Dubonnet Fizz

Dubonnet Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Orange. (Juice 1/2 Orange)
The Juice of 1/4 Lemon. (Juice 1/4 Lemon)
1 Teaspoonful Cherry Brandy. (teaspoon Cherry Heering)
1 Glass Dubonnet. (2 oz Dubonnet Rouge)
(Dash Miracle Mile Sour Cherry Bitters)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass. Fill with soda water.

Never a huge fan of Dubonnet Rouge, I was pleasantly surprised by how tasty this Fizz was, Mrs. Flannestad even approved, “Tastes like sour cherry soda! Yum!” A surprisingly tasty “low alcohol” libation.

About all I’d say is give it a pretty short shake. You’re already dealing with a low alcohol base and adding soda. There’s no reason to go all “hard shake” on this one.

I was thinking what a tasty addition Bar Agricole’s Stone Fruit Bitters were to their Tom Collins. If they can add bitters to a Collins, maybe I can add something similar to the Dubonnet Fizz. A friend of mine sent me these delicious Miracle Mile Sour Cherry Bitters. Seemed just the ticket! If you don’t have the Miracle Mile Sour Cherry Bitters at home, a dash of orange bitters instead, wouldn’t hurt.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Zaza Cocktail

Believe it or not, after the Zaza, only 2 more drinks left in the “Cocktail” section of the Savoy Cocktail Book!

751 Savoy “Cocktails” made, tasted, photographed, and blogged between June of 2006 and March of 2011.

Whew!

…Of course, then on to the remaining 137 assorted Coolers, Daisies, Fixes, Fizzes, Punches, Rickeys, etc. and the Addenda to the Second edition of the book.

No rest for the wicked.

Zaza Cocktail
1/2 Dubonnet. (1 1/2 oz Dubonnet Rouge)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Junipero Gin)
(1 dash Angostura Bitters)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Squeeze lemon peel over glass and drop in.)
Source: Hugo Ensslin, “Recipes for Mixed Drinks” 1916-1917

Like the first time I made this, oh so many years ago, as the Dubonnet Cocktail, I found the mixture of half gin and half Dubonnet Rouge a bit plain. Thus, I always feel a bit justified in adding a dash of bitters and a citrus peel to the drink.

Definitely cures the plain Jane nature of this cocktail and slightly elevates it.

Hm, many possibilities for the name, “Zaza,” from a people of a certain region of Turkey to a reservoir on the Zaza River in Sancti Spiritus, Cuba.

However, since this comes from New York bartender Hugo Ensslin’s 1916, “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”, I’m going to guess this was named after the play or movie, “Zaza”.

From the wikipedia article about Zaza:

Zaza is a play, originally written by French playwrights Pierre Berton and Charles Simon, but probably best known in the English-speaking world in the 1898 adaptation by David Belasco. The title character is a prostitute who becomes a music hall entertainer and the mistress of a married man. According to the IMDb, it was produced on stage and in film six times between 1913 and 1956.

Colorful enough to capture the imagination and the time period fits Ensslin’s book.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Wedding Belle Cocktail

Wedding Belle Cocktail
1/6 Orange Juice. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Orange Juice)
1/6 Cherry Brandy. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Cherry Brandy)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Junipero Gin)
1/3 Dubonnet. (3/4 oz Dubonnet Rouge)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.
Source: Harry McElhone’s “ABC of Cocktails”, 1928-1929

Like the Vanderbilt Cocktail, this is on the sweet side for me, even with early season Valencia Oranges.  Still, not unpleasant, and fairly light.

I chose Junipero, first because it is a high proof, intense gin.  Being only 1/3 of the cocktail, I knew the gin would have to have some spine to cut through the other ingredients.  I also used it, instead of a more traditional London Dry Gin, because I like the way it works with darker flavors like Cherry Heering and Dubonnet Rouge.

I would be tempted to add some bitters to the Wedding Belle to punch this cocktail up a bit, but afraid that would tilt it towards Robitussin-ish type flavors.

Maybe just a dash of orange bitters?  Or even Absinthe, which would bring it within spitting range of the similar, and delicious, Chas Baker, Jr. Cocktail, the Remember The Maine.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Upstairs Cocktail

Upstairs Cocktail
The Juice of 1/4 Lemon. (Still out of lemons, so I used the juice 1/2 Lime)
1 glass Dubonnet. (2 oz Dubonnet Rouge)
Use medium size glass and fill with soda water.

