Night Cap Cocktail

Night Cap Cocktail

Night Cap Cocktail

The Yolk of 1 Egg.
1/3 Anisette. (3/4 oz Gantous and Abou Rad Arak)
1/3 Curacao. (3/4 oz Cointreau)
1/3 Brandy. (3/4 oz Dudognon Cognac)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I’ve written about “Arak” before in the post “Ar(r)a(c)k Disambiguation“. This is the Anise flavored grape spirit from Lebanon.  Because there are various degrees of sweetness in Anisette and Anise flavored liqueurs and this drink is already 1/3 orange liqueur, I figured it would be fun to pretend it called for a dry style anise liqueur and use Arak instead of Anisette.

The Night Cap is also a fine example of me not being able to follow a recipe even though I try hard to read them and execute. I knew I was running low on Cointreau, so stopped to buy some on the way home.

Then I looked at the recipe. Checked for the Orange Curacao in the kitchen cupboard. Headed down to the basement to find the Arak. Came back upstairs and made the recipe with Cointreau. Why, I do not know.  Sometimes my hands just don’t tell my brain what they are doing.

So, even though I didn’t really quite make the recipe accurately, ooops, this was quite tasty.  Anise and orange are a proven great combination and the brandy brings some sort of other mediation to the party.  Definitely an enjoyable cocktail, so  I can’t see going back and doing it the “right” way.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Napoleon Cocktail

Napoleon Cocktail

Napoleon Cocktail

1 Dash Fernet Branca. (1/3 tsp. Fernet Branca)
1 Dash Curacao. (1/3 tsp. Bols Dry Orange Curacao)
1 Dash Dubonnet. (1/3 tsp. Vergano Lulli Americano)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Beefeater Gin)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

As we’ve noted, while there were a number of civilized fifty-fifty martini type drinks on the menu before and after prohibition, there was also no shortage of, “Hey! That’s just booze in that glass!” drinks either.

If I were you, I’d go a bit long on those dashes. As measured above, this tasted pretty much like a big, cold glass of gin.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Morning Glory Cocktail

Repeal Bitters

One of the really spiffy things about writing this pesky Savoy topic is that occasionally people you’ve met send you really cool stuff.

The other day I got an email from Stephan Berg, one of the proprietors of The Bitter Truth asking for my address. Having met him at Tales of the cocktail, he didn’t seem particularly menacing. So I figured it would be safe to send him my contact info.

Repeal Bitters Back Label

The Bitter Truth Guys, Alexander Hauke and Stephan Berg, had recently released a Celery Seed Bitters and a reproduction of Jerry Thomas Decanter Bitters. I suppose I had an idle hope that they might send me some of those.

Instead they sent a brand new product, which they have created to honor the 75th Anniversary of the Repeal of Prohibition.

The Repeal Day bitters are quite complex. The initial flavors and scents are clove which give way to a front of mouth bitter flavor. Secondary flavors which come forward after that initial bitter burst are similar to root beer. I don’t get much, if any citrus. Instead other flavors similar to culinary herbs and more bitterness linger in the aftertaste.

If you should desire to purchase these bitters, you can either mail order them from The Bitter Truth in Germany or I’ve heard a rumor that a certain cocktail book publisher may soon be distributing them in the US.

Morning Glory Cocktail

Morning Glory Cocktail

3 Dashes Gomme Syrup. (1 tsp. rich simple syrup)
2 Dashes Curacao. (2/3 tsp. Bols Dry Orange Curacao)
2 Dashes Bitters. (2 dashes Bitter Truth Repeal Bitters)
1 Dash Absinthe. (1 dash North Shore Sirene Absinthe)
1 Liqueur Glass Brandy. (1 1/2 oz Lustau Reserve Brandy)
1 Liqueur Glass Whisky. (1 1/2 oz Anchor 2006 Hotaling’s Whiskey)
1 Piece Lemon Peel, twisted to express the oil.
Two Small Pieces of Ice.

Stir thoroughly and remove the ice. Fill the glass with seltzer water or plain soda, and stir with a teaspoon having a little sugar in it.

Well if you’ve got old-school bitters, handily, here’s an old school drink.

As we have seen, much of the Cocktail’s development was intimately connected to the search for a better hangover cure…When confronted by the “Cold grey light of dawn”, the toper recognized it as “the great necessity of the age” the he should at once take some sort of “anti-fogmatic”…”eye-opener”…”bracer”…”corpse reviver” or “morning glory”.

Quoting here from David Wondrich’s introduction to the Morning Glory Cocktail in his book, “Imbibe!

