Dukes Martin[i,ez]

“You gotta have the Dukes Martini! It’s a thing. They have a cart.”

Martini Cart

When famed journalist and international traveler Camper English tells you, you have to try a thing, you probably should, at least once!

Well, if it is drink related, anyway.

So, yes, the Dukes Hotel Bar has a Martini Cart. This system, I believe originated when Salvatore Calabrese was the head barman at the Dukes Bar.

When you order a Martini, (or Martinez,) the bartender, in this case the wonderful Alessandro Palazzi, rolls the cart out to your table with what he will need to make your cocktail, including frozen glassware, Vermouth, and very, very chilled Gin.

Alesandro Mixes

His first step is to dash into your glass a little custom vermouth, “made with English wine”. If you desire your Martini or Martinez “Wet” he will leave the dashes of vermouth in the glass. Otherwise, it is just a rinse. Next he raises a frosted bottle of Gin and pours a health measure into the glass. Finally, he finishes the Martini by cutting a wide swath of peel from a lemon and squeezing it over the glass.

Dukes Martinez

Just don’t have more than one, if you have plans for the rest of your evening!

Eeyore’s Requiem

When we visited The Violet Hour a couple years ago, one of the favorite drinks we tried there was called “Eeyore’s Requiem”.

It’s a little bit of an odd drink, most drinks are made with the bulk of their ingredients being Spirits.

With Eeyore’s Requiem, it is kind of the reverse. Most of the drink is various bitter Italian liqueurs, or Amaros, and vermouth with the minor part of the drink being Gin.

I later learned that the cocktail was created by Toby Maloney, aka Alchemist on eGullet.org, for The Violet Hour. The recipe was published in a few places, including Serious Eats and eGullet.org.

Eeyore's Requiem

Eeyore’s Requiem

Eeyore’s Requiem

1 1/2 oz Campari
1 oz Dolin Blanc Vermouth
1/2 oz Dry Gin
1/4 oz Cynar
1/4 oz Fernet Branca
15 drops Miracle Mile Orange Bitters

Stir on ice until well chilled and strain into a cocktail glass. Express a peel of an orange over the glass, and garnish with a ‘pig tail’ orange peel.

To make the ‘pig tail’ orange garnish, start with a whole orange. Using a channel knife cut, make continuous spiral cut of peel, as you can see in the picture above.

For all the rough and tumble of the bitter ingredients of this drink, it is surprisingly smooth.

For what is is worth, it’s a bit rich, maybe a better after dinner, than before, dinner drink.

Or if you’re serving it before, lighten it with a bit of sparkling water or wine.

In either case, it is delicious!

Shady Grove Cooler

Shady Grove Cooler
1/2 Tablespoonful of Sugar. (1/2 Tablespoon of Rich Simple Syrup)
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lemon)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Junipero Gin)
(Shake and Strain.) Use long tumbler, and fill with Ginger Beer (Fever Tree Ginger Beer).

The Gin Based predecessor to the Moscow Mule: Vodka, Lime and Ginger Beer?

Why is this a “Cooler” and that a “Mule”?

Well, as far as the Savoy Cocktail Book is concerned, the popular category of drinks we now call the Mule, (long drinks with citrus and Ginger Beer,) doesn’t really exist. Most of them are their own singularly named drinks, or they are “Coolers”.

So I suppose if you were putting this on a menu these days, you’d call it a Gin Mule instead of a Shady Grove Cooler. Of course, if you add Mint you’ve got something similar to Marco Dionysos’ Ginger Rogers or Audrey Saunders’ Gin Gin Mule.

Though I have a certain fondness for the name Shady Grove Cooler, perhaps due to its similarity to the name of a Pavement song.

Well, in any case, it’s a refreshing drink, a great song, and another section of the Savoy Cocktail Book done. On to the Rickey.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Sea Breeze Cooler

Sea Breeze Cooler
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1 very small Lemon)
2 Dashes Grenadine. (1 teaspoon Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1/2 Apricot Brandy. (1 oz Brizard ‘Apry’ Apricot Liqueur)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz North Shore Distiller’s No 6 Gin)
1 Lump of ice.
Use long tumbler and fill with soda Water. 2 sprigs fresh mint on top.

Usually, the modern Sea Breeze, which I associate with the 1970s for some reason, is made up of Vodka, Cranberry Juice, and Grapefruit, shaken and served on the rocks with a lime wedge garnish.

Well, this ain’t that drink, and I am unclear if there is any causal relationship between the two.

On the other hand, though the Sea Breeze Cooler is fairly mild, I actually quite enjoyed it. It is slightly girly with that name and the pinkness, but on a hot day it seems like it would be refreshing.

