Whizz-Doodle Cocktail

First, just a reminder that Sunday, Jan 30, 2010, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders (and me) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Whizz-Doodle Cocktail
1/4 Scotch Whisky.
1/4 Sweet Cream.
1/4 Crème de Cacao.
1/4 Dry Gin
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Uh, yeah, right. I’m not making that.

Especially since I’ve already made it once, under another name: Barbary Coast Cocktail

Casting about for a Re-make/Re-model for this cocktail, I recalled the strategy I used for the Parisian Blonde, using a sort of divide and conquer method I learned from Erik Adkins at Heaven’s Dog.

I was chatting the other day in the Mixo Bar, grousing about having to make this horror. Between the insults to my Mom’s honor and comments about my own extreme age, I managed to sneak in a question, asking my compatriots which Scotch would go best with chocolate. Paul Clarke suggested Speyside, with its flavors of honey and heather. Unfortunately, (or fortunately,) the only Speyside Single Malt in the house at the moment is The MacAllan Cask Strength.

Hm, honey and Scotch is always a winning combo. But, do I have to use Creme de Cacao at all to get the chocolate flavor in this cocktail? Maybe another strategy for the Chocolate. And speaking of other strategies, does the Dry Gin have any function at all here, beyond a lengthener? Why not just use Vodka, and a single grain vodka at that, for the other spirit in this drink?

Whizz-Doodle Re-Make/Re-Model

1 oz Macallan Cask Strength Scotch;
1 oz Vodka Which Shall Not Be Named;
1 Barspoon JC Snyder Wild Buckwheat Honey*;
dash Bittermens Mole Bitters;
1/2 oz Cream;
Bittersweet Chocolate.

Dissolve Honey in Scotch and Vodka, add a Dash (or two) Mole Bitters, and stir with ice to chill. Strain into a cocktail glass. Whip cream to soft foam and float on top. Garnish with grated bitter chocolate.

Holy Crap! That is pretty decent, a dessert cocktail for Scotch and chocolate loving friends. It is certainly an improvement over the Barbary Coast.

*As a certified honey enthusiast and student of Botany, I will note that this is NOT the type of honey most often sold in the rest of the US as “Buckwheat Honey”. Most Buckwheat Honey comes from the same Buckwheat used to make Buckwheat Flour (aka Fagopyrum esculentum). The honey which Bees make from this type of Buckwheat is extremely dark and pungent. Some say unpleasantly so. However, in California there are several native plants also called Buckwheats: California Buckwheat. The honey Bees make from these plants is fairly lightly flavored and quite pleasant. If you don’t have access to California Buckwhat honey, choose another light, not too fruity honey. Clover would probably be a good choice.

Re-Made/Re-Modeled.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Tropical Cocktail

Tropical Cocktail
1 Dash Angostura Bitters. (1 dash Angostura Bitters)
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (1 dash Angostura Orange)
1/3 Crème de Cacao. (1 barspoon Bols Creme de Cacao)
1/3 Maraschino. (1 barspoon Luxardo Maraschino)
1/3 French Vermouth. (2 oz Noilly Prat Vermouth)

Stir well, strain into a cocktail glass, with cherry.

Well, if there is anything that might put me off of drinking, it’s probably this concoction. Jeez, equal parts of French Vermouth, Maraschino, and Creme de Cacao? It doesn’t even have any booze!

I had some idle hope that this could be saved, a la Chrysanthemum, to make a pleasant light aperitif Coctkail. Nope, this just doesn’t appeal, at all, even slightly dried out. I can’t imagine what this would taste like as the dessert cocktail it sounds like in the recipe.

After a few months of over doing it, what with the trips to Spain, Chicago, and Wisconsin, it was about time to cut back significantly on the drinking. There was just a little too much grease in the wheels, things were getting a little blurry.

I have a couple friends who manage to balance abstention with bartending, so I thought I would give that a try for a while.

Got through a couple weeks of drying out, started feeling pretty good. Michele was proud of me. I was only straw tasting at the bar, and only tasting Savoy Cocktails. It was quite pleasant not to have quite the adjustment on Mondays that I had been having, from the drinking to the sober life.