This is actually a fairly refreshing cocktail, the added zest of the lime gives some interest. Nice for hot weather, I would say.

As I approach the “Fizz” section of the Savoy Cocktail Book, the “Soda Water” question is starting to eat away at me.

For most of the last several years, I’ve used an iSi Soda Siphon for my soda water. It works OK and is cheaper than buying bottles of Soda Water. Besides, the filtered Hetch Hetchy water I use tastes better than a lot of the rather salty stuff you get in commercial Selzer or Soda.

Some others of my friends have recommended the Soda Stream system as superior to the iSi Soda Siphon.

Maybe it is based on a youth mis-spent watching Three Stooges movies in bank basements, but I just think a Siphon is more fun to use than pouring Selzer out of a bottle with a screw on top.

What do you use for soda water in your mixed drinks?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Temptation Cocktail

Temptation Cocktail
1 Piece Orange Peel.
1 Piece Lemon Peel.
2 Dashes Dubonnet. (5ml/1tsp Dubonnet Rouge)
2 Dashes Absinthe. (5ml/1tsp Greenway Distiller’s Absinthe Superior)
2 Dashes Curacao. (5ml/1tsp Brizard Curacao)
1 Glass Canadian Club Whisky. (2 oz Forty Creek 3 Grains Canadian Whisky)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Very similar to the Dandy Cocktail, (and with a similar method to the Newbury,) I do wonder where these cocktails which use citrus peels as an ingredient come from, as we have not yet identified a cocktail book as a source.

Interestingly, there’s a quote from the Hon. Wm (Cocktail) Boothby, Premier Mixologist, that addresses  this very issue:

Some of my recipes for the manufacture of cocktails order the dispenser to twist a piece of lemon peel into the glass in which the drink is to be served; in some establishments this is forbidden, the bartenders being ordered to twist and drop the peel into the mixing glass and strain the peel with the ice when putting the ice when  putting the drink into the mixing glass.  This is merely a matter of form, however, as the flavor is the same in both cases.

So it appears that in the cases of some establishments, rather than serving the peels in the drinks, they would be stirred in.

I don’t exactly agree with Boothby that the end result is the same. Stirring with the peel in the drink primarily flavors the drink with citrus oils, while squeezing over the cocktail accents the smell. I suppose for the best of both world’s you would stir with the peel in the drink, then squeeze over the finished cocktail, and discard. Whew! A lot of work!

A very tasty cocktail, the Temptation is one, like the Dandy, I feel could use a bit of a revival, certainly among those customers who like their cocktails Brown, Bitter, and Stirred. Well, unless they hate Absinthe/Anise, in which case, it might be best to stick with the Dandy.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Soul Kiss Cocktail (No. 2)

Soul Kiss Cocktail (No. 2)

1/6 Orange Juice. (1/2 oz Orange Juice)
1/6 Dubonnet. (1/2 oz Dubonnet Rouge)
1/3 French Vermouth. (1 oz Carpano Antica)
1/3 Canadian Club Whisky. (1 oz Thomas Handy Rye Whiskey)
1 Slice of Orange.

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Uh, oops, it appears I misremembered the type of vermouth in this cocktail while making it and didn’t notice until now.

Shoot, I blame the lovely, funky, music from Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings, along with a strange tendency to make Rye Whiskey Cocktails which call for Dry Vermouth with Sweet Vermouth.

I have the same problem with the Brooklyn. Every time I think about making it, I try to remember, this cocktail is made with Dry Vermouth. But then every time I make it, somehow Sweet Vermouth ends up in the mixing glass. It’s just weird. Then I make a Brooklyn correctly, and think, yep, you know, I prefer this with Sweet Vermouth. Just like the Old Pal vs. the Boulevardier.

I will note that, as with most cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book calling for “Canadian Club”, the source recipe for this cocktail, “Harry’s ABC,” calls for Rye Whiskey, not Canadian. And I think that is the correct choice.

This was a rather popular drink among those who tried it. “Tastes like a Manhattan,” was one comment, and they asked for the recipe. I really liked it, as well. It is a kind of fruity, but not too fruity, Manhattan.

Anecdote: Last Savoy night, one of the servers ordered a “Soul Kiss Cocktail” without specifying 1 or 2. Tim asked me which to make. I said, “No 2 has Rye Whiskey, that’s the one I would make. In fact, I would go so far as to call that a defining philosophy. If it has whiskey, it is the right choice.” He agreed.