I chose the North Shore No. 6, as it has on many occasions proven to be friendly to citrus and apricot. It did not disappoint.

I did throw a few of the stripped mint leaves into the drink when I shook it. Then I did not strain it through a fine sieve, which was a serious error. You can now see a fine layer of pulverized mint leaves floating on top of the drink, just waiting to get stuck between your date’s teeth. Never good.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Long Tom Cooler

Long Tom Cooler
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lemon)
1/2 Tablespoonful Sugar. (1/2 Tablespoon of Rich Simple Syrup, or to taste)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Ransom Old Tom Gin)
(dash Angostura Orange Bitters)
Shake well, strain into long tumbler, add 1 lump of ice, and fill with soda water.

Again, the Savoy editors did not do a particularly good job of translating a recipe from Hugo Ensslin’s 1916 “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”:

Long Tom Cooler.
1 pony Sugar Syrup;
Juice of ½ Lemon;
1 drink El Bart Gin.
Shake well in a mixing glass with cracked ice, strain into a Collins glass, add a cube of ice and 1 slice of Orange, fill up with Club Soda.

And again, moronically, I failed to look at Ensslin’s book before making the drink, or this would have looked a bit different.

Anyway, the other Savoy Night at Alembic Bar, a friend asked me for a drink that was “not too alcoholic”, and this sprung immediately to mind. Basically a dry-ish lemonade with a generous pour of soda and a splash of gin, this is a very refreshing and mild hot weather drink.

However, there may be a slight problem with serving a drink called “Long Tom” to a male customer. My advice? Don’t do it, unless you’re sure your gesture won’t be misinterpreted.

And, yes, there is basically no difference between a Long Tom Cooler and a Tom Collins, maybe the Long Tom is a bit sweeter? Anyway, for the record, while there are many similar drinks to the Tom Collins in Ensslin’s book, he does not specifically include instructions for making one.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Lone Tree Cooler

Lone Tree Cooler
The Juice of 1/4 Lemon. (Juice 1/4 Lemon)
The Juice of 1 Orange. (Juice 1 orange)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Hayman’s Old Tom Gin)
1 Liqueur Glass Grenadine. (1 oz Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
(2 dash Absinthe Verte)
Shake well strain into tumbler and fill with soda water.

I dunno, I just felt like a little Absinthe would add some interest to this rather odd recipe. Vermouth in a Cooler? Juice of 1 Orange? Anyway, it’s another cocktail where I wish I had cracked a book and done some research before making it…

As usual, the theoretical source for this recipe was Hugo Ensslin’s 1916, “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”.

However, Hugo’s recipe is hugely different:

Lone Tree Cooler
Juice of 1 Lemon;
Juice of ¼ Orange;
Pony Grenadine.

Made and served same as Apricot Cooler.

Righto. Well, there you go, cough, no booze at all, that’s way too brazen to be a typo. I guess whomever wrote the Savoy Cocktail Book felt the Lone Tree Cooler was good, but needed a little something to juice it up, like Gin and Dry Vermouth. Of course, then I came along and felt like it needed even a little more electricity, a la Maurice, and added Absinthe.

It is a wonder the same drink gets made the same way in more than once!

Ha! Sometimes I wonder if the same drink IS ever made more than once!

Well, if you’re looking for a non-alcoholic drink, you could certainly do worse than this lemonade sweetened with Grenadine, or, alternatively, slightly tarted up Shirley Temple.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Texas Fizz

Texas Fizz
The Juice of 1/4 Orange. (Juice 1/2 Tangerine)
The Juice of 1/4 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lime)
1 Teaspoonful Powdered Sugar. (Generous teaspoon Rich Simple Syrup)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz North Shore Distiller’s Gin No. 6)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

I am not quite sure why exactly this is a “Texas” Fizz. I guess they do grow a fair amount of citrus there, though I more strongly associate them with Grapefruit.

I massaged it a bit, using the juice of half a Tangerine and half a lime, instead of the 1/4 Lemon and 1/4 Orange it calls for. Ended up pretty tasty.

When I started making these I was still using water from a Britta Pitcher and often found the ice had off flavors. We recently invested in a new more effective filter which attaches to the faucet. The ice is way better. It’s funny, you generally think of cocktails as having fairly big flavors, a little off flavor from the ice isn’t going to ruin anything. Most modern, over driven cocktails probably fall into that category, there’s so much going on you probably wouldn’t notice some off flavor from the ice. On the other hand, with a four ingredient, fairly subtle drink like this and these fizzes, any off flavors from ice, or anything else, are right up there in front.

