Breakfast Egg Nogg

Breakfast Egg Nogg
1 Fresh Egg.
1/4 Curacao. (1/2 oz Clement Creole Shrubb Liqueur)
3/4 Brandy. (1 1/2 oz Osocalis Fine Alambic Brandy)
1/4 Pint Fresh Milk. (4 oz Meyenberg Goat’s Milk)
Shake well and strain into long tumbler. Grate nutmeg on top.

Continuing with the out of season Noggs, we have another example, this one with a slightly unusual sweetener, Orange Curacao.

Though I am unclear about exactly why sweetening with Orange Liqueur instead of Sugar makes this appropriate for breakfast.

The implication of Vitamin C?

Nothing wrong with the Breakfast Nogg, but my favorite remains the Baltimore Egg Nogg.

Safety Note: As with any recipe containing uncooked eggs, there is some small chance of salmonella. If that risk bothers you, use pasteurized eggs.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Egg Sour

First, just a reminder that Sunday, April 24, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders (and me) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Egg Sour
1 Teaspoonful of Powdered White Sugar. (I skipped the extra sugar)
3 Dashes of Lemon Juice. (Very generous 3 dashes Lemon Juice. OK, really the juice of 1/2 small lemon, about 1/2 oz)
1 Liqueur Glass of Curacao. (1 1/2 oz Clement Liqueur Creole Shrubb)
1 Liqueur Glass of Brandy. (1/2 oz Germain-Robin Craft Method Brandy, 1/2 oz Germain-Robin Coast Road Reserve Brandy, 1/2 oz Osocalis Alambic Brandy)
1 Egg. (1/2 large egg)
2 or 3 small Lumps of ice.
Shake well and remove the ice before serving. (Garnish with drops of Angostura Bitters.)

Right, I couldn’t even make a whole drink by combining 2 of the comically small, yet delicious, Brandy samples sent to me by Germain-Robin. I had to throw in a little Osocalis, sorry about that Germain-Robin. I understand smaller distilleries must struggle with sample requests, but how about enough to wet your tongue?

I couldn’t see the need for any extra sugar in a drink that is already half “Curacao” and only has “3 dashes Lemon Juice”. It certainly wouldn’t qualify as “Sour” if made to those specifications.

We only had “Extra Large” eggs at the moment, so using a whole egg seemed a little excessive.

On the whole, this is a tasty Egg Sour, I liked this drink quite a bit. I would definitely make it again for myself or even for a customer.

A lot of times, I find modern cocktail mixers will throw Lemon Juice into Flips, even though drinks in the “Flip” category traditionally contain no Citrus. I guess, thinking about it, what they’re making are Egg Sours for their customers. Tasty, but not a Flip.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Brandy Cocktail for Bottling

First, just a reminder that Sunday, March 27, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders (and me) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Another batched cocktail for bottling, this one with Brandy.

Brandy Cocktail for Bottling
5 Gallons Strong Brandy.
2 Gallons Water.
1 Quart Bitters.
1 Quart Gomme Syrup.
1 Bottle Curacao.
Mix thoroughly, and filter through Canton flannel.

Mmm, flannel filtered! Even plainer than the previous Bourbon Cocktail, get out your quart bottles of Angostura.

This recipe comes verbatim from the version of Jerry Thomas’ Bartender’s Guide that Darcy has up over on Art of Drink. This recipe was originally as follows:

Brandy Cocktail for Bottling.
Take 5 gallons of strong brandy.
2 gallons of water.
1 quart of Stoughton’s Bitters.
1 quart of gum syrup.
1 bottle of Curacoa.

Mix thoroughly, and filter through Canton flannel.

Young Man Cocktail

The countdown to the last “Cocktail” continues.

Say it with me, “FIVE!”

Young Man Cocktail
1 Dash Angostura Bitters. (1 dash Angostura Bitters)
2 Dashes Curacao. (1/2 teaspoon Clement Liqueur Creole Shrubb)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica Italian Vermouth)
3/4 Brandy. (2 1/4 oz Osocalis Brandy)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. Add olive or cherry (Olive!).

I have these great Agrinion Olives from Greece, so it wasn’t entirely perversity that led me to choose to garnish with an olive rather than a cherry. All the same, I suppose a cherry would be the more 20th-21st Century garnish.

