Old Etonian Cocktail

Old Etonian Cocktail

Old Etonian Cocktail

2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (Angostura Bitters)
2 Dashes Crème de Noyau. (2/3 barspoon Rowley Noyau)
1/2 London Gin. (1 1/2 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 11)
1/2 Kina Lillet. (1 1/2 oz Homemade Lillet Clone)

Shake will and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze orange peel on top.

Lot of homemade shit in this one, eh?

Homemade Noyah

Now you know when you get liqueur in a bottle as confidence inspiring as the above, you are in for a treat.

Matt Rowley, being the fearless man that he is, made a batch of Noyau earlier this year: If I had a Hammer. The minute after I read his post, I had an email out to Rowley asking if he was interested in a trade of Noyau for Nocino. He was amenable and soon a bottle of Noyau appeared in the mail.

Zyklon B or no, it is tasty stuff. If you don’t have an enterprising friend like Rowley, the usual substitution of Amaretto will likely be fine.

The cocktail is one of the more pleasing in recent memory. The bitter almond and cherry-like flavor of the Noyau combines quite well with the slightly sweet oranginess of the Kina Lillet Clone. I can only imagine it would be tastier with Cocchi Americano.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Lily Cocktail

Lily Cocktail
Lily Cocktail

1 Dash Lemon Juice. (ok, a little much, at one teaspoon)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Beefeater’s Gin)
1/3 Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Cocchi Aperitivo Americano)
1/3 Crème de Noyau. (3/4 oz Luxardo Amaretto di Saschira)

Shake (stir?) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I still have a dream that I will one day run across Noyau de Poissy, but until then I’m using the Luxardo Amaretto where Crème de Noyau is called for.

I’ve heard some rumors on the Cocchi Americano front, but nothing concrete yet. I’ve got my fingers crossed!

The Lily is on the sweet side, but I’m surprised to admit I found it a fascinating beverage. The Americano and the Amaretto are a really interesting flavor combination.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Fairbanks Cocktail (No. 2)

Fairbanks Cocktail (No. 2)

2 Dashes Crème de Noyau. (1/2 tsp. Luxardo Amaretto)
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (Dash Fee’s, Dash Regan’s Orange)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Vermouth)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Beefeater’s Gin)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.  (Add a cherry, if desired.)

Note – We often wondered what Doug did it on now that we know we are going to try to do it ourselves.

In his 1922 book, “Cocktails: How to Mix Them,” Robert Vermeire calls this the “Fairbank Cocktail” and uses equal parts (“¼ Gill”) of French Vermouth and Gin. I’ll assume that the Savoy author is referring to Douglas Fairbanks. However, since evidence indicates Fairbanks was rather well known as a teetotaler*, I will note that Vermeire also gives the following information, “This drink is called after Senator Fairbank, a personal friend of the late President Roosevelt, of America.” That would be Teddy, not Franklin, as this was written in 1922.

I have still failed to come across a decent Noyau, and refuse to buy the Hiram Walker, so substitute Amaretto here. Unfortunately, the Luxardo Amaretto is a nominally worse than average substitution, as they use actual almonds to flavor it, instead of the usual Apricot pits. C’est la vie.

As made, it is a subtle and tasty update of the standard Martini formula. Quite nice, with the hint of almond and bare touch of sweetness.

*From an article at the Douglas Fairbanks Museum, “…all the more surprising since Fairbanks himself was a lifelong teetotaler who didn’t even drink alcohol.” From another article about Mary Pickford, “Douglas, an athletic, colossal star…A fanatical, snobbish teetotaler…disapproved of Mary’s drinking…”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Eye Opener Cocktail

Eye-Opener Cocktail

The Yolk of 1 Fresh Egg.
1 Teaspoonful Powdered Sugar. (scant teaspoon Caster Sugar)
2 Dashes Absinthe. (1/2 tsp Verte de Fougerolles)
2 Dashes Curacao. (1/2 tsp Brizard Orange Curacao)
2 Dashes Crème de Noyau. (1/2 tsp Amaretto di Saschira)
1 Liqueur Glass Rum. (1 1/2 oz Inner Circle Green Rum)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Sadly, my schemes to acquire Noyau de Poissy or Noyau de Vernon have so far come to naught, so I have substituted Luxardo’s Amaretto.

Unlikely though it seems, this is a very nice cocktail, and will certainly open your eyes, should they previously have been closed.

Both this and the preceding “Everything But” would make tremendous brunch cocktails. If we find enough of these, maybe we can finally put those old saws, the mimosa and screwdriver, back to bed where they belong.

By the way, If you’re like me, you’ll make this cocktail, taste it, and think of that open bottle of champagne in your fridge. Go for it. It’s even tastier that way.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.