Yolanda Cocktail

First, just a reminder that Sunday, Feb 27, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders (and me) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

The countdown to the last “Cocktail” continues.

Say it with me, “SEVEN!”

Yolanda Cocktail
1 Dash Grenadine. (1 splash Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1 Dash Absinthe (1 dash Duplais Verte Absinthe)
1/4 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Martin Miller’s Gin)
1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 1/2 oz Carpano Antica)
1/4 Brandy. (3/4 oz Osocalis Alambic Brandy)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Squeeze Lemon Peel over glass and drop in.)

Yolanda sez to the barkeep, “You know, this Victor Cocktail is good, but it would be better with Grenadine and Absinthe.” And you know what? She was right, it is better with a dash of Absinthe and Grenadine.

Something about the herbal character of the Absinthe and touch of sweetness and tanin from the Grenadine pulls this together in a way that the Victor doesn’t even approach.

Raise a glass to Yolanda, whomever she may have been!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Yellow Rattler Cocktail

First, just a reminder that Sunday, Feb 27, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders (and me) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Thus begins the countdown to the last “Cocktail”.

Say it with me, “TEN!”

Yellow Rattler Cocktail
1/4 Orange Juice. (3/4 oz Fresh Orange Juice)
1/4 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Perucchi White Vermouth)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica)
1/4 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Anchor Genevieve Gin)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass, with small crushed pickled onion.

In his 1922 book, “Cocktails: How to Mix Them,” Robert Vermeire notes, “This Cowboy’s cocktail is similar to the Cooperstown Cocktail, but, a small bruised white onion is used instead of the bruised fresh mint sprigs.”

I guess your average Cowboy Bar didn’t have, say, Mint around, so instead, they’d substitute a pickled onion. Makes TOTAL sense to me.

*cough*

Uh, anyway, this is pretty much a Bronx cocktail with a pickled onion as a garnish.

As such, not entirely awful, and to be honest, the Anchor Genevieve, hey, Cowboy Gin if there ever was one, goes a long way towards salvaging this cocktail.

Still, unless you REALLY like pickled onions, its not one of those things that you’re probably going to be making any time soon.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Yale Cocktail

Yale Cocktail
3 Dashes Orange Bitters. (3 Dashes Bitter Truth Orange Bitters)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters. (1 Dash Angostura)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Hayman’s Old Tom Gin)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into small glass. Add a little syphon and squeeze lemon peel on top.

I guess this isn’t one of those cocktails that’s probably going to get a whole lot of new fans from me writing it up.

All booze with dashes of Orange and Angostura Bitters, this is not for the faint of heart. Even the “little syphon” doesn’t do much to soften the blow.

On the other hand, using a pleasant Gin, like the Hayman’s Old Tom, there is nothing wrong with this formulation, even if it is a little plain.

Odd that, who was it, Dashiell Hammett chose to give one of his characters a fondness for a drink as girly as the Gimlet. You’d think Gin and not much else would be closer to the hard boiled ethos, even if it is named after an Ivy League School.

I guess those jokers in the Skull and Bones Club know a thing or two about the proper way to drink.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Xanthia Cocktail

Xanthia Cocktail
1/3 Cherry Brandy. (3/4 oz Clear Creek Kirsch)
1/3 Yellow Chartreuse. (3/4 oz Yellow Chartreuse)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz North Shore Gin, No. 6)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Well, first off, there’s no real question that this drink should probably be made with something like Cherry Heering and not Kirsch.

But, I just couldn’t face a drink that was composed of 2/3 liqueur and no citrus, so I used Kirsch instead.

Hey, if Kirsch isn’t “Cherry Brandy”, nothing is!

Anyway, with Kirsch, this ends up a somewhat more interesting version of the Alaska Cocktail.  OK, it’s pretty much all booze, but surely we’re all used to that by now, right?  And Yellow Chartreuse and Kirsch make a surprisingly (or maybe not) nice combination. Herbal, floral goodness, with a kick.

If you want to get all sticklery, and make this one with Cherry Heering instead of Kirsch, feel free. Let me know how it comes out.

I’m sticking with Kirsch for the Xanthia.

As far as the name goes, it appears Xanthia is a modernization of the greek word, “Xanthe”, which, according to Behind the Name, is “Derived from a Greek word xanthos meaning “yellow” or “fair hair”. This was the name of a few minor figures in Greek mythology.”

It’s also the name of a Genus of American Moths and appears to be a popular nom de guerre for buxom, red haired female Internet exhibitionists. Ahem. Google at your own risk.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

White Wings Cocktail

White Wings Cocktail
1/3 White Crème de Menthe. (3/4 oz Brizard Creme de Menthe)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Anchor Genevieve)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Are you in need of a breath mint?

Why this cocktail is just the ticket!

Whether or not the wind lifts your White Wings will solely be determined by how much you enjoy the flavor of mint.

The Stinger Cocktail does survive somehow as a refreshing post dinner libation, this really isn’t that far from a Gin version of same.

Is it bad?

No, not really.

Is it something I will likely make again?

No, probably not.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

White Rose Cocktail

White Rose Cocktail
The Juice of 1/4 Orange. (Juice 1/4 Orange)
The Juice of 1/4 Lemon or 1/2 Lime. (Juice 1/4 Lemon)
The White of 1 Egg.
1/4 Maraschino. (1/2 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
3/4 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Bols Genever)
Shake well and strain into medium size glass.
Source: Hugo Ensslin, “Recipes for Mixed Drinks” 1916-1917

I’ve made this cocktail a few times at Alembic Bar Savoy Nights, and customers always really enjoy it.

Having been there, and done that, I thought I’d change up the gin.