According to Wondrich, the Morning Glory Cocktail first appears in print in the 1887 edition of Jerry Thomas’ Book and is pretty much verbatim as above.

The “remove the ice idea” is a bit silly. Perhaps sensible when ice was at more of a premium than it is today. I recommend, as does Mr. Wondrich, that you simply follow a procedure similar to a Sazerac. Chill a medium size serving glass with ice and water. Stir your cocktail in ice in a mixing glass or tin. Dump the ice from the chilled serving glass. Strain your cocktail into the chilled glass. Top up with soda.

While I was getting all old-school, I figured I might as well use Anchor Distilling’s Hotaling’s Whiskey in this cocktail. Seemed like it would combine well with brandy.

And indeed. Uh, wow. After a couple sips, it felt like my scalp was floating a few feet above the top of my head.

No idea what might happen, if you follow Mr. Wondrich’s other piece of advice and listen to that, “anarchic little voice in your head that suggests substituting champagne for the selzer.”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Morning Cocktail

Morning Cocktail

Morning Cocktail

2 Dashes Curacao. (2/3 tsp Bols Dry Orange Curacao)
2 Dashes Maraschino. (2/3 tsp Luxardo Maraschino)
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (2 dashes Angostura Orange Bitters)
2 Dashes Absinthe. (1/2 tsp Sirene Absinthe Verte)
1/2 Brandy. (1 oz Lustau Reserve Brandy)
1/2 French Vermouth. (1 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)

Shake (well, if you really want to shake, shake. Recommend stirring, myself.) well and strain into cocktail glass. Add a (Mmmm… Luxardo) cherry and squeeze lemon peel on top.

This recipe is verbatim from Harry McElhone’s “Barflies and Cocktails” (and more likely “Harry’s ABCs”). McElhone credits the recipe to “Harry Johnson of New Orleans”. And indeed, it is to be found in the 1900 edition of Harry Johnson’s “Bartenders’ Manual” (Handily published by Mud Puddle Books: “Bartender’s Manual”.)

The only difference between Mr. McElhone’s and Mr. Johnson’s recipes is that Mr. McElhone calls for the Orange Bitters and Mr. Johnson calls for “3 or 4 dashes of bitters (Boker’s Genuine Only)”. Well, times change, and Boker’s Bitters probably weren’t available in London or Paris.

The recipe is a bit twiddly, with all the dashes of this and that.

In addition, I’m growing dissatisfied with the Lustau Brandy. It just doesn’t have much presence in a drink or much length or depth on its own.

Despite that, I found the Morning Cocktail genuinely enjoyable. I was really surprised how dominant the citrus flavors of the cocktail were. There’s some sort of interesting interaction going on between the Dry Vermouth, Curacao, and Lemon Twist.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Manyann Cocktail

Manyann Cocktail

Manyann Cocktail

The Juice of 1 Lemon.
2 Dashes Curacao. (generous 1 tsp. Bols Dry Orange Curacao)
1/2 Gin. (1 oz Boodles Gin)
1/2 Caperitif. (1 oz St. Raphael Aperitif Gold)

Shake well and strain into port wine glass.

In the interest of my own edification, and in the absence of Caperitif, I picked up a bottle of St. Raphael Gold, having read it was some sort of Quinquina.

Uh, hmmm….

Well, the St. Raphael Gold is interesting.

To me it tastes more like a moderately sweet, pale sherry than a Quinquina. Odd, I’ve never before tried an Aperitif Wine that reminded me this much of a Sherry.

I’m also not sure what to make of the recipe. It’s about the only one in the Savoy that combines lemon with Caperitif, so it makes me suspect that it isn’t the Caperitif providing sweetness. That it was at least a somewhat dry aperitif.

To be honest, the Manyann might be pretty refreshing with a bit more curacao, ice, and some seltzer.

As written above, I can’t say I found it rated much more than a “drinkable”.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Manhattan Cocktail (No. 1)

Manhattan Cocktail (No. 1)

Use small Bar glass.
2 Dashes Curacao or Maraschino.
1 Pony Rye Whisky.
1 Wineglass Vermouth (Mixed).
3 Dashes Angostura Bitters.
2 Small Lumps of ice.

Shake up well, and strain into a claret glass. Put a quarter of a slice of lemon In the glass and serve. If preferred very sweet add two dashes of gum syrup.

