Barbary Coast Cocktail

The Barbary Coast Cocktail

1/4 Gin. (1 oz Beefeater’s Gin)
1/4 Scotch Whisky. (1 oz Compass Box Asyla Scotch Whisky)
1/4 Crème de Cacao. (1 oz Bols White Creme de Cacao)
1/4 Cream. (1 oz Cream)
Cracked Ice.

Serve in a highball glass. (Fill highball glass with crushed ice, build ingredients in glass, stir until outside of glass frosts over.)

Most other cocktail books seem to either make the Barbary Coast as a shaken “up” cocktail (1/2 oz each ingredient) or as a highball (2oz whiskey, 1/2 oz rest, built over ice, topped with soda).

However, since this is one of the few Savoy cocktails that doesn’t include the instruction, “Shake well and strain into cocktail glass,” I’m pretty sure that wasn’t intended. There is also no mention of soda. I decided to treat it as a “swizzle”. Also, I didn’t have dark Creme de Cacao at the time, but it might be a better choice, just for coloration reasons, than the White. Or if you’ve got it, Mozart Black Chocolate Liqueur will bring both color and some nice dark chocolate flavor.

As an aside, with many of the cream cocktails I’m afraid I must admit the routine is, shake, strain, sip, dump. They’re usually too sweet and my doctor has told me to avoid dairy. For what it is worth, against my own best interests, I finished this one.

Also, based on the assumption that this cocktail is named after the San Francisco’s Gold Rush era Barbary Coast neighborhood, I will include the following quote, from Benjamin Estelle Lloyd, writing in 1876:

The Barbary Coast is the haunt of the low and the vile of every kind. The petty thief, the house burglar, the tramp, the whoremonger, lewd women, cutthroats, murderers, all are found here. Dance-halls and concert-saloons, where blear-eyed men and faded women drink vile liquor, smoke offensive tobacco, engage in vulgar conduct, sing obscene songs and say and do everything to heap upon themselves more degradation, are numerous. Low gambling houses, thronged with riot-loving rowdies, in all stages of intoxication, are there. Opium dens, where heathen Chinese and God-forsaken men and women are sprawled in miscellaneous confusion, disgustingly drowsy or completely overcome, are there. Licentiousness, debauchery, pollution, loathsome disease, insanity from dissipation, misery, poverty, wealth, profanity, blasphemy, and death, are there. And Hell, yawning to receive the putrid mass, is there also.

Nice to know things haven’t changed too much…

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Barbara Cocktail

Barbara Cocktail

1/4 Fresh Cream. (1/2 oz Cream)
1/4 Crème de Cacao. (1/2 oz Bols White Crème de Cacao)
1/2 Vodka. (1 oz Rain Vodka)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Shake on some Cocoa Powder to garnish.)

This Alexander variation is one of the only 4 uses of Vodka in the Savoy Cocktail book. I admit, I prefer my Alexanders made with Brandy. But, that’s not really saying much.

By the way, if anyone has advice on better brands of white Crème de Cacao, please let me know. The Bols (US) isn’t bad; but, not the greatest, either. Not a very intense chocolate flavor. I suspect these cocktails would be better with a more full flavored liqueur. Brizard, maybe?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Alexander’s Sister Cocktail

Alexander’s Sister Cocktail

1/3 Dry Gin (1 oz Beefeater’s Gin)
1/3 Creme de Menthe (1 oz Brizard Creme de Menthe)
1/3 Sweet Cream (1 oz Cream)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Ladies are advised to avoid this cocktail as often as possible.

Or anyone else for that matter. My aversion to dairy and overly sweet cocktails makes this slightly stiffer cousin of the Grasshopper one of my least favorite of cocktails from the “Savoy Cocktail Book.”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Alexander Cocktail (No. 2)

Alexander Cocktail (No. 2)

1/3 Crème de Cacao. (generous 3/4 oz Crème de Cacao)
1/3 Brandy. (generous 3/4 oz Korbel VSOP Brandy)
1/3 Fresh Cream. (generous 3/4 oz Sweet Cream)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Even though I neglected it, a sprinkle of freshly grated nutmeg or cocoa is a nice addition to this cocktail.)

I guess I don’t particularly think of this as a 1930s style cocktail, as by the time I grew up in the 1970s, it was a staple of bars all over the Midwest.

I do, however, have a vague memory of it being an ice cream blender drink when I was growing up, rather than a cocktail.

Like the Alexander (No. 1) it does need to be shaken well, and to me is rather more appealing.

Oddly, on Feist’s new record “The Reminder” there is a song about a boy she calls her “Brandy Alexander.” “Always gets me into trouble,” but, “It goes down easy.” A fine characterization of a Brandy Alexander, if there ever was one.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Alexander Cocktail (No. 1)

Alexander Cocktail

l/2 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Dry Gin)
1/4 Crème de Cacao. (3/4 oz)
1/4 Sweet Cream. (3/4 oz Cream)

Shake (very!) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Garnish with a sprinkle of cocoa.)

You probably won’t find this version of the Alexander made too often anymore, though at one time it was probably the most popular. The Brandy Alexander seems to be the default these days.

In any case, the gin version of the Alexander is alright, I suppose, if you like this sort of girly type drink. Like all cream based cocktails, you do need to really shake the Alexander Cocktail hard and long, to give it the lightness and air it needs.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.