Orange Fizz

Orange Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Orange. (Juice 1 Tangerine)
The Juice of 1/4 Lemon or 1/2 Lime. (Juice 1 Meyer Lemon)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Leopold’s Gin)
(1 tsp. Rich Simple Syrup)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda.

Another of the many Savoy Fizzes which seem to stem from Hugo Ensslin’s 1916 “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”, Ensslin gives the recipe as, “Juice ½ Orange; Juice ½ Lime; Juice ½ Lemon; Drink El Bart Gin. Made and served as directed for plain Gin Fizz.”

Ensslin’s Fizzes are very interesting, at least to me, for their use of multiple citrus. In this case, you’ve got Lemon, Lime, and Orange. Outside of so called “Exotic Drinks” you rarely see such variety of citrus called for in drink recipes. Interesting that Ensslin’s recipes pre-date the whole Exotic drink movement by about 30 years. Unlike Vic or Don, in 1916 New York City he probably wasn’t calling on a nostalgia for time spent in the South Sea or the Caribbean for these drinks. Makes you wonder where the inspiration came from.

I did slightly switch up the juices. I only had a Tangerine and some Meyer Lemons. Figured a whole Tangerine amounts to about the juice of a half orange.

Some friends have an enormous Meyer Lemon tree in their back yard which they think must date back at least to the 1940s. It is very nearly weighted down year round with a bumper crop of 100s of lemons. The peels are wonderfully fragrant, much more so than most super market Meyer Lemons, and the juice a tad more acidic than I usually expect from Meyers. I figured the juice of one medium size Meyer Lemon about equaled the souring power of the juice of 1/2 Lemon and 1/2 Lime.

Ensslin neglects to mention any sweetener in this recipe and I’m not sure if it is assumed from the direction, “Made and served as directed for plain Gin Fizz.”

However, I couldn’t quite hang with NO sweetener for the Orange Fizz. If you can, you’re a better man (or woman) than I.

An enjoyable, refreshing drink, I wouldn’t scold you if you embellished this with a touch of bitters, but on the other hand, with great citrus and a light hand on the soda and sweetener, it’s hard to argue with it on a hot day.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

New Orleans Fizz

Get home, prep for Gemelli with Chard and Hot Italian Sausage. Prep done, whip up the New Orleans Fizz, aka Ramos Gin Fizz.

New Orleans Gin Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lemon, Juice 1/2 Lime)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (generous 1 TBSP Rich Simple Syrup)
The White of 1 Egg. (1 Egg White)
1 Glass of Dry Gin. (2 oz Plymouth Gin)
3 Dashes Fleur d’Orange. (1/2 tsp Orange Flower Water)
1 Tablespoonful of Sweet Cream. (1 TBSP Whipping Cream)
Shake well, strain into long tumbler and fill with syphon soda water.

One of the most iconic drinks of New Orleans, the Ramos Fizz is just a rather elaborate Gin Fizz. Instead of just including Cream or Egg White, it includes Cream AND Egg white.

Legendarily, Henry Ramos used to have a line of drink shakers standing on hand, each to do a portion of the shaking of the drink, it needs to be shaken so well and so long.

I did my best, giving it almost a full minute of shaking, making for a somewhat tedious video.

Well, you had New Orleans legend Mr. Dave Bartholomew to listen to while I was shaking, so how can you complain too much?

Finish making pasta:

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Hoffman Fizz

Dinner Prep

Prep for Fusilli with Summer Vegetables.

Hoffman Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lime, Juice 1/2 Lemon)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (1 Teaspoon Rich Simple Syrup)
1 Glass Gin. (2 oz Leopold’s Gin)
Shake well strain into medium size glass and fill with sypon soda water. Add teaspoonful of Grenadine (1 Teaspoon Small Hand Foods Grenadine).

Similar to the Albemarle Fizz, but with Grenadine instead of Raspberry Syrup. I have to admit, as much as I like Small Hand Foods Grenadine, there was something just a bit nicer about the Albemarle. Maybe the fragrance of the Raspberries? Grenadine makes a drink that is just a tad leaner than one made with Raspberry Syrup.