The easiest way I’ve ever found to find out what your ice tastes like is to pour a few ounces of cold water into your cocktail shaker. Add ice. Shake and strain it into a glass just as if you were making a cocktail. Does the chilled water taste good? If it doesn’t, that same ice isn’t going to be contributing anything good to your cocktails either.

So how about the Texas Fizz?

It’s kind of good, refreshing and light. It’s not a mind blowing cocktail, but it’s also not blowing out your taste buds with your first sip. You drink it and think, “That was nice, what’s next?”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Silver Fizz

First, just a reminder that Sunday, August 28, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails, (they also have a great beer selection,) on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders, (and me,) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Silver Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Meyer Lemon, Juice 1/2 Lime)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (Generous Teaspoon Rich Simple Syrup)
l Glass Gin. (2 oz Junipero Gin)
The White of 1 Egg.
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

Do I need to mention that the recipe for this drink was published in Hugo Ensslin’s 1916 “Recipes for Mixed Drinks before the Savoy Cocktail Book? His recipe is minimal: “Made same as plain Gin Fizz, adding the white of an egg.”

I have nothing against Egg White in Fizzes, but just to reiterate, a “plain Gin Fizz” does NOT have Egg White.

However, a Silver Fizz DOES have egg white.

All those Egg White containing Gin Fizzes being served at modern fancy cocktail bars are, in fact, Silver Fizzes. And fine, fine drinks they are indeed.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Royal Fizz

Royal Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Meyer Lemon, Juice 1/2 Lime)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (1 TBSP Rich Simple Syrup)
1 Glass Gin. (2 oz Junipero Gin)
1 Egg. (1 Egg)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

Yet another Fizz from Hugo Ensslin’s 1916 “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”, about this Fizz he says, “Made same as plain Gin Fizz, adding the whole of one Egg.”

I do think a whole egg is a little much, with modern eggs as large as they are. Suggest hunting down “Medium” eggs or even just using half a Large or Extra-Large Egg.

Like cream drinks, whole egg drinks sometimes draw the askance look from those perusing the book.

Personally, I like Flips and their Citrus laden brethern, the Egg Sour and Royal Fizz. Heck, even the ones with just Egg Yolks, like the Bosom Caresser are kind of nice.

Well, as they say, your mileage may vary.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Peach Blow Fizz

Peach Blow Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon or 1 Lime (Juice 1/2 Lemon AND juice 1/2 Lime)
4 Mashed Strawberries. (6 Mashed Raspberries)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (Generous Tablespoon Rich Simple Syrup)
1 Tablespoonful Sweet Cream. (1 Tablespoon Heavy Whipping Cream)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Plymouth Gin)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

Another of the Fizzes sourced from Hugo Ensslin’s 1916 “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”, the original recipe is slightly different from the Savoy Cocktail Book:

Peach Blow Fizz: Juice ½ Lime; Juice ½ Lemon; 4 Strawberries, mashed up; 1 teasponful Powdered Sugar; 1 drink Gin; 1 Pony Cream. Made and served as directed for plain Gin Fizz.

Again you see Ensslin calling for more than one type of citrus. His recipe also calls for a bit more cream, generally a “Pony” is considered an ounce.

The Peach Blow Fizz is one of those puzzling cocktails. First off, there’s the whole “Blow” thing, that, as far as I know nobody really understands. Second there’s the “Peach” thing. Why is this a “Peach Blow Fizz” without any peaches?

I have no idea.

What I can tell you is, the Peach Blow Fizz is a delicious species of Fizz.

The cream sometimes freaks people, well men, out. One Savoy Cocktail Book night, a friend was in and interested in Savoy Cocktails with Strawberries. He’d tried the Bloodhound and I’d garnished his King Cole with Strawberries (Fernet and Strawberries, a great combination, by the way) and was looking for a Third drink before calling it a night. I mentioned the Peach Blow Fizz, and he said, “Oooh, that has cream, doesn’t it?” So that was a no go.

Anyway, I think I ended up making a non-strawberry drink, Jabberwock or something, but I was a little sad he didn’t man up and just drink the pink fruity concoction. It’s not like it has a lot of Cream, or anything. It’s no Grasshopper or Brandy Alexander.

Oh, yeah, Raspberries. I forgot to buy strawberries, so substituted frozen raspberries this time. A change I do heartily recommend.

Tasty, pink, fruity, and boozy, it’s actually a pretty serious drink, for all its girliness.

Heh, one of these days, I’m going to have to try it out when I get an order for a Gin and citrus Bartender’s choice, not too sweet. I bet they’ll love it.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.