Maybe I can start something new for the future? Random Cherries or Olives in cocktails.

Nah, probably not.

If I hadn’t been out of decent cherries, I would probably have preferred it.

Other than that, the Young Man is a perfectly enjoyable Brandy Manhattan, nothing wrong with that. I feel younger already.

…But maybe that’s just the burden of making more Savoy Cocktails being lifted from my back…

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Whip Cocktail

Whip Cocktail
1 Dash Absinthe.
3 Dashes Curacao.
1/4 French Vermouth.
1/4 Italian Vermouth.
1/4 Brandy.
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

When I was researching this cocktail, I discovered it in Robert Vermiere’s 1922 “Cocktails: How to Mix Them”.

In that he says, “This cocktail is well known amongst the naval officers of the Mediterranean Squadron. It is composed of: 1/8 gill Absinthe Pernod; 1/8 gill of French Vermouth; 1/8 gill of Brandy; 1/8 gill of Curacao; Shake until Frozen. In Egypt they call it “Kurbag,” which is the Arabic word for whip.”

So, in Vermeire’s world, the Whip is an equal parts cocktail.

Figured I’d give that a go.

Whip Cocktail

1/2 oz Jade PF 1901 Absinthe
1/2 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth
1/2 oz Clement Creole Shrubb Orange Liqueur
1/2 oz Osocalis Rare Alambic Brandy

Shake well and strain into a cocktail glass.

Just coming off of the nearly undrinkable Which Way Cocktail, it’s interesting to see how much difference the moderation of a bit of vermouth adds to the enjoyment of the drink.  Well, that and some variety of taste from Orange Liqueur instead of Anisette.

This isn’t bad, not bad at all, and it didn’t need the rejiggering given to it by the Savoy editors.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Vermouth and Curacao Cocktail

Vermouth and Curacao Cocktail
1 Glass French Vermouth. (2 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)
1/2 Liqueur Glass Curacao. (3/4 oz Clement Liqueur Creole Shrubb)
Use medium size glass and fill with soda water (Err, Cavas Hill Cava. What?).

Like this Vermouth and Cassis Cocktail, this is another from Harry McElhone’s 1928 “ABC of Cocktails”, and like the Vermouth and Cassis, there really isn’t too much to get excited about.

Using Champagne ups the ante slightly, but I dunno, there just isn’t that much to the combo of Vermouth and Curacao. Nothing wrong with it exactly, just not that exciting.

If you make it, I’d at least spice it up with some Orange Bitters.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Temptation Cocktail

Temptation Cocktail
1 Piece Orange Peel.
1 Piece Lemon Peel.
2 Dashes Dubonnet. (5ml/1tsp Dubonnet Rouge)
2 Dashes Absinthe. (5ml/1tsp Greenway Distiller’s Absinthe Superior)
2 Dashes Curacao. (5ml/1tsp Brizard Curacao)
1 Glass Canadian Club Whisky. (2 oz Forty Creek 3 Grains Canadian Whisky)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Very similar to the Dandy Cocktail, (and with a similar method to the Newbury,) I do wonder where these cocktails which use citrus peels as an ingredient come from, as we have not yet identified a cocktail book as a source.

Interestingly, there’s a quote from the Hon. Wm (Cocktail) Boothby, Premier Mixologist, that addresses  this very issue:

Some of my recipes for the manufacture of cocktails order the dispenser to twist a piece of lemon peel into the glass in which the drink is to be served; in some establishments this is forbidden, the bartenders being ordered to twist and drop the peel into the mixing glass and strain the peel with the ice when putting the ice when  putting the drink into the mixing glass.  This is merely a matter of form, however, as the flavor is the same in both cases.

So it appears that in the cases of some establishments, rather than serving the peels in the drinks, they would be stirred in.

I don’t exactly agree with Boothby that the end result is the same. Stirring with the peel in the drink primarily flavors the drink with citrus oils, while squeezing over the cocktail accents the smell. I suppose for the best of both world’s you would stir with the peel in the drink, then squeeze over the finished cocktail, and discard. Whew! A lot of work!