The music in the video is from a new CD by The Thing with Jim O’Rourke called, “Shinjuku Growl”.

Fusilli with Kabocha Squash, small tomatoes, Snap Peas, and corn. AKA leftovers pasta. Really tasty, all the same.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Grand Royal Fizz

Grand Royal Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lemon, Juice 1/2 Lime)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (Uh, ooops, forgot)
1 Glass Gin. (2 oz Plymouth Gin)
2 Dashes Maraschino. (1 tsp. Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur)
The Juice of 1/4 Orange. (Juice 1/4 Orange)
1 Tablespoonful Sweet Cream. (1/4 oz Heavy Cream)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

Another recipe from Hugo Ensslin’s 1916, “Recipes for Mixed Drinks” 1916-1917, he gives the recipe as, “Made same as plain Gin Fizz, adding: 1 dash Maraschino; 3 dashes Orange Juice; ½ pony Cream.”

Again, Mr. Ensslin’s recipe for the Gin Fizz is as follows:

Gin Fizz
Juice of ½ Lime;
Juice ½ Lemon;
1 tablespoon of Powdered Sugar;
1 drink Dry Gin.

Shake well in a mixing glass with cracked ice, strain into fizz glass, fill up with carbonated or any sparkling water desired.

OK, I forgot the extra “Powdered Sugar”. Oops. Anyway, this was nicely tart without the extra sweetener. I take back my previous comment about tasting like Yoghurt being a bad thing.

Anyway, this is kind of like a Ramos (aka New Orleans) Fizz without the Egg White and with Maraschino Liqueur instead of Orange Flower Water. To be honest, I’m not sure any of those things are exactly bad. While Luxardo Maraschino is a little finicky, it’s nowhere near the problem ingredient that Orange Flower Water can be. Even with the Cream, Mrs. Flannestad approved of the Grand Royal Fizz.

Though the last time we did a “Grand Royal” drink, it was the “Grand Royal Clover Club” (Made by Ms. Josey Packard at Alembic Bar way back in April of 2008!) and it included a whole egg, not cream. Savoy Cocktail Book, inconsistent as ever.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Gin Fizz

Gin Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (generous teaspoon Caster Sugar)
1 Glass Gin. (2 oz Junipero Gin)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

A while ago, my neighborhood blog Bernalwood was kind enough to feature one of my cocktail posts:

This Weekend’s Coktail is yesterday’s Tom Collins

In the comments section, someone remarked:

friscolex: “Hurray for good cocktails. I have to fight tooth and nail to get a gin fizz in SF so maybe I’ll just switch, although the Rob Roy IMO is the Perfect Manhattan.
In re: gin fizz dearth: I have tried EVERY schmancy cocktail joint and have basically given up because I inevitably get “schooled” by the bartender who gives me a Ramos fizz or silver fizz. I’ve stopped short of printing out a few copies of the recipes from a classic cocktail book because that just seems ridiculous. Luckily those bars usually have Anchor on tap!”

It’s always sort of interesting when a certain style of drink comes to represent a category and optional ingredients become de rigueur. How did muddled fruit end up in an old fashioned? Egg White in a Whisk(e)y Sour? And to the point, “How did Egg White end up the default in the Gin Fizz?”

So let’s get this out of the way, a properly made Plain Gin Fizz does not have egg white. A “Plain Gin Fizz” is Gin, Lemon Juice (maybe lime juice), Sugar, and Soda Water. If you add egg white to a fizz, you are making what is called a Silver Fizz.

A lot of people like egg white in their Gin Fizzes, and, as indicated above, some don’t.

But let’s face it, no one can know everything about drinks. But in this case, the customer seems to know more about Gin Fizzes than the bartender. But, even if the bartender was right about the default Gin Fizz having Egg White, it’s up to him (or her) to serve the customer the drink they want, not the drink the bartender likes to make. I mean, if all I did was serve drinks I like, everyone would get Beer, Manhattans, or a Slug of Booze. What fun would that be?