I’ve been intrigued by the use of Genever in Sour cocktails, but hadn’t really tried one with egg white and/or Maraschino liqueur. However, given the friendliness of Genever to these ingredients, it didn’t seem like that big a chance to take.

After trying it, though, I have to say I definitely preferred the dry gin version I’ve made at Alembic. The well gin there is Beefeater, and this is a great Beefeater cocktail. Maybe not so much a great Genever Sour, but your mileage may vary.

Give it a try and let me know what you think.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

White Plush Cocktail

White Plush Cocktail
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Hayman’s Old Tom Gin)
1 Liqueur Glass Maraschino. (1 1/2 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
1/2 Pint of Milk. (8 oz Meyenberg Whole Goat Milk)
Shake well and strain into long tumbler.

Gin, Maraschino, and Milk? My stomach churned at the thought.

My constitution doesn’t really get along with regular milk in any quantity. I stopped drinking Milk way back in college, so there was no way I was making this as written. However, when I was examining the Dairy at our local grocery, I noticed this Whole Goats Milk. Hey! If I have to drink it, I bet I could drink the White Plush with Goats Milk.

Oof, though, Mrs. Flannestad took many pictures, trying to get them to turn out on her digital camera. She kept saying, “Again! Again! I didn’t get the picture. Drink more Milk! Again! Again!”

Got Milk?

Eventually, I had to say, “enough!” I just couldn’t drink any more Milk, even Goat Milk. Not that the White Plush was bad, exactly, but jeez. Enough Milk, is enough.

The main executional problem with the White Plush is that this is just too much volume for most shakers, especially after it is all foamy. And who knew Goat Milk would be so foamy? Didn’t really work at all in the usual 18/28 double metal tin. Maybe with a Mako Shaker on top of a 28 oz tin?

Definitely in the, “It could have been worse, but I wouldn’t do it again, unless you were paying me,” category of Savoy Cocktails.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

White Cocktail

White Cocktail
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (2 Dashes Regan’s Orange Bitters)
2 Teaspoonsful Anisette. (2 tsp. Anis del Mono Dulce)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Junipero Gin)
Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

According to Robert Vermiere’s “Cocktails: How to Mix Them”, this is a, “Recipe by Harry Brecker, Antwerp.”

I guess Mr. Brecker was fond of the booze, as this is nothing but cold booze and Orange Bitters.

I also found myself enjoying it, though aware that this enjoyment was a somewhat dangerous, double edged sword, with potential consequences.

As to why Junipero Gin, sometimes there is no time for half measures.

Or as Winston Churchill said, “The era of procrastination, of half-measures, of soothing and baffling expedients, of delays is coming to its close. In its place we are entering a period of consequences.”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Western Rose Cocktail

Western Rose Cocktail
1 Dash Lemon Juice. (1 dash Lemon Juice)
1/4 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/4 Apricot Brandy. (1/8 oz Brizard Apry, 1/8 oz Blumme Marillen)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz North Shore No. 6)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Along the lines of the English Rose Cocktail, but with only Apricot Brandy and no Grenadine.

I’ve been out of Rothman & Winter Apricot for a while now, and kind of feel like my Brizard Apry has probably seen better days. I mean, it probably has been open for 4 years now. Whatever fruity youthfulness it might have had, are probably gone.

I figured one way to get back in the direction of the Rothman & Winter would be to use some Apricot Eau-de-Vie in this, instead of all liqueur.

Between the Vermouth, Gin, and aging apricot liqueur, this skates on the edge of some sort of children’s medicine. Not sure how to exactly move forward with this not entirely successful experiment.

There’s the direction of Julie Reiner’s Gin Blossom, using Bianco/Blanc Vermouth and no lemon.

Gin Blossom
From a recipe by Julie Reiner, Clover Club, Brooklyn, and Flatiron Lounge, New York,

45 ml (1.5 oz) Plymouth Gin
22.5 ml (.75 oz) Martini Bianco
22.5 ml (.75 oz) Blume Apricot Eau de Vie
2 dashes Orange Bitters
1 Lemon twist, as garnish
Stir over ice and strain into a cocktail glass. Add the garnish.

A lovely cocktail.

I’ve also really enjoyed re-imagining the Judgette Cocktail with Old World Spirits Indian Blood Peach Eau-de-Vie:

Judgette
3/4 oz Peach Eau-de-Vie,
3/4 oz Dry Vermouth,
3/4 oz DryGin
dash Lemon
dash simple.

Stir, Strain. Orange Peel.

They are all a tad finicky, with their dashes of this or that, very much the sort of cocktail I enjoy rocking, but other bartenders probably hate. Anyway, something about the Western Rose just didn’t quite do it for me. Either the Judgette or the Gin Blossom would be preferable.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Wembley Cocktail (No. 1)

Wembley Cocktail (No. 1)
1 Dash Apricot Brandy. (1/2 tsp R&W Blumme Marillen)
2 Dashes Calvados (1 tsp Montreuil Calvados Reserve)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Dry Vermouth)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Beefeater Gin)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Squeeze lemon peel over glass and drop in.)

Kind of a strange bird, the Wembley (No. 1). Really just a Martini with a few dashes of Apple Brandy and, uh, Apricot Eau-de-Vie…

OK, I was cheating, I probably should have used Apricot Liqueur in this.

But it just seemed more pleasant, and more intense, to use an Eau-de-Vie.

It’s just a half teaspoon (generously) of either one, that little Apricot Liqueur is going to have very little impact.

How is it? Well a fairly dry, yet still somewhat fruity Martini.

How you feel about it, will likely depend on how you feel about Martinis and polluting them with ingredients other than Gin and Vermouth.

Certainly no more sacrilegious than the Dirty Martini, just going in another direction.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.