.

1/2 Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/4 Grenadine. (1/2 oz homemade Grenadine)
1/4 Sirop-de-citron. (1/4 oz Monin Lemon Syrup, 1/4 oz Lemon Juice)
The White of 1 Egg.

Shake well and strain into medium size glass.

Sorry, I find I just can’t hang with these “Sirop-de-Citron” cocktails with no fresh citrus. Maybe if I made my own Sirop de Citron, it would have enough bitter lemon character from the peel that it would be tasty. But just using Monin Lemon Syrup, these cocktails just aren’t that good.

Anyway, the best looking recipe I’ve found for Sirop de Citron is here:

Sirop de Citron Maison

Essentially, you slice a bunch of lemons and then preserve them by completely covering them with sugar.  The recipe on the above page calls for: 3 lemons sliced thin covered with 400 grams sugar and macerated at room temp for 3 or 4 days.  Bring to a boil and strain out the solids.

I can see how that would be quite different from the lemon syrup we typically get from Monin or Torani.

Anyway, back to the Pink Baby.  As written above, she’s not bad at all.  In fact, quite delicious, perhaps the most promising of the various upcoming “pink” cocktails.  We shall see!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Pantomime Cocktail

Pantomime Cocktail

Pantomime Cocktail.

1 Dash Orgeat Syrup. (1/3 tsp. Homemade)
1 Dash Grenadine. (1/3 tsp. Homemade)
The White of 1 Egg.
1 Liqueur Glass French Vermouth. (1 1/2 oz Noilly Original Dry)

Shake (without ice for 10 seconds.  Add ice, shake) well and strain into medium size glass.  (Garnish with drops of angostura bitters and grated nutmeg.)

Kind of odd to have egg white in a cocktail without lemon, but there you go.

I found the Pantomime an interesting and fairly enjoyable light cocktail.  Heck, you could even make this at a bar without a full liquor license!  Of course it is an awful lot of work to go for very little “bang”, if you know what I mean.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Mountain Cocktail

Mountain Cocktail

Mountain Cocktail

The White of 1 Egg.
1/6 Lemon Juice. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/6 French vermouth. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/6 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Punt e Mes)
1/2 Canadian Club Whisky. (Generous 1 oz Sazerac Straight Rye Whiskey)

(Dry shake ingredients with spring or blender ball for a half minute or so. Add ice and…) Shake well and strain into medium-size glass.

In “Barflies and Cocktails”, Harry McElhone has a slightly different take on the Mountain Cocktail: 1 white of a fresh egg; 1/6 Lemon Syrup; 1/6 French Vermouth; 1/3 Rye Whisky; 3 dashes of orange bitters.

McElhone also notes that the recipe is “from Hoffman House, New York.”

I guess it is part of Craddock’s weird compulsion to make “perfect” cocktails that leads him to use sweet and dry vermouth in the Mountain. Or maybe he found the cocktail too tart with only dry vermouth and nothing to balance against the lemon juice?

Anyway, it is a very strange cocktail.

The first flavors are all whiskey, the second flavors are the lemon juice, then in the finish the sweet vermouth and whiskey seemed to combine into flavors similar to coffee.

I didn’t exactly like it, but I kept going back, tasting it, and puzzling over the flavors.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sea Fizz

seafizz

Sea Fizz

1 1/2 oz Absinthe
Juice 1/2 lemon
1 egg white
1 tsp caster sugar (or 1 tsp 2-1 simple syrup)

Shake ingredients for 10 seconds in a cocktail shaker without ice. Add large ice and shake well. Strain into glass and top up with soda water.

There are few drinks with a lot of Absinthe that I truly like.  This is one of them.

The Sea Fizz is not in the “Savoy Cocktail Book,” but appears without the egg white in later editions of Patrick Duffy’s “Official Mixer’s Manual” as the “Seapea Fizz”.

Apparently, it was created by Frank Meier, at the time of the Gambon bar and later of the Ritz in Paris, for Cole Porter (C.P., thus “Seapea”) some time around 1933.

If you use Pernod, Ricard, or another sweetened anise liqueur, reduce, or eliminate, the sugar.

Basically an Absinthe sour, this is a delicious and dangerously refreshing beverage.

Froth Blower Cocktail

Froth Blower Cocktail

The White of 1 Egg.
1 Teaspoonful Grenadine. (homemade)
1 Glass Plymouth Gin. (2 oz Tanqueray Gin)

Shake well and strain into port wine glass.

As someone who is interested in technique, egg whites frustrate me. Sometimes you get a good amount, and sometimes they don’t work. This isn’t totally shabby, I suppose. A good eighth to a quarter inch. Still, darn that Thomas Waugh, currently at Alembic. I don’t know how he consistently gets an half inch or more every time he makes an egg white drink.

The drink is, well, gin and egg whites with a touch of grenadine, which seemed enough of an epitath until I googled “froth blower” and discovered the Ancient Order of Froth Blowers or AOFW.

“A sociable and law abiding fraternity of absorbitive Britons who sedately consume and quietly enjoy with commendable regularity and frequention the truly British malted beverage as did their forbears and as Brittons ever will, and be damned to all pussyfoot hornswogglers from overseas and including low brows, teetotalers and MP`s and not excluding nosey parkers, mock religious busy bodies and suburban fool hens all of which are structurally solid bone from the chin up.”

Whose slogan, “Lubrication in Moderation,” seems as apt today as ever.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.