What I like to do, unless a drink is written on the menu as containing Egg White, is to make sure that the customer wants their Gin Fizz (or Whiskey Sour) with Egg White when they order the drink. Say something like, “The house Gin Fizz is made with Egg White, is that all right with you?” Just to be on the safe side. Alternatively, as a customer, you should be able to ask for a, “Plain Gin Fizz, no Egg White.” If you get hassled for that order, definitely stick with the Anchor Steam.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Cream Fizz

Cream Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (Generous teaspoon Caster Sugar)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Plymouth Gin)
1 Teaspoonful Fresh Cream. (1 teaspoonful Whipping Cream)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with soda water.

Still mucking about with the iSi CO2 soda siphon. Just haven’t figured out anything better.

I tried calling and emailing Selzer Sisters a couple weeks ago, and even though I see their delivery van in Bernal Heights every night, I haven’t heard back.

A lot of friends have recommended the Soda Stream option, but it’s a bit expensive, and I don’t like the fact that the closure is a screw top instead of a valve. Once you open, you’re pretty much committed to drinking the whole liter of soda.

Another option would be buying a case of Fever Tree Soda Water. Except I haven’t found anyone selling the Fever Tree Soda Water, just their Ginger Ale, Ginger Beer, Tonic, and Bitter Lemon. And I am certainly not going to pay to have fizzy water shipped from somewhere.

So, iSi soda siphon it is. I get decent results by a) using chilled and filtered water. b) allowing it to stand overnight after charging.

On the previous Brandy Fizz and here on the Cream Fizz, I went a little light on the sugar. I am coming to the conclusion, with the dilution and slight acidity of the soda water, you really can’t do that and have the drink have a full flavor. It just tastes like watery lemonade, not appealing.

Anyway, Cream in this one, instead of egg. There are a few fizzes like that, including the upcoming Peach Blow Fizz, not sure what the appeal is. It’s not a whole lot of cream, only a teaspoon, so it’s not like having a Milk Punch or anything. But it does foam slightly and give a dairy flavor to the drink. With the lemon, it’s almost yoghurt-ish. Again, another reason not to go light on the sugar, better custard than yoghurt.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Alabama Fizz

First, just a reminder that Sunday, June 26, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails, (they also have a great beer selection,) on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders, (and me,) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Chicken, EdaMame, and Noodle Stir-Fry

“From “Fresh Flavor Fast,” by Everyday Food, from the kitchens of Martha Stewart Living.”

Really, San Francisco Chronicle, a Stir-Fry, “from the kitchens of Martha Stewart Living,” is the best you can do? Isn’t that sort of like making a French style recipe from Rick Bayless? A Creole recipe from Grant Achatz? A Mexican recipe from Sandra Lee?

Mrs. Flannestad was taken with the idea of an Edamame and noodle stir-fry, so I set about making this bland recipe a bit more interesting, without making it any less “Fast” or “Fresh”. I may also be a White Ghost, but I think I can push this dish a bit more in the direction of my concept of actual Chinese Food.

Revised Chicken, EdaMame, and Noodle Stir-Fry

INGREDIENTS:

Chicken Marinade
2 Tablespoons Soy Sauce
1 Tablespoon Chinese Rice Wine
1 Tablespoon Water
dash Sesame Oil
1 teaspoon Corn Starch

Sauce
1/2 Cup Chicken Stock
3 Tablespoons Soy Sauce
2 Tablespoons Chinese Rice Wine
2 Dashes Chinese Black Vinegar
1/2 teaspoon Sesame Oil

1 Tablespoon Cornstarch combined dissolved with 1 Tablespoon of water

Minced Seasonings
1 Tablespoon Ginger, minced
1 Tablespoon Garlic, minced
1 Tablespoon Green Onions, minced

1 Tablespoon Hot Chile Bean Paste

1/2 Chicken Breast, trimmed and sliced
2 Baby Bok Choy heads, Washed and Sliced
1 package Eda Mame, thawed
1/2 package Udon Noodles
Cilantro, washed, stemmed and chopped
Peanut or other vegetable oil

Prep done, I started to get set up for the weekly video. If you look closely, you can see the marinating chicken in the upper left corner.

I was talking to Mrs. Flannestad about the recent videos and she was less than approving. She felt like I’d traded in what was cool about them for the same dumb talking head shit that everyone else who is making cocktail videos does. I see her point.