The Savoy Manhattan Cocktail (No. 1) is pretty much verbatim from the 1887 edition of Jerry Thomas’ Bar-tender’s Guide:

Manhattan Cocktail.
(Use small bar-glass.)
Take 2 dashes of Curacoa or Maraschino.
1 pony of rye whiskey.
1 wine-glass of vermouth.
3 dashes of Boker’s bitters.
2 small lumps of ice.

Shake up well, and strain into a claret glass. Put a quarter of a slice of lemon in the glass and serve. If the customer prefers it very sweet use also two dashes of gum syrup.

The only real differences being the directive to use “1 Wineglass Vermouth (Mixed)”, which I can only assume to mean a mixture of Dry and Sweet Vermouth and Angostura vs. Boker’s.

I was trying to think of way to make this a little more than, as David Wondrich describes it, “a vermouth cocktail with a stick.” The first thing that occurred to me was to use a cask strength whiskey. I contemplated the Handy, and then decided to go with the…

George T. Stagg

Yeah, well, sorry about that. On the bright side, the new Buffalo Trace Antique Collection should be available again soon. And, well, speaking of things that it is unlikely that many other people have…

Bitter Truth Boker's Bitters

Yeah, the bitter truth guys made a stab at a Boker’s replica a while ago. It’s a nice old-school bitters with a strong cardamom element.

At this point, I’m thinking, heck if I’m going to use 2 obscure ingredients, I might as well use 3…

Bols Dry Orange Curacao

So, the cocktail is:

1 teaspoon Bols Dry Orange Curacao
1 oz George T. Stagg Whiskey
1 oz Carpano Antica Vermouth
1 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth
1 tsp. Bitter Truth Boker’s Bitters

Stir with ice and strain into a cocktail glass. Lemon Peel.

Manhattan Cocktail

I wasn’t sure what to expect with this cocktail. I have to admit I’ve never gone this far into whiskey debt when making a Manhattan, nor have I ever had the courage to add that much bitters.

To be honest, it doesn’t really taste like what I think of when I imagine a Manhattan. But it is, actually, a very nice cocktail. Very complex with only a little hint of the brawn of the whiskey towards the end of the cocktail when it warms up.

Very drinkable.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

McClelland Cocktail

McClelland Cocktail

McClelland Cocktail

1 Dash Absinthe. (1/3 tsp. Kübler Absinthe)
1/3 Curacao. (3/4 oz Bols Dry Orange Curaçao. Thanks Philip!)
2/3 Sloe Gin. (1 1/2 oz Lindisfarne Sloe Gin)

Shake (or stir?) well and strain into cocktail glass.

You would think this would be pretty darn close to undrinkable. It is pretty inky. However, the bitterness and sweet tart nature of the Sloe Gin puts it not far from a Late Bottle Vintage Port. An enjoyable combination of flavors, but definitely an after dinner drink.

LindisFarne

The last time I was in England I stopped at Gerry’s Wines & Spirits and asked about Plymouth Sloe Gin. Unfortunately, they were out of stock at the time. They suggested perhaps trying the Lindisfarne and whispered, “it’s better anyway.” I dunno if it is better, but it is more intensely Sloe flavored.

Interestingly, Lindisfarne is a tidal island only accessible by boat or by road just some of the time.

A TIDAL ISLAND: Holy Island is linked to the mainland by a long causeway. Twice each day the tide sweeps in from the North Sea and covers the road. Tide times and heights can be accurately predicted from the phases of the Moon. Severe weather can produce offsets, particularly with strong winds from the North and Northeast. The causeway crossing times are forecasted ‘safe’ crossing times. Nevertheless, travellers should remain vigilant if crossing near the extremeties.

Apparently, Lindisfarne also played an important role in the Christian Church’s early days in England somewhere around 635 AD.

The Golden Age of Lindisfarne: The period of the first monastery is referred to as the “Golden Age” of Lindisfarne. Aidan and his monks came from the Irish monastery of Iona and with the support of King Oswald (based at nearby Bamburgh) worked as missionaries among the pagan English of Northumbria. In their monastery they set up the first known school in this area and introduced the arts of reading and writing, the Latin language and the Bible and other Christian books (all in Latin). They trained boys as practical missionaries who later went out over much of England to spread the Gospel.

Not sure which McClelland this cocktail might refer to. Joe McClelland seems like an English possibility. McClelland Barclay seems like a good American possibility.

Or perhaps George B. McClelland, aka Diamond Dick?

“DIAMOND DICK” IS DEAD.; George B. McClelland, Known to Boys as Hero of Many a Dime Novel.