A very tasty cocktail, the Temptation is one, like the Dandy, I feel could use a bit of a revival, certainly among those customers who like their cocktails Brown, Bitter, and Stirred. Well, unless they hate Absinthe/Anise, in which case, it might be best to stick with the Dandy.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Tango Cocktail

Tango Cocktail
2 Dashes Curacao. (5ml/1tsp Brizard Orange Curacao)
The Juice of 1/4 Orange. (Juice and peel 1/4 Navel Orange)
1/4 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 oz Carpano Antica Vermouth)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Tanqueray Dry Gin)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Garnish with long ribbon Orange Peel.)

Harry McElhone, the likely source for the recipe, formats it slightly differently in his book, “Barflies and Cocktails” : 1/6 Curacao; 1/6 Orange Juice; 1/3 Italian Vermouth; 1/3 Plymouth Gin. He also notes this is a, “Recipe by Harry, Bartender Palermo, Rue Fontaine, Paris.”

Hm, I hate to mention this to the Harrys, but isn’t the Tango the same cocktail as the Satan’s Whiskers?

Anyway, when we served the Satan’s Whiskers at Heaven’s Dog for our special Halloween menu last year, Erik Adkins had the insight to note, “Don’t over shake this drink.  Most of the ingredients have a low abv plus there is oj.  The drink should have a strong middle.”

That piece of advice has significantly improved my opinion of the Satan’s Whiskers as a cocktail. Well, that along with including a piece of orange peel in the shaker for added citrus ooomph.

I still think Satan’s Whiskers is a better name than it is a cocktail, per se, but for those occasions when a stiff drink might be a little too stiff, it is a nice option to have.

At Heaven’s Dog, we also sometimes make another rather amusingly named variation on this theme, “Satan’s Soul Patch”, which substitutes Bourbon for Gin and has a flamed orange peel as a garnish.

Don’t tell the manly men who usually order this drink, Satan’s Whiskers, or Satan’s Soul Patch that they are mostly drinking Vermouth and Orange Juice!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Mr. Eric Sutton’s Gin Blind Cocktail

Mr. Eric Sutton’s Gin Blind Cocktail
6 Parts Gin. (1 1/2 oz Hayman’s Old Tom Gin)
3 Parts Curacao. (3/4 oz Clement Creole Shrubb)
2 Parts Brandy. (1/2 oz Germain-Robin Fine Alambic Brandy)
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (1 dash Regan’s Orange Bitters, 1 Dash Fee’s)

Invented by THE Mr. Sutton. Chelsea Papers please copy. This is a very troublesome form of refreshment.

I went with a quarter ounce per “part”.

Well, if there was ever a cocktail that needed a “hard shake”, it’s this one, simply based on the proof of the ingredients involved. Though, aside from the measurements and strength, I’m don’t know what is so very “troublesome” about this “refreshment”. A tad sweet, but nothing particularly evil or insidious…

Looking up Eric Sutton, I’m not sure who this might be named after. Google is not particularly helpful.

There was a gentleman of that name who worked translating many books, notably Sartre and de Maupassant, into English in the 1920s through the 1950s. Though now that I look closer, it seems he translated books for Constable & Co, the publishers of the original version of the Savoy Cocktail Book! Oh ho!

One friend suggested that Carl Sutton, of Sutton Cellars fame, and myself should get together, drink a bunch of these, and get into some trouble. Knowing Carl, I believe that would be the outcome, no matter what we might be drinking.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Spanish Town Cocktail

Spanish Town Cocktail
5 Glasses Rum. (2 oz Saint James Ambre)
1 Dessertspoonful Curacao. (1 barspoon Clement Creole Shrubb)

Pour into shaker, add a large quantity of ice, and shake thoroughly. Grate a little nutmeg over each glass as serve.

I always enjoy when the Savoy Cocktail Book is vague. Rum? Goodness, the length and breadth of types of Rum makes the variations on this cocktail nearly infinite. Of course it is just a slightly orangey and sweet glass of cold, diluted rum.

As with the Gin in the Southern Gin Cocktail, whether you will enjoy the Spanish Town is nearly entirely dependent on whether you enjoy the Rum you make it with.

Pick one you enjoy sipping, and you might discover interesting characteristics you hadn’t noticed before.

Personally, I really enjoy St. James’ Ambre, a Rhum Agricole from Martinique. It’s not quite a sipping rum, but has such interesting earthy, cane character it is one of my favorites. You can almost taste the cane fields burning. Unfortunately, the distributor has dropped the brand and is no longer importing it into the US. If you have some, or its older siblings, enjoy it while you have it.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.