FIZZES.

Wow, the last big section of drinks. This has to be the Savoy Home Stretch: Fizzes. Coolers. Rickeys. Daisies. Fixes. Juleps. Smashes. Cobblers. Frappe. Punches. Cups!

Alabama Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lemon)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (Generous Teaspoon Caster Sugar)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Plymouth Gin)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and Fill with soda water. Add 2 sprigs of Fresh Mint.

As I was stripping the sprigs of mint to use as garnish, it occurred to me that I could throw the leaves into the mixing tin for a little extra mint zest in the drink. Shortly thereafter, I realized that the Alabama Fizz is pretty much exactly a South Side Cocktail.

As most of the Fizzes seem to come from Hugo Ensslin’s book and the South Side from Harry McElhone, I’m not sure who to exactly credit for the genius of this drink.

But, South Side Cocktail or Alabama Fizz, this is a delicious drink.

Music in the background is from the Harmonia album, “Tracks and Traces“.

Drink made, I set about to cooking dinner.

Revised Chicken, EdaMame, and Noodle Stir-Fry

METHOD:

Combine marinade with chicken, and toss to coat. Put on water to boil the udon noodles, while you do the rest of the prep. Cook until slightly underdone and rinse well. Set aside. Over medium heat, add 1 tsp peanut oil to your wok, and swirl to coat surface. When the peanut oil is heated until smoking, add 1/4 cup more oil to wok. Drain marinade from Chicken. When oil is smoking hot, add half the chicken to the oil and quickly cook. Remove chicken from oil and set aside. Heat oil again and add rest of chicken to cook. Remove chicken from oil, pour all but 1 tablespoon of oil from wok. Heat until smoking and add Minced Seasonings. Cook until fragrant and add Chile Bean Paste. Add Eda Mame and toss. Add Sauce and bring to a simmer. Add Chicken and simmer briefly. Add Bok Choy and when it is again hot, stir in corn starch slurry. Add noodles, toss to coat, and pour out onto serving plate. Sprinkle over Cilantro.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Tom Collins

First, just a reminder that Sunday, May 22, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails, (they also have a great beer selection,) on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders, (and me,) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Tom Collins
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar.
1 Glass Dry Gin.
Shake well and strain into long tumbler. Add 1 lump ice and split of soda water.

The Tom Collins above was prepared by Rosa at the excellent bar and restaurant Bar Agricole, using Leopold’s Gin. I didn’t get the exact measurements, but she said something like, “Leopold’s Gin, 2-1, with dashes of house made stonefruit bitters.” They were very busy and I didn’t want to hassle her too much. Anyway, it was a delightful and refreshing quaff, I highly recommend stopping Bar Agricole for their Tom Collins, (or their great food.)

I’ve covered the history of the Tom Collins before, in the post about the Conduit Street Punch, so I won’t repeat that information. Short version, the Collins probably started a long time ago as a proper Gin Punch based on Dutch Gin (aka Genever), by the late 19th Century it was a long drink made  Old-Tom Gin, lemon, sugar and soda. By the 1930s, Old Tom was largely extinct and Tom Collins were being made with plain old London Dry Gin.

Sometimes we’ll get asked about the difference between this drink and that during our Savoy Night events. What’s the difference between a Daisy and the Fix or what exactly is the difference between a Collins and a Gin Fizz? I mean aside from the fact that a Tom Collins is served in a Collins glass and a Gin fizz in Gin Fizz Glass?

As we’ll see in a couple weeks, this is the recipe for a Gin Fizz:

Gin Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar.
1 Glass Gin.
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

That’s, yes, pretty much exactly the same ingredients, the same amounts, and nearly the same instructions as for the Tom Collins.

Many modern bartenders will differentiate that the Collins is built in the glass, while the Fizz is shaken and strained. However, it appears that this was not the case at the time the Savoy Cocktail Book was written (or before). Though the Savoy bartenders were apparently using teaspoons of dry sugar, so they really had no choice but to shake.

No, the big difference, as far as I can tell, is that the Collins is usually served over ice, while the fizz is served without ice.

