Sunrise Cocktail

Sunrise Cocktail
1/4 Grenadine. (1/3 oz Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1/4 Crème de Violette. (1/3 oz Benoit-Serres Liqueur de Violette)
1/4 Yellow Chartreuse. (1/3 oz Yellow Chartreuse)
1/4 Cointreau. (1/3 oz Cointreau)
Use liqueur glass and pour ingredients in carefully so that they do not mix.

Odd to have two Pousse Cafe style cocktails so close together.

I tried to pour this in the order given, only to discover that the Yellow Chartreuse preferred to be under the Liqueur de Violette. Well, if you pour these things steadily and slowly enough, they usually self correct.

Can’t say that there is anything in particular to recommend this combination, other than maybe that the orange of the Cointreau and the Violette of the Benoit-Serres are a pretty interesting combo.

Other than that, it’s just a pretty drink, even if it is slightly out of order.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Snowball Cocktail

006

Snowball Cocktail
1/6 Crème de Violette. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Benoit Serres liqueur de violette)
1/6 White Crème de Menthe. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Brizard White Creme de Menthe)
1/6 Anisette. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Anis del Mono dulce)
1/6 Sweet Cream. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Cream)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Tanqueray Gin*)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

This is woman’s work.

I have, in the past, put myself on record as saying this is possibly one of the worst cocktails in the entire Savoy cocktail Book.

Oddly, I have made this monstrosity on more than one occasion during our Savoy Cocktail Book Nights at Alembic Bar. In fact, one time it was even an out of town bartender who asked for it. I was like, “Really?! You know what is in that, right?” Yet he persisted in his desire to experience the Snowball. Curious. Whenever we make it there, it just seems so much worse than anything else we make in the course of the evening.

Considered on its own, however, and in this rather diminutive size, I am not entirely sure it is without its own charms. Perhaps it was my choice of brands? Tanqueray having a bit more spine than the usual Beefeater, Benoit Serres being a fine Violette, Brizard being a tasty Menthe, and Anis del Mono, one of the finest spanish Anis.

In any case, this wasn’t quite the creamy mouthwash disaster I remember. Still, as the Savoy Cocktail Book sez, this really is “Women’s Work”.

*The jungle wrapped, half bottle of Tanqueray Gin used in this cocktail was sent to me by a firm promoting the brand, and, as you may have read on other blogs, the putative birthday of Charles Tanqueray, alleged inventor of the gin. I actually like to have Tanqueray in the house, as it is a fine example of Juniper heavy London Dry Gin. However, as it is rather more expensive than the always useful Beefeater, I often pass it up and save my “special gin” money for things like Junipero. Drinking it in this cocktail, I am reminded that it is really a very good gin.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Rainbow Cocktail

Rainbow Cocktail

Rainbow Cocktail.
1/7 Crème de Cacao. (1/4 oz Mozart Black Chocolate Liqueur)
1/7 Crème de Violette. (1/4 oz Rothman & Winter Violette)
1/7 Yellow Chartreuse. (1/4 oz Yellow Chartreuse)
1/7 Maraschino. (1/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
1/7 Benedictine. (1/4 oz Benedictine)
1/7 Green Chartreuse. (1/4 oz Green Chartreuse)
1/7 Brandy. (1/4 oz Chateau de Pellehaut Reserve Armagnac)
Use liqueur glass and pour ingredients carefully so that they do not mix.

For those of you keeping track, the ingredients arranged themselves in the following order, bottom to top: Mozart Black, Luxardo Maraschino, Benedictine/YellowChartreuse, R&W Violette, Green Chartreuse, Brandy.

Every once in a while someone orders this during Savoy Cocktail Nights at Alembic Bar and we all groan. Why, oh why?

It’s true these are all perfectly palatable liqueurs, but this is just such a pain in the ass to concoct.  And the whole thing together, while not entirely unpleasant, is a bit of a shock to the system, if you are sensitive to sugar.

I finished it, it is true, more out of curiosity than anything else.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.