NY Times
December 16, 1911, Saturday

Page 18, 380 words

OGDENSBURG, N.Y., Dec. 15. — Word was received here to-day of the death last night in Kansas of George B. McClelland, better known as “Diamond Dick,” famous in dime novel lore, from injuries received in being run down by a train while driving over a railroad crossing.

I guess my money’s on the last…

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Knickerbocker Special Cocktail

Knickerbocker Special Cocktail
Knickerbocker Special Cocktail

1 Teaspoonful Raspberry Syrup. (Monin Raspberry Syrup)
1 Teaspoonful Lemon Juice.
1 Teaspoonful Orange Juice.
1 Chunk of Pineapple.
2/3 Rum. (1 1/2 oz Inner Circle Green Rum)
2 Dashes of Curacao. (2/3 tsp. Luxardo Triplum)

(Muddle pineapple in juices and spirits. Ice, shake, and double strain into a cocktail glass.)

According to Mr. Wondrich’s book, “Imbibe!” The Knickerbocker was a popular cocktail in the mid to late 19th Century.

Jerry Thomas included a version of the drink in his 1862 book, which went like so:

Knickerbocker
(Use Small Bar-Glass.)
1/2 a lime or lemon, squeeze out the juice, and put rind and juice in the glass.
2 tea-spoonsfuls of Raspberry Syrup.
1 Wine-Glass Santa Cruz Rum.
1/2 Teaspoonful of Curacao.

Cool with shaved ice; shake up well, and ornament with berries in season.  If this is not sweet enough, put in a little more raspberry Syrup

Uh, oops. Well, if I had known that when I was making it, I would have given this drink the same controversial treatment I gave the King Cole!

Wondrich goes on to add about the Knickerbocker, “With its rum and its lime juice, its syrups and liqueurs, the Knickerbocker is the spiritual progenitor of the Tiki Drink. Think of it as an 1850s Mai Tai–similar drink, different island.”

Even in its, “somewhat bastardized form,” here in the Savoy Cocktail Book it is a very good drink for a hot day. A tad girly with the raspberry syrup, but with a pleasing and harmonious flavor that belies the seriousness of the rum lurking in the background.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Irish Cocktail

Irish Cocktail

Irish Cocktail

2 Dashes Absinthe. (2/3 tsp. Marteau Verte Classique Absinthe)
2 Dashes Curacao. (2/3 tsp. Luxardo Triplum)
1 Dash Maraschino. (1/3 tsp. Luxardo Maraschino)
1 dash Angostura Bitters.
1/2 Glass Irish Whisky. (1 oz Redbreast Irish Whiskey)

Shake well (stir, please) and strain into cocktail glass. Add olive and squeeze orange peel on top.

I was very tempted to double the whiskey in this one, but I restrained myself, and put it in my tiniest glass.

Pretty much an “Improved Irish Whiskey Cocktail”. To me, the portion of Absinthe seems a bit large for the small amount of Whiskey in this particular cocktail. Washing the glass with, or a single dash of, Absinthe would probably be plenty. And at that point, you’d have a very tasty cocktail indeed.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

I.B.F. Pick-Me-Up Cocktail

Note: I’m gonna run this one before the Hurricane, as it is a just about perfect New Year’s Day Cocktail.

I.B.F. Pick-Me-Up Cocktail

I.B.F. Pick-Me-Up Cocktail

In a wineglass place one lump of Ice, 3 dashes of Fernet Branca (1 tsp. Fernet), 3 dashes of Curacao (1 tsp. Luxardo Triplum), one liqueur glass of Brandy (1 1/2 oz Cerbois VSOP Armangac), fill remainder with Champagne (Louis Bouillot Cremant de Bourgogne Brut). Stir and squeeze lemon peel on cocktail glass.

According to their Blog (!) the…

International Bar Fly (IBF) was founded in 1924 by O. O. McIntyre at Harry’s New York Bar in Paris, France. Our members, known as International Bar Flies, have included Ernest Hemingway, Scott Fitzgerald, George Gershwin, Sinclair Lewis, Franklin Roosevelt, Gene Kelly, Noel Coward, Burt Lancaster, Thornton Wilder, Marlene Dietrich, Michele Morgan, Elsa Maxwell, and many more. The organization is devoted to the uplift and downfall of serious drinkers. New members are welcome.

This is a fine, fine cocktail and, apropos of New Year’s Day, a proper restorative for the drinker who may have imbibed a bit too seriously the night before. Depending on your feelings about Fernet, the I.B.F. may or may not benefit from a slightly generous hand with the teaspoon of that substance. I kind of thought it needed a little more…

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.