But the other elephant in the room is how much soda is needed to “fill” either the Tom Collins Glass or the Gin Fizz Glass?

While the Savoy Cocktail Book was not particularly detail oriented regarding glassware (or garnishes, or much of anything,) fortunately another book published at around the same time, Patrick Gavin Duffy’s “The Official Mixer’s Manual,” was. He goes so far as to give the reader an illustrated guide to glassware and then indicate with every drink recipe which glass it should be served in. And, even better, he gives some volumes for the glassware.

In the figure above, glass number 10 is the Tom Collins glass, while glass number 12 is what Duffy calls the “Eight Oz. Highball”. This is the glass he directs you to use for fizzes. So if the illustration is to scale, and the “Highball” holds Eight Ounces, it looks like the Tom Collins Glass holds about 12-14 Ounces.

With “One Lump of Ice”, you are getting a lot more soda, almost an entire 10 oz split probably, in your Tom Collins, making it a much milder drink than a Gin Fizz. So that’s the difference, not the Gin, not the lemon, not the sugar, but the size of the glass, the ice, and the amount of soda.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Zaza Cocktail

Believe it or not, after the Zaza, only 2 more drinks left in the “Cocktail” section of the Savoy Cocktail Book!

751 Savoy “Cocktails” made, tasted, photographed, and blogged between June of 2006 and March of 2011.

Whew!

…Of course, then on to the remaining 137 assorted Coolers, Daisies, Fixes, Fizzes, Punches, Rickeys, etc. and the Addenda to the Second edition of the book.

No rest for the wicked.

Zaza Cocktail
1/2 Dubonnet. (1 1/2 oz Dubonnet Rouge)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Junipero Gin)
(1 dash Angostura Bitters)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Squeeze lemon peel over glass and drop in.)
Source: Hugo Ensslin, “Recipes for Mixed Drinks” 1916-1917

Like the first time I made this, oh so many years ago, as the Dubonnet Cocktail, I found the mixture of half gin and half Dubonnet Rouge a bit plain. Thus, I always feel a bit justified in adding a dash of bitters and a citrus peel to the drink.

Definitely cures the plain Jane nature of this cocktail and slightly elevates it.

Hm, many possibilities for the name, “Zaza,” from a people of a certain region of Turkey to a reservoir on the Zaza River in Sancti Spiritus, Cuba.

However, since this comes from New York bartender Hugo Ensslin’s 1916, “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”, I’m going to guess this was named after the play or movie, “Zaza”.

From the wikipedia article about Zaza:

Zaza is a play, originally written by French playwrights Pierre Berton and Charles Simon, but probably best known in the English-speaking world in the 1898 adaptation by David Belasco. The title character is a prostitute who becomes a music hall entertainer and the mistress of a married man. According to the IMDb, it was produced on stage and in film six times between 1913 and 1956.

Colorful enough to capture the imagination and the time period fits Ensslin’s book.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Zanzibar Cocktail

The countdown to the last “Cocktail” continues.

Say it with me, “FOUR!”

Zanzibar Cocktail
(6 People)
The Juice of 1 1/2 Lemons. (1/2 oz Lemon Juice)
1 Glass Gin. (1/2 oz Anchor Junipero Gin)
3 Glasses French Vermouth. (1 1/2 oz Perucchi Vermouth Blanco)
1 or 2 Dessertspoonsful Sugar Syrup. (Pinch Caster Sugar)
If desired, 1 Spoonful Orange Bitters. (3 dash orange bitters)
Shake well and serve with a piece of lemon rind.

With the sweetness of the Perucchi Vermouth Blanco, I went light on the sweetener in the Zanzibar.

This is an interesting cocktail, essentially a Vermouth Sour with a touch of gin, it’s really quite enjoyable. Light and refreshing, it is nearly the polar opposite of the short sharp shock of a traditional Gin Sour. A great aperitif Cocktail, and another to add to the list of enjoyable Savoy Low Alcohol Beverages.

Since we were going light on the amount of Gin in this cocktail, I also didn’t feel shy about using something as strong and juniper heavy as the Anchor Junipero.

Recommended.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.