Most importantly, should you order this cocktail during the next Savoy Night at Alembic Bar, May 23rd, 2010? Well, damn. If you order it from me, there’s still a fighting chance that I will again have a brain fart and make it with Italian Vermouth instead of Dry Vermouth. Probably one of the more competent Alembic bartenders will make it “correctly”. You might have to take your chances with this one. Pretty sure it is a good cocktail either way.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Soul Kiss Cocktail (No. 1)

Soul Kiss Cocktail (No. 1)
1/6 Orange Juice. (1/2 oz Orange Juice)
1/6 Dubonnet. (1/2 oz Dubonnet Rouge)
1/3 French Vermouth. (1 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Carpano Antica Vermouth)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

What a name, eh? We happened to be listening to Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings new CD while listening to this, if there is more appropriate music for mixing a “Soul Kiss”, I don’t know what it is.

Most importantly, should you order this cocktail during the next Savoy Night at Alembic Bar, May 23rd, 2010? You could certainly do worse, and I think especially with the Punt e Mes we play with at Alembic this will be a rocking choice. It is not a super stiff drink, more of a slow start to the evening or something to even your keel after a couple big drinks. Nice and tasty, though.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Savoy Hotel Special Cocktail (No. 2)

023

Savoy Hotel Special Cocktail (No. 2)
2 Dashes Dubonnet. (.5ml Dubonnet Rouge)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
2/3 Plymouth Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze orange peel on top.

This is a perfectly fine Martini, and all, but I would probably only really rate it as an “OK” cocktail on technical merit. Mostly, because it is so close to being a Martini.

The use of only 2 dashes of Dubonnet Rouge is really one of those puzzling things. Even being generous, as I am here, it really doesn’t even do much to pink up the cocktail, let alone add flavor. To be honest, I’m not even sure I could tell this cocktail in a blind taste test from one made with just French Vermouth and Plymouth Gin.

Anyway, while it is only an “OK” cocktail, well made, there are far worse things than Plymouth Gin, French Vermouth, a dash of Dubonnet, and an orange twist.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sanctuary Cocktail

002

Sanctuary Cocktail*
1/4 Cointreau. (1/2 oz Cointreau)
1/4 Amer Picon. (1/2 oz Torani Amer, er, well, Homemade version of Boudreau’s Amer Picon replica, actually. The Torani Amer bottle was just better looking.)
1/2 Dubonnet. (1 oz Dubonnet Rouge)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

*So-called because the Savoy, together with The Clink, Deadman’s Place, Fulwood’s Rents, The Mint, Mitre Court, Baldwin’s Gardens and Stepney were the last places in London where the privilege of “Sanctuary ” existed. Unfortunately this privilege was abolished by in “The Escape from Prison Act” in 1697. But even to-day no Ladies are allowed in the Savoy’s inner American Cocktail Bar.

“The protection afforded by a sanctuary at common law a person accused of felony might fly for safeguard of to sanctuary and there within 40 days go clothed in sackcloth before the coroner confess the felony and take an oath of t lie realm whereby he undertook to quit the kingdom and not return without the king’s leave Upon was ipso facto convict of the felony suffered attainder and forfeited all his goods but had time allowed him his oath The abjurer started forth on his journey with a wooden cross bareheaded and clothed in a robe which made him conspicuous among medieval wayfarers He had to keep to the king’s highway was not remain more than two nights in any one place and his way to the coast quickly The time allowed for was not long In Edward III s reign only nine given an abjurer to travel on foot from Yorkshire to Dover.”

I believe this is a bit of a joke, conflating the legal right of “sanctuary” with the ability to go to a bar and avoid your wife.

The cocktail itself is better than I expected. The bitterness of the Amer Picon replica does a nice job in balancing out the sweetness of the Cointreau.

These sorts of drinks always seem very much like what would be drunk in a Cafe in France, as in the picon-citron-curacao from Marcel Pagnol’s movie “Marius”.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Salome Cocktail

024

Salome Cocktail.
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Junipero Gin)
1/3 Dubonnet. (3/4 oz Dubonnet Rouge)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

While I am unclear exactly what this combination of Dry Vermouth, Dubonnet Rouge, and Dry Gin has to do with the beheading of John the Baptist, it is a fine, light libation.

An orange or lemon twist wouldn’t kill anyone, nor would a dash of bitters. Still, this is quite pleasant.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.