Feeling good, it seemed like it was about time to get some things out of the way: Visit the Dentist, Get a check-up from my Doctor.

Dentist visit went well, they even praised me for the job I had been doing flossing. Gum health good. Woo!

Visited the Doctor. Blood pressure good, cholesterol not bad, Doctor said I was seeming pretty healthy.

Then later in the week, I got a call. My Doctor would like to schedule a visit to a specialist, to follow up on some of the numbers in one of the tests. They were a little high for someone my age.

Yeah, that’s just great. Just like life. Mostly give up drinking, feeling healthy, good attitude. Then the Doctor tells you, “Oh, by the way, you might have cancer.”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Savoy Hotel Cocktail

018

Savoy Hotel Cocktail
1/3 Crème de Cacao. (1/2 oz Mozart Black Chocolate Liqueur)
1/3 Benedictine. (1/2 oz Benedictine)
1/3 Brandy. (1/2 oz Chateau Pellehaut Reserve Armagnac)
Use liqueur glass and pour ingredients carefully so that they do not mix.

My goodness, it has been a while since I have had to make a layered cocktail!

This one was a symphony in brown and not all that unpleasant, as these sorts of things go.

In fact, I could see it complementing a cup of coffee quite nicely.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Russian Cocktail

010Cropped

Russian Cocktail.
1/3 Crème de Cacao. (3/4 oz Bols White Creme de Cacao, errr, no, 3/4 oz Yellow Chartreuse!)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Beefeater Gin)
1/3 Vodka. (3/4 oz Crystal Head Vodka)
Shake well, strain into cocktail glass, and tossitoff quickski.

To be honest, I don’t really get the combination of Gin and Creme de Cacao, Vodka or no. And to be perfectly honest, you could probably sub in any other relatively clear liqueur and be happier. I know I was, using Yellow Chartreuse instead of Creme de Cacao.

The goofy Crystal Head vodka came in the mail from some company promoting the brand. It is a perfectly fine, if somewhat bland vodka.  I think it retails for something like $45 US, more than I ever pay for vodka.  Nice skull, though.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Rainbow Cocktail

Rainbow Cocktail

Rainbow Cocktail.
1/7 Crème de Cacao. (1/4 oz Mozart Black Chocolate Liqueur)
1/7 Crème de Violette. (1/4 oz Rothman & Winter Violette)
1/7 Yellow Chartreuse. (1/4 oz Yellow Chartreuse)
1/7 Maraschino. (1/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
1/7 Benedictine. (1/4 oz Benedictine)
1/7 Green Chartreuse. (1/4 oz Green Chartreuse)
1/7 Brandy. (1/4 oz Chateau de Pellehaut Reserve Armagnac)
Use liqueur glass and pour ingredients carefully so that they do not mix.

For those of you keeping track, the ingredients arranged themselves in the following order, bottom to top: Mozart Black, Luxardo Maraschino, Benedictine/YellowChartreuse, R&W Violette, Green Chartreuse, Brandy.

Every once in a while someone orders this during Savoy Cocktail Nights at Alembic Bar and we all groan. Why, oh why?

It’s true these are all perfectly palatable liqueurs, but this is just such a pain in the ass to concoct.  And the whole thing together, while not entirely unpleasant, is a bit of a shock to the system, if you are sensitive to sugar.

I finished it, it is true, more out of curiosity than anything else.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Princess Mary Cocktail

Princess Mary Cocktail

Princess Mary Cocktail.

1/3 Crème de Cacao. (3/4 oz Mozart Black Chocolate Liqueur)
1/3 Sweet Cream. (3/4 oz Cream)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 6)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

In his book, “Barflies and Cocktails,” Harry McElhone tells us, “This cocktail was introduced by myself in honour of Princess Mary’s wedding to Lord Lascelles, February, 1922.”

Not quite sure how to break it to him that this is pretty much just an Alexander (No. 1).

The Mozart Black Chocolate is their only non-cream based chocolate liqueur.  However, it is made with dark chocolate and fairly flavorful.  At least compared to many Creme de Cacao.  I suppose it is cheating slightly to use the Mozart in this drink.

However, with the Mozart Black Chocolate, this is not all bad.  I mean, if a slightly ginny glass of chocolate milk doesn’t sound “all bad” to you, this will likely appeal.  Surely better than the preceding Poppy Cocktail!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Poppy Cocktail

Poppy Cocktail

Poppy Cocktail.
1/3 Crème de Cacao. (3/4 oz Mozart Black Chocolate Liqueur)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Death’s Door Gin)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

A cream-less Alexander Cocktail?

As much as I don’t really like the Alexander, the Poppy is even less appealing.

Not at all advised.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Panama Cocktail

Panama Cocktail

Panama Cocktail.

1/3 Crème de Cacao. (3/4 oz Mozart Black Chocolate Liqueur)
1/3 Sweet Cream. (3/4 oz Cream)
1/3 Brandy. (3/4 oz Osocalis Brandy)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.  (How about: Lightly whip cream with a dash of sugar syrup until slightly thickened.  Stir brandy and Creme de Cacao together to chill and strain into a cocktail glass.  Layer thickened cream carefully onto drink.  Garnish with freshly grated nutmeg.)

OK, I’m cheating.  I can’t take the credit for this great idea.

One of the drinks we are serving at Heaven’s Dog is from Charles H. Baker, Jr. and called the “Tiger’s Milk II”.  This drink follows the pattern for most cream and spirits drinks and is of typically Baker-esque proportions.

Old brandy 1 1/2 jiggers, Bacardi Gold Seal the same; 1/2 cup each of thick cream and milk, then sweeten to taste.  Shake vigorously for at least 1/2 minute with big lumps of ice and serve in a goblet.  Dust with nutmeg, or ground mace, or cinnamon.

Uh, yeah, since Baker preferred 2 oz jiggers, that’s, um, 6 ounces of spirits and a cup of half and half. Wheee! That’s a party in a glass, all right.

Erik Adkins shrunk the spirits by about a third, then separated the cream agitation from the chilling of the cocktail. When I asked he how he’d thought of separating the cream out of the drink into a separate element, he said he’d seen a similar drink at Clover Club in Brooklyn, NY. In any case, the Tiger’s Milk II has proven to be a brisk seller at the restaurant, even if it is a bit of a pain to make.

So I am stealing from him and the Clover Club here for my version of the Panama.

Give it a try some time, and you’ll see this Alexander-like drink in a new light.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Fox River Cocktail

Fox River Cocktail

4 Dashes Peach Bitters. (1 tsp Fee’s Peach Bitters)
1 Lump of ice.
1/4 Crème de Cacao. (1/2 oz Mozart Black Chocolate Liqueur)
3/4 Canadian Club Whisky. (1 1/2 oz 40 Creek Barrel Select)

Use wineglass and squeeze lemon peel on top.

Hmmm…

Looking at this now, it seems like it should be built, old fashioned style, rather than stirred with ice and strained into a glass as I did.

All the same, I was OK with everything here except the lemon twist. I just didn’t like how the lemon combined with the chocolate, peach, and whiskey.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Fifth Avenue Cocktail

Fifth Avenue Cocktail

1/3 Crème de Cacao. (Mozart Black Chocolate Liqueur)
1/3 Apricot Brandy. (Rothman & Winter Orchard Apricot)
1/3 Sweet Cream.

Use liqueur glass and pour carefully, so that ingredients do not mix.

This was actually pretty yummy, as these sorts of things go. But, then, I enjoy drinking the R&W Orchard Apricot straight. So, no problem there. Heck, I’d probably have it with my toast in the morning, or on my pancakes, if I didn’t have a pesky job to go to.

I got the Mozart Black Chocolate liqueur a while ago and have failed in my imagination to find uses for it. This was really pretty good. Certainly beats the heck out of Bols Creme de Cacao. I’m just glad that the specific gravities worked out between the two liqueurs.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.